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November 29, 2014 / 7 Kislev, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘Mein Kampf’

Internet Tycoon under Fire for Rare Hitler-Signed Mein Kampf

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

A German-born Internet tycoon who is fighting extradition from New Zealand to the United States for racketeering is under fire for admitting he owns a rare signed copy of Hitler’s Mein Kampf.

Kim Dotcom, whose actual name is Kim Schmitz, is the founder of MegaUpload, a file-transfer website that U.S. authorities shut down in 2012.

He has just launched the Internet Party to contest New Zealand’s election in September, but denies being a Nazi sympathizer, saying the book was an investment because it will increase in value.

“I’m being told by some people in a disgusting smear campaign that I am somehow embracing a Nazi ideology,” he told local media earlier this week. “That is completely false; it’s a smear campaign to try and derail what we are trying to achieve today with the launch of the Internet Party.”

But Stephen Goodman, president of the New Zealand Jewish Council, told JTA, “People will be offended by this action and stating it with such pride from such a high-profile position shows great disrespect to those who suffered under the Nazi regime as well as the New Zealand soldiers who fought and died to rid the world of this tyranny. While this ownership is legal in New Zealand, it is morally unacceptable.”

Dotcom is fighting extradition to the United States, where he faces several racketeering charges for facilitating illegal downloading of songs and movies via his MegaUpload website.

Conservative leader John Key, the son of a Jewish refugee from Europe, is seeking his third term in office in September’s election.

‘Mein Kampf’ Signed by Adolf Hitler in LA Auction

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

Two rare early editions of “Mein Kampf” signed by Adolf Hitler may for more than $20,000 at an online auction on Thursday, AP reports.

Nate Sanders, owner of Nate D. Sanders Auctions in Los Angeles, expects criticism for auctioning the 1925 and 1926 books up for bid. But he says that it’s a piece of history, so it’s cool.

Hitler dictated “Mein Kampf,” two volumes of autobiography and anti-Semitic manifesto, to Rudolf Hess while he was in jail for an attempted coup d’état, to raise money for his criminal defense.

Both volumes’ fly-leaves feature Hitler’s signature with best wishes to his friend for the Christmas season.

Ideal for weddings and bar mitzvahs.

Bavaria Will not Reprint Hitler’s’ Mein Kampf’ In 2014

Thursday, December 12th, 2013

Bavaria has decided to scrap its plans to reprint Adolf Hitler’s “Mein Kampf” with critical commentary when a legal ban by Germany on republishing it expires at the end of 2015. Germany owns the book’s copyright because Hitler, born in Austria, was registered as a resident of Munich.

He wrote the autobiographical “Mein Kampf” (My Struggle) while he was in prison after his failed Munich coup. Responsible for the Holocaust, the extermination of six million European Jews by the Nazis, Hitler was chancellor from 1933 until he committed suicide in 1945 at the end of WWII.

Bavaria had planned publish a new edition with critical commentary from the Munich-based Institute for Contemporary History but has changed its mind, according to the European Jewish Press.

“Many conversations with Holocaust victims and their families have shown us that any sort of reprint of the disgraceful writings would cause enormous pain,” said Bavaria’s Science Minister Ludwig Spaenle. He also warned that any publisher who tried to reprint the seditious” book will face criminal charges.

Eight Things Holocaust Survivors Need You to Know

Friday, December 6th, 2013

Dying at an alarmingly fast rate (nearly one per hour in Israel), Holocaust survivors, some of the last first-hand witnesses to the atrocities committed during World War II, will soon become just another memory, and their words left to just mere paragraphs in text books. So many have been unable to share their traumatic stories, but for those who have, their reason for doing so is clear. They speak for those who died and can no longer speak for themselves, and they share some powerful messages. Among them are the following:

1. The Holocaust really did happen.

With the passage of time, fewer and fewer people are left to testify about life and death in the camps at the hands of the Nazis. Therefore, the more removed people become from this time in our history, the more unbelievable the event of the Holocaust becomes. Who in this generation could imagine such events ever being allowed to transpire? Surely, according to our younger population, someone could have and would have stopped such madness. To make matters worse, Holocaust deniers insist and work to prove that these crimes were never committed. Even American chief prosecutor Robert Jackson, during the Nuremburg Trials, worried that “unless record was made … future generations would not believe how horrible the truth was.” Little distresses Holocaust survivors more than hearing these people negate every atrocity that they lived through, while watching their loves ones and friends die at the hands of the Nazis. Although those involved tried to hide their crimes, Germans kept meticulous records. Some survivors have even received copies of their records from Germany in recent years. For example, there are records of Dachau inmates available online. Stripped of family, friends, education, and freedom, Holocaust survivors need you to know that this did, in fact, happen, and never forget that it did.

2. The number of victims is not exaggerated, and if anything is understated.

Another theory out there is that Holocaust survivors exaggerate the events of the Holocaust to play the role of martyr and use it to advance the interest of the Jewish people and the state of Israel. This trend, somewhat newer than denial, is known as distortion. Believers of this distortion theory insist any of the deaths were as a result of Nazi policy, but of only starvation and disease. They do not believe that gas chambers existed anywhere. Those who do admit to chambers of any sort, state that they were only used for disinfecting purposes to fight off the disease carrying lice. Yet, testimony of Rudolf Hoess, once commandant of Auschwitz Concentration Camp 2, claims otherwise. He clearly admits that gas chambers were indeed used for killing there. Holocaust survivors need you to look at and listen to the evidence for yourself. Research the Nuremburg Trials and go to the website for The United States Memorial Holocaust Museum, among other places, where access to such records is readily available. They want to make sure that you are not easily swayed by Deniers, Distortion theorists, or “Holocaust Revisionists.” Just look at and listen to the facts.

3. One of the greatest crimes of the Holocaust was that of indifference

To witness any injustice and do nothing about it is tragic. Unfortunately, this happened far too often during the time of the Holocaust. From individuals to the leadership of many countries, inaction aided Hitler in his quest for domination. This is a lesson that needs to be heeded today. When people stand by and accept the injustices that they see, it is as if they are saying that they accept what the perpetrator is doing, as if they accept it. It was true in Hitler’s time and true today. For example, in the case of school bullies, if students watch bullying in action and say nothing, it continues, and the bully has what seems like an accepting audience. If those witnesses just said something like, “That’s not cool,” and walked away, even if it is a friend, the audience is removed, and things could change. Granted, Hitler was not an easy man to stop, but certainly more lives could have been protected and saved had differences been tolerated, anti-Semitic attitudes changed, and immigration quotas been lifted to show that his methods were not approved of nor accepted.

4. No one should be judged for being different (whether it is race, religion, color, or anything else.)

Most survivors who share their stories intertwine a common theme within their personal testimonies. They tell their audiences about the dangers of judging others, and plead for an end to discrimination, prejudice, or hatred based on race, religion, color, or any other difference. They understand better than almost any other group of people alive today where these attitudes can lead when left unchecked. Unfortunately, the Holocaust did not put an end to these behaviors, and the battles against them must still be fought today to prevent further atrocities. Survivors need people to understand that if they can change these attitudes, lives will be saved.

5. Anti-Semitism still exists.

For every Holocaust survivor who tirelessly travels to speak to audiences of tens-to hundreds, there are people who show up and protest what they do. Harassing these often eighty to ninety year-old elderly educators, they criticize and demean the survivors, downplaying their experiences and tragic losses. They are frightened to go to speaking engagements at times, because of some of the hatred that they must confront. They must endure pain all over again as insults are hurled at them and they are accused of making up the very tragedies that they must live with every day. Imagine knowing your parents, seven year-old brother, and nine year-old sister were taken away and gassed in Treblinka, only to have people accuse you of making that up and criticizing you simply because of your religion or other differences. Witnesses need you to know that they still have to fight these battles, and they want you to help educate others of the dangers of these attitudes.

6. Never take your education for granted.

Those young Holocaust victims who were fortunate enough to survive often lost their chance of getting an education. Long before many of them were taken or forced into hiding, they were stripped of the privilege of attending school. As just one example, one survivor was no longer allowed to go to school shortly after the German occupation of her village. At that time she was twelve years old. When she was fifteen, she was taken to a labor camp. Following three and a half years in labor and concentration camps and a death march, she was liberated in 1945. From there, since she had no home to return to and her parents had been killed by the Nazis, she had to spend another four years in a displaced persons’ (DP) camp in Germany. She feels that with so many years of her life taken, she lost her chance at an education, and there is a tone of bitterness in her voice when she discusses it. She gets quite frustrated at those who throw away their chance at an education or those who do not take it seriously and waste time in school instead of learning. The message of many in her situation is, please don’t take your educational opportunities for granted.

7. Not all Germans were bad

Regardless of the horrific stories told by survivors, most will tell you that not all Germans were bad, not even all Nazis. Some survivors attribute their existence today to one or more of them who helped them by providing food, advice, or protection. They not only acknowledge this publicly, but their heartfelt gratitude is evident as they speak. Even in the face of anti-Semitic actions of some, they have not forgotten those who once could have been, but instead, took great risks to do the right thing.

8. Research before casting a vote

Although Hitler became more radical with time, and the Nazi’s policies intensified to align with their need and purpose, the attitudes and intentions were never secret. In Hitler’s book, Mein Kampf, he made the plan to rid Germany of Jews was clear. The methods may have changed over time, but the goal was there all along. Had more people read his book, written while he was in jail for a failed coup of the government, perhaps fewer would have supported him. This is another lesson for today’s world. Do not without researching a candidate’s policies for yourself. Anyone candidate can be a charming orator. Don’t buy into the propaganda and advertisement. Research the issues, former votes when relevant, and political stance for yourself.

