web analytics
October 2, 2014 / 8 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘marco rubio’

Rubio Tells Peres, ‘Of Course’ Jerusalem is Israel’s Capital

Wednesday, February 20th, 2013

Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio boldly stated to President Shimon Peres in Jerusalem Wednesday that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel, but the office of the president omitted the remark in its Hebrew language press release of the meeting.

Already touted as presidential timber for the 2016 election campaign, Sen. Rubio told President Peres that Jerusalem is “of course the capital of your country,” a statement that no president or vice president would dare make given Palestinian Authority demands on the city.

U.S. State Department spokesmen on several occasions have refused to give a straight answer to reporters’ questions concerning the location of Israel’s capital.

The omission of Rubio’s statement in the official press release reflects Peres’ adulation of President Barack Obama and his concern not to rock the boat with Washington.

The Florida senator is on his first official visit to Israel, and his vocal recognition of Jerusalem sets the stage for a sharp contrast with Obama, who is to arrive next month for a visit that has been promoted in Israel as “Operation Unbreakable Alliance.” Obama, unlike previous presidents, has constantly terms Jerusalem neighborhoods of tens of thousands of residents “settlements” because they are in areas claimed by the Palestinian Authority.

Sen. Rubio also told the president that the relationship between the United States and Israel is Washington’s most important in the region, if not in the world. He added, “Israel represents all of the values of the United States.” He also said the American government cannot accept a nuclear Iran.

President Peres spoke about the “peace process,” his favorite topic, and also spoke with the senator n poetic language on the Middle East.

“We are an island of democracy in an uncertain and uneasy ocean, which is raging,” he said. “We must defend our island and do whatever is possible to calm the storm.”

On relations with the United States, Peres stated, “There are varied opinions in Israel, but one subject on which we all agree is the love of the United States” towards Israel.

Sen. Rubio Tells Netanyahu US-Israel Partnership is Bipartisan

Wednesday, February 20th, 2013

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu welcomes on Wednesday Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio, touted as one of the top possibilities to be GOP’s presidential candidate in 2016.

They traded the usual pleasantries, the Prime Minister stating his gratitude for American support and Rubio pledging to back security in Israel.

“You live in a challenging neighborhood but the Israeli-American relationship is one of the most important ones we have,” said the senator. “Certainly our commitment to that partnership is bipartisan and it should remain that way. And that’s why I’m pleased the President is coming here in March.”

Prime Minister Netanyahu stated, “I appreciate your support. I appreciate the tremendous support of the American people, bipartisan support for our security and our quest for peace. It’s a daunting task, both security and the quest for peace, but we know we have your support and we appreciate it. I look forward to talking with you about our challenges.”

Winning the Minority Vote

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013

After the 2012 Waterloo, Republican consultants retreated to some party boats and hotels, and began planning their comeback. Bereft of ideas, they took the media’s explanations for why they lost at face values. What they have delivered is a liberal’s eye diagnosis of why they lost and so they debuted a plan to win over Latinos with amnesty and to end their negative image with a new gentler look.

Mostly what they have proven is that they are even more clueless than they were a year ago.

Senator Marco Rubio seems like a nice guy, but if the Republicans are counting on him to deliver the Latino vote, they might want to take a closer look at his Senate win. While Rubio did indeed win the Cuban Latino vote, he only won 39 percent of the non-Cuban Latino vote. That’s the same Latino margin of victory as Rick Perry got. It’s the usual best score that Republicans get among Latinos.

Marco Rubio could be a guy named Mark Richardson for all the impact that he made among Latino voters. But that’s because the “Latino” vote is a ridiculous oversimplification. Latinos consist of Cubans, Puerto Ricans and Mexicans, to name just a few. And they don’t necessarily align.

Mayor Bloomberg ran against a Puerto Rican candidate and won the Mexican vote. Bloomberg may speak Spanish about as well as your Aunt Sally, but that didn’t really matter because he didn’t waste a lot of time telling stories about growing up poor in the slums of San Juan. Instead he worked with Mexican community leaders who were tired of being sidelined by Puerto Ricans, and advertised heavily on their radio stations and in their papers.

Race is certainly a factor, but it’s not the only factor. Most Black voters initially supported Hillary Clinton. If Herman Cain ran against Hillary Clinton in 2016, Clinton would beat him by a high margin. A Zogby poll shows Rubio beating Clinton among Latino voters, but how well that poll would hold up after Latino leaders have spent enough time getting the word out is another matter. Clinton beat Obama among Latino voters on Super Tuesday. Assuming that she won’t do the same to Rubio only because of his race is a risky bet.

There are two types of minority groups in the United States. Segregated and integrated. The more integrated a group becomes, the less of a bloc vote it is. A bloc vote is not simply a consistent pattern, it is the result of a segregated community that interfaces with the rest of the country through its leaders and local media. And those two interfaces are key.

It doesn’t really matter how many Latinos speak at the Republican National Convention or how many Republican senators sign on to Amnesty. These events will, for the most part, be processed through the filter of those community leaders and their associated newspapers and radio stations. Republicans imagine that they’re addressing Latinos, but aside from Univision appearances they mostly don’t even have access to them.

The percentage of the Latino vote that is accessible to Republicans largely comes from those Latinos who have integrated and are in the Middle Class. That is why the Republicans did so much better with the Latino vote in Ohio than Virginia. Median income and English language skills remain a fairly reliable predictor of the Republican vote.

Winning the minority vote is not simply about policy or diversity. That is an elementary lesson of the urban political machine that the Republican Party has bizarrely forgotten, even though it’s a lesson that goes back a century and a half in American politics. Diversity is not about finding binders of qualified candidates, but about elevating community leaders from minority groups who can deliver a share of the vote from their community.

It’s not pretty, but it is practical politics. Lincoln understood it and applied that methodology right down to the appointment of generals. The Democrats built an entire network of votes in every state by taking their urban political machine national. But the Republicans seem to think that it’s enough to have someone out there speaking Spanish. It’s a nice touch and the urban political machines used it. Mayor George B. McClellan, Jr., the son of General MacClellan, spoke a bewildering number of the languages that his constituents did. Mayor LaGuardia also juggled languages. But those are campaign tricks. They are not how the vote is delivered.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/columns/daniel-greenfield/winning-the-minority-vote/2013/02/12/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: