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September 27, 2016 / 24 Elul, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘medical’

Netanyahu’s 2016 Medical Report: Polyp in Large Intestine

Monday, August 15th, 2016

As per medical treatment protocol, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday underwent an annual series of comprehensive lab and medical tests by his personal physician, Dr. Tzvi Herman Berkovich. His gastroenterology test revealed a polyp in the large intestine that was removed during the test.

According to an official statement from his office, the Prime Minister maintains a healthy lifestyle, including a healthy diet.

Besides the gastro test, the Prime Minister underwent heart and lungs, urological, and ear, nose and throat tests.

Following last year’s statement, the Prime Minister has been under urological monitoring. But all his test results were completely normal.

Dr. Berkovich stated that the overall state of Prime Minister Netanyahu’s health is excellent.

David Israel

Online Fundraiser for Medical Treatment of Abayudaya Jewish Infant

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

Mugaga Treva, 4, is the son of Nantabo Esther, a member of Namanyonyi Synagogue, one of the Abayudaya Synagogues in Uganda. The boy has a chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, for which he was referred to Mulago National Hospital in Uganda. The treatment costs $750, but Esther Nantabo, a single parent, cannot afford it. A fundraising effort was launched Tuesday night which has begun to attract some donations.

The Abayudaya (“People of Judah”) are a Baganda community in eastern Uganda near the town of Mbale who practice Judaism. They are devout in their practice, keeping Kashrut, and observing Shabbat. The Abayudaya numbers are estimated at 2,000. They live in several villages and are recognized by the Reform and Conservative movements as Jews. Some of them practice strict Orthodox Rabbinical Judaism.

The group was founded by a Muganda military leader named Semei Kakungulu, who was converted to Christianity by British missionaries around 1880. When the British significantly limited his territory, and refused to recognize him as king—as they had promised, Kakungulu began seeking alternative religious affiliations, and came to believe that the customs and laws described in the Torah were true. In 1919, Kakungulu faced great resistance and was eventually ostracized when he insisted on circumcising his flock. He circumcised his sons and himself and declared that his community was Jewish. He then fled to the foot of Mt. Elgon and settled in a place called Gangama where he started a separatist sect known as Kibina Kya Bayudaya Absesiga Katonda (the Community of Jews who trust in the Lord). The British, infuriated by his move, severed all ties with him and his followers.

In 1920 a European Jew named Yosef arrived and taught the isolated community about the Jewish calendar and the Jewish holidays: Passover, Shavuot, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, and Succot. Yosef stayed for about six months, and educated the Abayudaya on Kashrut and Shabbat. Yosef convinced Semei Kakungulu to establish a kind of yeshiva, to pass on his teachings.

Kakungulu died in 1928, and was succeeded by Samson Mugombe, one of his disciples. The Abayudaya remained isolated for protection and survived persecution, including by Idi Amin, who outlawed Jewish rituals and destroyed synagogues. During the Amin persecutions, some of the Abayudaya converted to either Christianity or Islam. But a core group of some 300 members remained committed to Judaism, worshipping secretly, fearful that they would be discovered by their neighbors and reported to the authorities. This group later named itself She’erit Yisrael — the Remnant of Israel.

In 1962, Israeli Ambassador to Kenya Arye Oded, who at the time was studying at Makerere University, visited the Abayudaya and met Samson Mugombe. This was the first time the Abayudaya had ever met an Israeli and the first Jew they had met since Yosef. Oded conducted many long interviews with Mugombe and other leaders, and later reported on the group in his book “Religion and Politics in Uganda,” as well as in numerous articles.

In his article Shabbes Cholent in Uganda? Rabbi J. Hershy Worch wrote whimsically:

“You should have seen the grin on the faces of the young leaders of the community as they showed their elders the Shabbes-oven I had built into the packed earth floor of my bedroom, a shining smile that went from ear to ear. Eighty years they have waited for my cholent, can you imagine, the first hot food on a Shabbes morning for 80 years! Prometheus had no such thrill. Perhaps Moses, watching the Israelites licking their fingers over Manna in the wilderness may have had such naches, maybe.

“Most people know nothing about cholent, and those who do probably consider it no more than an odd quirk in the Jewish diet, something akin to gefilte-fish or latkes.

“To a hushed audience I explained the significance of the food they were eating. How Rabbinical Judaism, the Halacha, the Talmud well nigh demands hot food on Shabbes morning. This is how we Orthodox Jews may be distinguished from Karaites, Samaritans and other fundamentalists who rejected the Oral Torah. The hushed silence broke into a thunderous applause.”

JNi.Media

Hebrew U’s Dr. Yosef Buganim Honored for Stem Cell Research Breakthroughs

Tuesday, July 19th, 2016

Dr. Yosef Buganim, a research scientist at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, has been honored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the prestigious journals Science and Science Translational Medicine, and the Boyalife industrial research consortium, for his work in stem cells and regenerative medicine (see Dr. Buganim’s essay Back to basics).

Dr. Buganim is a young researcher who recently joined the Department of Molecular Biology and Cancer Research at the Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada (IMRIC). Part of the Hebrew University’s Faculty of Medicine, IMRIC is one of the most innovative and multidisciplinary biomedical research organizations in the world.

Awarded for the first time this year, the Boyalife Science & Science Translational Medicine Award in Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine honors researchers for outstanding contributions in stem cell research and regenerative medicine around the globe.

AAAS, Science, and Science Translational Medicine joined efforts with Boyalife, an industrial-research consortium formed in Wuxi, China, in 2009, to sponsor the award. Composed of prominent researchers, the judging panel was co-chaired by a Science and a Science Translational Medicine editor.

At his Hebrew University laboratory, Buganim uses somatic cell conversion models to identify and investigate the elements that facilitate safe and complete nuclear reprogramming.

As a postdoctoral fellow at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research at MIT, he used single-cell technologies and bioinformatic approaches to shed light on the molecular mechanisms that underlie the reprogramming of somatic cells to iPSCs.

Regenerative medicine is a developing field aimed at regenerating, replacing or engineering human cells, tissues or organs, to establish or restore normal function.

Embryonic stem cells have enormous potential in this area because they can differentiate into all cell types in the human body. However, two significant obstacles prevent their immediate use in medicine: ethical issues related to terminating human embryos, and rejection of foreign cells by a patient’s immune system.

In 2006, Japanese researchers discovered that it is possible to reprogram adult cells and return them to their embryonic stage, creating functional embryonic stem-like cells. These cells are known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and constitute a solution to these two obstacles.

In addition, these cells provide a good basis for modeling diseases and finding medical solutions, because they can be reproduced from different patients and different diseases.

Despite these cells’ enormous potential, their quality is still not sufficient to be used in clinical practice, and there is a need to find the best protocol that will enable production of high-quality iPSCs that will not endanger patients.

Dr. Buganim’s laboratory has made two major breakthroughs in this area, representing a major step forward in the field of regenerative medicine and transplantation.

Project A: To improve the quality of embryonic stem cells, Dr. Buganim and colleagues conducted bioinformatics analyses which pointed to four new key genes capable of creating iPSCs from skin cells, of superior quality to stem cells in current use. These cells produced in his laboratory (in this case mouse cells) are able to clone a whole mouse at a much higher percentage (80%) than other iPSCs (30%). This test is the most important one determine the quality of the cells.

Project B: Many women suffer recurrent miscarriages and abnormal development of the placenta, which causes fetal growth restriction and in some cases produces children with mental retardation. Dr. Buganim’s lab found the key genes of the placenta stem cells and by expressing them in surplus in skin cells, created placental iPSCs. These cells looked and behaved like natural placental stem cells.

Various tests showed that these cells have cell-generating capability in a Petri dish and inside a placenta that develops following a transplant. These cells have potential for use in regenerative medicine in cases of problematic placental functioning.

JNi.Media

Tiberias Medical First Response Team Now Trained in Firefighting Too

Sunday, July 3rd, 2016

17 employees of the The Baruch Padeh Medical Center, Poriya, near Tiberias in northern Israel have graduated a firefighting course which has now turned them into a well rounded first response team serving the Lake Kinneret area.

The first respondents were picked from a variety of hospital sectors to undergo special training at the Tiberias fire station. They received training in putting out fires, recognizing and handling dangerous materials, and scanning for and evacuating victims. The group passed a test at the end of the training.

According to Alex Shalmanzon, the Safety Officer at the Medical Center, the special crew will enhance the hospital’s ability to offer first response at a fire event and be able to effect an organized handing over control of the scene once the firefighters arrive on the scene.

Administrative Director Shimon Sabah praised the hospital employees who volunt

eered to undergo the special training, to boost the area’s readiness in times of an emergency.

JNi.Media

Weizmann Institute Teams with Pfizer

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

The Weizmann Institute in Rehovot and its commercial arm, the Yeda Research and Development company has announced a multi-year deal with Pfizer Pharmaceuticals’ Global  Research division, to explore areas of research that may not be as often addressed in the United States.

The agreement, made public on Monday (June 6), involves collaboration at the newly-established National Drug Discovery Institute (DDI) – located at the Weizmann Institute – in the Nancy and Steven Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine (G-INCPM).

The center will work on projects of mutual interest, in particular those that might address unmet medical needs.

“This is an exciting partnership for Pfizer,” said Mikael Dolsten, President of Pfizer Global Research.

“We have interacted with the Weizmann Institute for many years and have confidence in their scientific vision and expertise. We anticipate that this arrangement could potentially result in meaningful discoveries in the coming years,” he added.

For projects that appear to have further potential, Pfizer and Yeda said they would discuss research and development agreements.

Hana Levi Julian

Anxious Callers Can Now Track Israeli MDA Ambulances Via GPS

Monday, June 6th, 2016

Ever wonder how long it will take till the ambulance arrives?

Magen David Adom Israel has entered the 21st century (CE) with a new GPS service that allows anxiously waiting families and others to track the route of their ambulances up to arrival.

The new service began June 1, allowing a caller to see where the ambulance is via a link that is sent to the caller’s mobile phone from the dispatch center.

A text message containing the hyperlink is sent by the dispatch computer system to the caller’s phone, connecting the caller with a map that helps track the location of the assigned vehicle.

Hana Levi Julian

Medical Update on Soldier Wounded in Ramming Attack

Friday, May 6th, 2016

The soldier who was wounded in Tuesday’s ramming/terror attack near Dolev continues to be in serious condition.

He is being treated at Sheba hospital in Tel Hashomer. He is still unconscious and on a respirator. His life is still in danger.

Prayers can be said for Matan ben Sara.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/medical-update-on-soldier-wounded-in-ramming-attack/2016/05/06/

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