Any chance to listen to a Holocaust survivor speak should be treated like a treasured gift. After hearing one, you should feel a responsibility to pass on their lessons to future generations. It is really all they ask of you. Don’t let their stories die. Do not let the truths of the Holocaust become watered down with the passing of time. These amazing people survived despite incredible odds and lived for an important purpose to bear witness to the atrocities that can come from hatred, intolerance, and indifference. Elie Wiesel, famous survivor, writer, and peace maker, once said, “When you listen to a witness, you become a witness.” Become that witness and educate the next generation to preserve history and prevent its reoccurrence.

Listening to and watching a Holocaust survivor share his or her story can be life-changing. They spend their lives reliving the same nightmares to educate future generations. They ask only that you continue that mission when they no longer can.

N.Korea: We Don’t Follow Hitler, We’ll Kill Anyone Who Says Otherwise

Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

North Korean officials are angrily denying a report that their exalted ruler Kim Jong-Un used Adolf Hitler’s “Mein Kampf” as his leadership guide, and, according to AFP, are threatening to kill the authors of the report.

The article “North Korea looks towards Hitler and the Third Reich,” published by New Focus International, an online news portal operated by North Korean defectors, says Kim Jong-Un gave copies of “Mein Kampf” to his top officials, instructing them to study it as a leadership skills manual:

“Rumours have been spreading among the Pyongyang elite that Kim Jong-un made a close study of Hitler while at school in Switzerland, according to a second trusted North Korean source, a DPRK business representative and a frequent traveler between Pyongyang and China. Spreading rumors among the elite that reinforce a message delivered through other channels has long been a tactic of North Korea’s propagandists.”

Kim Jong-Un handed out translations of Hitler’s manifesto to officials at the time of his birthday in January, the report says, citing an unnamed North Korean official working in China.

“Mentioning that Hitler managed to rebuild Germany in a short time following its defeat in World War I, Kim Jong-Un issued an order for the Third Reich to be studied in depth and asked that practical applications be drawn from it,” the source was quoted as saying.

On Wednesday, the story was picked up by all major South Korean newspapers.

The North’s police called the report a “thrice-cursed crime” aimed at belittling the leader. The police agency then threatened to kill the “human scum” behind the article.

“We are… determined to take substantial measures to physically remove despicable human scum who are committing treasons,” it said in a statement carried by the state-run Korean Central News Agency.

“Sordid human scum will never be able to look up to the sky nor be able to find an inch of land to be buried after their death,” it said.

It also vowed to launch “merciless punishment of justice” against Seoul and Washington, accusing the two nations of encouraging the defectors to defame its ruler.

It appeara that the lessons in “Mein Kampf” have been well integrated.

Hitler’s popular musings, written in 1924 while the author was vacationing in a Bavarian prison, is a must-read anti-Semitic tract for Islamists, White Power folks and, now, post-adolescent North Korean despots.

What if They Mean What They Say?

Monday, March 11th, 2013

The U.S. generally makes allowance for verbal excesses from foreign governments, but if expressions of hatred and incitement to violence are actually harbingers of behavior, destruction and murderousness cannot be far behind.

At the U.N. Alliance of Civilizations [sic], Turkey’s Prime Minister equated Zionism with crimes against humanity. The American response was swift; speaking for himself and the administration, Kerry called the remark “objectionable.” But after expressing dismay, he called for nicer play.

“That said,” he commented, “Turkey and Israel are both vital allies. We want to see them work together to go beyond rhetoric and take concrete steps to change their relationship.” A State Department official concurred, saying the comment was “particularly offensive” and “complicates our ability to do all the things we want to do together.”

But what if Ergodan doesn’t want what the U.S. wants him to want — that is to say, he doesn’t want a changed relationship with Israel? What if harsh rhetoric and open political and financial support for Hamas — a U.S. designated terrorist organization — are part of Turkey’s regional Sunni Islamic ambition, which does not include Israel? What if Turkey’s prior cooperation was a phase to allow it to acquire political and military benefits?

In a similar vein, a few weeks ago, a North Korean diplomat told the U.N. Conference on Disarmament, “As the saying goes, a new-born puppy knows no fear of a tiger. South Korea’s erratic behavior would only herald its final destruction.” He added, “If the U.S. takes a hostile approach toward North Korea to the last, rendering the situation complicated, [we] will be left with no option but to take the second and third stronger steps in succession.” A North Korean general warned of the “miserable destruction” of the United States.

