web analytics
April 25, 2014 / 25 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Manischewitz Company’

Manischewitz Debuts Kosher Recipe App

Monday, August 19th, 2013

The Manischewitz Company, leader and innovator in Kosher foods, announces the beta version debut of their free Kosher Recipe App now available for download on all Apple and Android devices. The Manischewitz Recipe & Holiday Guide app makes its debut just in time for the fall Jewish holidays of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. Notable chefs, cookbook authors, and everyday home cooks submitted hundreds of recipes for the app which spans many occasions including Passover, Chanukah, Thanksgiving, Shabbat, Shavuot and more. Other categories of recipes include gluten-free, everyday meals, lunches, side dishes, and desserts.

The contributor’s shared many recipes, some of which have been in their family for generations. In addition to the recipes supplied by home cooks and well-known chefs, all recipes from finalists and winners from all past Man-O-Manischewitz Cook-Off Contests have been included as well. Jamie Geller, cookbook author and found of The Joy of Kosher magazine and website, contributed numerous recipes across all categories.

Key App Features Include:

All Kosher recipes that use Manischewitz ingredients Recipes for Holiday and everyday including Chanukah, Thanksgiving, Passover, Shabbat, Shavuot, 4th of July, Purim, and more Holiday fun facts Shabbat times for each week Recipe sharing on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest

Besides being kosher and easy to prepare, all the recipes feature some of the most popular Manischewitz products including all natural broths, noodles, matzo, matzo meal, honey, and many more. It is very easy to find recipes by typing in keywords or searching through the categories. The app will be an easy way for families to find new favorite recipes that can be shared and enjoyed at holiday and everyday meals.

The Manischewitz Recipe & Holiday Guide can now be downloaded for free to any Apple or Android device by searching for “Manischewitz” in the App Store for Apple devices, and the Google Play Store for Android devices, or by visiting the respective stores at the links below:

(Apple)

(Android)

Manischewitz Promises A Passover With Tam Tams

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

SAN FRANCISCO – They’re baaack. Duly chastened by the Great Tam Tam Crisis of spring ’08, the Manischewitz Company went into overdrive and will have plenty of the crunchy six-sided unleavened crackers available this Passover season.

    ”Absolutely,” declared the company’s former CEO Bruce Bossidy last November.

Bossidy joined the country’s first and still largest matzah-making concern in January 2008 and spent much of the year bringing in new management and getting the new matzah production line up and running at the company’s year-old, $15 million facility in Newark, N.J.

But the clock ran down and early last year, Bossidy was forced to cancel Tam Tams for the first time in 68 years.

The outcry was immediate; Jewish consumers coast to coast mourned the absence of the beloved cracker. Stories ran not only in the Jewish media but The New York Times and New York Daily News, and on NPR. The blogosphere exploded with anger. A black market sprang up, with one Michigan rabbi offering three boxes of the previous year’s crackers on eBay; bidding started at $10.

This April, however, there will be more than enough to go around. All flavors of Passover Tam Tam crackers will be available except for Tiny Tams, which were not made because of complications with the die cut used to create them. Bossidy also promised a sufficient amount of Passover matzah; last year saw shortages of the unleavened holiday bread in the Northeast and along the West Coast during the eight-day holiday.

While Manischewitz makes an array of kosher products, it was founded in 1888 as the country’s first commercial matzah bakery and matzah remains central to its mission.

Like most kosher food manufacturers, Manischewitz’s busiest season is Passover. Fifty percent of its business involves kosher-for-Passover food, particularly matzah, which is an extremely labor-intensive product.

As one of two sacramental foods required at the seder table, along with wine, production is carefully controlled to ensure that water only comes into contact with the flour for less than 18 minutes. Longer than that and, according to rabbinic authorities, leavening begins.

In industrial production, a mashgiach, or kosher supervisor, must watch the flour from the time the wheat is milled until water is introduced to the flour during the mixing process. At that point the dough is given even closer supervision to make sure it is completely baked in less than 18 minutes.

Manischewitz begins making Passover matzah immediately after Labor Day and its manufacture continued until late February. During the five-month season, up to 20 mashgichim work on the product. This year for the first time the factory is using only kosher-for-Passover flour year-round, even for its daily matzah. Although the flour is more expensive to produce, it costs the company much less than shutting down the entire plant for four or five weeks every summer for re-kashering. Now the annual kashering takes about a week.

During the height of the Passover production season, one or two truckloads of flour arrive at the Manischewitz plant every day, about 500,000 pounds a week.

Nearly 76 million sheets of matzah are produced each year, enough to circle the globe if one wanted to waste perfectly good matzah in such a foolhardy way.  (JTA)

Manischewitz Promises A Passover With Tam Tams

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

SAN FRANCISCO – They’re baaack. Duly chastened by the Great Tam Tam Crisis of spring ’08, the Manischewitz Company went into overdrive and will have plenty of the crunchy six-sided unleavened crackers available this Passover season.

    
“Absolutely,” declared the company’s former CEO Bruce Bossidy last November.

Bossidy joined the country’s first and still largest matzah-making concern in January 2008 and spent much of the year bringing in new management and getting the new matzah production line up and running at the company’s year-old, $15 million facility in Newark, N.J.


But the clock ran down and early last year, Bossidy was forced to cancel Tam Tams for the first time in 68 years.


The outcry was immediate; Jewish consumers coast to coast mourned the absence of the beloved cracker. Stories ran not only in the Jewish media but The New York Times and New York Daily News, and on NPR. The blogosphere exploded with anger. A black market sprang up, with one Michigan rabbi offering three boxes of the previous year’s crackers on eBay; bidding started at $10.


This April, however, there will be more than enough to go around. All flavors of Passover Tam Tam crackers will be available except for Tiny Tams, which were not made because of complications with the die cut used to create them. Bossidy also promised a sufficient amount of Passover matzah; last year saw shortages of the unleavened holiday bread in the Northeast and along the West Coast during the eight-day holiday.


While Manischewitz makes an array of kosher products, it was founded in 1888 as the country’s first commercial matzah bakery and matzah remains central to its mission.


Like most kosher food manufacturers, Manischewitz’s busiest season is Passover. Fifty percent of its business involves kosher-for-Passover food, particularly matzah, which is an extremely labor-intensive product.


As one of two sacramental foods required at the seder table, along with wine, production is carefully controlled to ensure that water only comes into contact with the flour for less than 18 minutes. Longer than that and, according to rabbinic authorities, leavening begins.


In industrial production, a mashgiach, or kosher supervisor, must watch the flour from the time the wheat is milled until water is introduced to the flour during the mixing process. At that point the dough is given even closer supervision to make sure it is completely baked in less than 18 minutes.


Manischewitz begins making Passover matzah immediately after Labor Day and its manufacture continued until late February. During the five-month season, up to 20 mashgichim work on the product. This year for the first time the factory is using only kosher-for-Passover flour year-round, even for its daily matzah. Although the flour is more expensive to produce, it costs the company much less than shutting down the entire plant for four or five weeks every summer for re-kashering. Now the annual kashering takes about a week.


During the height of the Passover production season, one or two truckloads of flour arrive at the Manischewitz plant every day, about 500,000 pounds a week.


Nearly 76 million sheets of matzah are produced each year, enough to circle the globe if one wanted to waste perfectly good matzah in such a foolhardy way.  (JTA)

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/food/manischewitz-promises-a-passover-with-tam-tams/2009/03/04/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: