web analytics
April 19, 2014 / 19 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Memorial Day’

In Hebrew: ‘Reminder’

Monday, April 15th, 2013

תִּזְכּוֹרֶת If you already know a bit of Hebrew, you’re bound to know the word for to rememberלִזְכּוֹר, an active-simple פָּעַל verb of the root ז.כ.ר (z.k.r).

One of the words that the root ז.כ.ר generates is מַזְכֶּרֶת- souvenir (see earlier entry). Another is זִכָּרוֹן- memory or remembrance, as in the phrase,יוֹם הַזִּכָּרוֹן- The Day of Remembrance or Memorial Day.

Another word that the ז.כ.ר root produces is that for a reminderתִּזְכּוֹרֶת.

For example:

מִי שֶׁנִּמְצָא בָּאָרֶץ לֹא צָרִיךְ תִּזְכּוֹרֶת שֶׁהָעֶרֶב וּמָחָר יוֹם הַזִּכָּרוֹן לְחַלָלֵי מַעַרְכוֹת יִשְׂרָאֵל וּלְנִפְגְּעֵי פְּעֻלּוֹת הָאֵיבָה.
Whoever is in Israel (literally, the land) doesn’t need a reminder that this evening and tomorrow is the Day of Remembrance for Israeli Fallen Soldiers and Victims of Terrorism.
Visit Ktzat Ivrit.

Pearl’s Father: Execution Caused ‘Revolution’ against Barbarism

Monday, April 15th, 2013

Prof. Judea Pearl said at Israel’s Remembrance Day for Fallen Soldiers in Jerusalem Sunday night that the terrorists’’ brutal execution of his son Daniel “caused a revolution in our society’s struggle against barbarism.”

He added, “The notion of absolute good and bad was almost erased, but was reborn with the murder of Daniel in Pakistan.” Daniel Pearl, an American Jew who also held Israel citizenship, was working as the South Asia Bureau Chief for the Wall Street Journal when he was abducted in January 2002 by militant Islamic fundamentalists, while researching a story in Karachi, Pakistan.  Nine days after his abduction, Pearl was cruelly beheaded and the terrorists posted online a video in which Pearl stated, “My name is Daniel Pearl. I’m a Jewish American…My father is Jewish, my mother is Jewish, I’m Jewish”

Several months after his death, his wife Mariane gave birth to their son, Adam.

Jewish Agency chairman Natan Sharansky said at the ceremony, “We want to remember all the Jews who were killed in different countries around the world because of their pride as Jews and their connection to the State of Israel. This is one united front in which we stand shoulder to shoulder with IDF soldiers and the entire Jewish people. When those who hate us seek to attack Jews they view Israel as the target. When our enemies attempt to attack Israel and don’t succeed they attack Jewish communities around the world.”

Sharansky Says Yoni Netanyahu Was an Inspiration while in Jail

Sunday, April 14th, 2013

Yoni Netanyahu, the brother of Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu who was killed in the Entebbe rescue, was an inspiration to Natan Sharansky while imprisoned in a Soviet jail, the former Refusenik said Sunday.

Speaking to 5,000 Masa Israel Journey participants at a Remembrance Day for Fallen Soldiers ceremony, Sharansky said, “While in the Soviet prison, … I thought about the three Israeli sportsmen who had visited Russia and had bravely met with us. They told us that Israel was a place of great joy.

“I later heard that one of the three was killed in the Yom Kippur war. But, mostly I thought about Yoni Netanyahu. The fact that the State of Israel was prepared to send its soldiers to rescue Jews all over the world gave me great strength. Yoni was 29 when he was killed and was 29 when I was arrested. Every time that I felt that I didn’t have the strength to keep resisting the authorities, I thought about Yoni Netanyahu and it gave me the strength to keep going.”

The Silence on Israel’s Memorial Day

Sunday, April 14th, 2013

Tonight, Israel will mark Yom Hazikaron, its annual Memorial Day, known officially as the Day of Remembrance for Israeli Fallen Soldiers and Victims of Terrorism.  Arnold Roth delivered the following (in Hebrew) as a speech at a public Yom Hazikaron commemoration in the Jerusalem community where he and his wife and children live.

My daughter Malki z”l was murdered in August 2001.

In the years since then, I have met and spoken with politicians, journalists, diplomats and public figures from many countries. It has been a privilege to engage with them, to address their questions of how it is to live in a society where so many people have experienced personal loss from war.

It is much rarer to express those feelings to one’s own neighbors. What can be said to them that they do not know already?

Perhaps nothing, because we live our lives so close to each other and therefore we share many experiences.  We see each other on the bus and at the kanyon (shopping mall). Walking along the street, going to the youth center or the synagogue, waiting at the same traffic lights for the red light to become green.

With all that we share, it is inescapable that our stories are individual, personal, unique and non-standard. Our experiences in life are like that too: different from one another’s. The music that some of us enjoy is not so enjoyable to others. The same with food, with politics, with the color and style of our clothes, with the books we like to read.