The U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Conference on Disarmament called the comments “profoundly disturbing,” and the Spanish ambassador said he was “stupefied.” Why?

Beginning with President Carter, American administrations have treated North Korea’s pursuit of nuclear capability as defensive: designed to keep South Korea and the U.S. from overthrowing the cultish regime of the North. The U.S. tells itself that since it harbors no plans for any such invasion, it can reassure North Korea on that point and thus lessen its determination to have nuclear capability – hence the U.S. offers food, fuel and a light water reactor, thinking those “gifts” will reassure North Korea of America’s benign intentions.

But what if North Korea is not defensive, but rather Kim Jong Un, like his predecessors, believes that the unification of the peninsula should happen under governance of the North? How then should we understand the diplomat and the general? And how should we understand North Korea’s latest nuclear test?

The British ambassador said of the North Korean diplomat’s remarks, “It cannot be allowed that we have expressions which refer to the possible destruction of U.N. member states.” That is, of course, patently untrue. The U.N. tolerates and sometimes applauds Iranian representatives who have called not for the “possible” destruction of a U.N. member state, Israel, but for its outright annihilation.

“The Zionist regime and the Zionists are a cancerous tumor,” Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said. “The nations of the region will soon finish off the usurper Zionists in the Palestinian land… In the new Middle East there will be no trace of the Americans and Zionists… Cancer must be eliminated from a body (the region).” For Qods Day last year Ahmadinejad told the Iranians, “Any freedom lover and justice seeker in the world must do its best for the annihilation of the Zionist regime in order to pave the path for the establishment of justice and freedom in the world.”

The P5+1, the five permanent U.N. Security Council members plus Germany who are negotiating with Iran, still seem to presume that Iran is pursuing nuclear capability for some reason other than to use it, and that it can, therefore, be dissuaded from developing it. But what if “annihilation of the Zionist regime” really is topmost in the minds of the Mullahs? What if they believe Israel has to disappear and they can make it happen? What will happen, then, when they get nuclear weapons, if they still really believe that?

It’s My Opinion: Bombs Vs. Benefits

Sunday, October 14th, 2012

Vice President Joe Biden recently spoke at two of the largest retirement villages in South Florida, Boca Raton’s Century Village and Tamarac’s Kings Point. Biden, of course, was representing Barack Obama’s bid for reelection in the forthcoming presidential election.

The visit came a day after Benjamin Netanyahu’s poignant speech at the United Nations. Netanyahu spoke of the dire threat posed by Iran’s nuclear capabilities. Netanyahu was dismayed by what he considers America’s tepid response to Iran.

The residents of these huge complexes are senior citizens and are predominantly Jewish Democrats. Most were alive during the time of the Holocaust. Some are survivors. Some are the children of survivors.

All are aware that the world misjudged what seemed to be a ranting madman. Adolph Hitler clearly stated what he had planned. He wrote it in his book, Mein Kampf. All are aware of another ranting madman. Iran’s Ahmadinejad has clearly stated that he wants to “wipe Israel off the map.” One would think that the target audience of Bidens’s talk would be hyper-vigilant to the implications. Apparently, though, they had other things on their minds.

The relationship between this American president and the prime minister of Israel has not been a good one. Although Obama has been to many Arab countries since his election four years ago, he has not visited Israel. Last year, Obama suggested that Israel withdraw to the 1967 lines. Just weeks ago he refused Netanyahu’s request for a meeting. Obama had problems with scheduling. He had fund raising events to attend and had promised to make an appearance on “The View.”

One might think the Jews in Biden’s audience would have been focused on Iran’s threat to Israel, and the lack of respect shown by Obama to Netanyahu, and used the opportunity of this visit to express their concern. Unfortunately, this did not prove to be true.

It seems the Jewish voters had other matters on their minds that outweighed the survival of the Jewish state. The Jews in Century Village and Kings Point were, for the most part, focused on Medicare and their assumption that their best bet for benefits lay in the hands of the Democratic Party. A resident was quoted in the Miami Herald as saying what many were thinking: “I’m not voting over Israel. I’m voting over Medicare.”

An American Jewish Committee poll shows 79 percent of Jewish voters in Florida to be disturbed by the events in Iran. Still, 69 percent of Jewish voters, according to the poll, were sticking with Obama and the Democrats.

The Torah teaches, “If I am not for myself, who will be for me?” The Jewish voters in Florida need to remember the corollary to this teaching – “If I am only for myself, what am I?” Altruistic motives aside, all Jews suffer when Jew hatred is allowed to fester unchecked.

The Jewish world just celebrated the High Holiday season, a time of collective introspection, celebration and identification. Hopefully, Jews will finally use these lessons to unite with the understanding that indeed “All Israel is responsible for one another.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/community/south-florida/its-my-opinion-bombs-vs-benefits/2012/10/14/

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