I know very little about what is going on inside the heads of the people who stand on line with me at the supermarket. I expect that what they know about me is very little, too.

Each year, I ask myself: What are they thinking when all of us stand in silence as the siren to mark the minute of silence is sounding?

I know what I am thinking about. I know we are probably not thinking the same things.

There are some who will surely say that what we need to think about is the soldiers who paid the highest price in order to defend our land. Or about the heroes of Israel whose blood was shed so that we might gain our national independence.

How unusual is it to find an entire country standing absolutely still, not speaking, not driving, while an unnatural sound fills the air? And not just any unnatural sound, but the sound of the tzefira, the siren? A sound that, if we hear it on a different day, would cause our hearts to beat rapidly and our hands to become sweaty. A frightening sound.

And as we stand there, no trucks, no buses, no cars are moving.

Several million people, who cannot be persuaded to do something together at any other time, suddenly co-operate in doing something at precisely the same moment that brings no personal benefit to any of us. Why?

I feel deep gratitude to the men and women who fought to defend our country.

But it is terribly difficult for me to think about 25,578 korbanot (victims, deceased). I want to feel the pain of their lost futures. Their goodwill and their dedication to our land, our people and our history and the terrible result demand that I should try.

But in the end, it is a number that my mind simply cannot hold.

I have visited many countries. I have never seen anything like an entire nation of people come to a standstill, leaving their cars in the middle of the highway, standing there on the pavement with their heads bowed. I think it is one of the most powerful and moving sights imaginable.

Even as I struggle to think about the vast pain of an entire nation honoring the memory of thousands of its dead soldiers and police and terror victims, I ask myself: But what does it mean? What good does it do to remember?

There are, as I said, large differences between us. All of us can see that while some of us have paid a terrible personal price for the blessings in our lives, others appear to have been completely excused.

There are people who can explain this. Their explanations do not speak to me.

‘Israel Wants Peace, Enemies Want War,’ Says Netanyahu

Sunday, April 14th, 2013

”From the moment the state was established, it has not ceased to wish for peace with its neighbors and to the same degree, its enemies have not ceased from their aspiration to wipe it off the face of the earth” Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu said Sunday afternoon as Israel prepares to observe Remembrance Day for Fallen Soldiers.

The day is usually observed on the 4th of the Hebrew month of Iyar, which began Saturday night, but it was postponed one day to avoid desecration of the Sabbath. Because of the change, Yom Ha’atzmaut is being celebrated on Monday, one day later than usual, on the 6th of Iyar,

“We are here thanks to Israel’s fighters who joined the struggle for our existence, thanks to those who survived the wars and thanks to those who fell. We do not forget, even for a second, that we are here thanks to the fallen,” the Prime Minister added.

“Today, while the accumulated threats against the State of Israel are greater than in the past, both the IDF and our security services are stronger than ever. We will continue to strengthen our security, we will continue to aspire for peace with our neighbors, and we will continue to ensure the future of our country.”

Memorial Day — To Live and Die for Israel

Sunday, April 14th, 2013

I wrote this memoir few years ago:

In March of 1995 my friends and I were drafted to the Israeli army. We had passed some grueling tests and were accepted to the Paratrooper brigades, the Tzanchanim. The image of the red berets liberating the Western Wall was fused into our psyches like it was in so many young Israeli minds, and more than anything we wanted to serve our country honorably and to the best of our abilities. Six painful months of basic training were ahead of us. In this period of time our minds and bodies were converted from civilian use and become the property of the IDF. We learned to push the envelope of our individual human capacity, and to harness the great strength inherent in an indivisible platoon.

We kept our sights to the final day of basic training in which we would hike 86 kilometers, in utter silence with full infantry gear, up to Givat Ha-Tachmoshet, Ammunition Hill in Jerusalem where many Tzanchanim had perished in the 6 Day War, and where we would receive our very own red berets and be inducted into the ranks of the paratroopers.

However, one fine day in May, barely three months after we began basic training, the sergeant major came into our barracks with a large box. We had no clue what its contents were. The sergeant major proceeded to open the box, and much to our surprise, unveiled red berets for each one of us in the platoon. “You don’t deserve to be paratroopers yet,” he told us. “But tomorrow you will leave the base and think of yourselves as full-fledged Tzanchanim for one day. You will not get to keep these,” he added, “but wear them with pride and respect.”

The next day was Yom HaZikaron, Memorial Day, and the whole of the paratrooper brigade, thousands of men, would be released for one day to attend one of the many commemorations of fallen soldiers that took place in the cemeteries of this tiny nation. Each one of us was given precise directions to the cemetery and a plot number was also given to us. We were told that the plot number corresponded to a grave of a fallen paratrooper. We were ordered to stand next to that grave and next to the family of a young man who was once just like ourselves, wearing our red beret as he once did, and in a sense, to represent his memory and soul.

That next day, I had luck hitchhiking, the preferred mode of travel when in uniform. Hitchhiking was by no means a precise science, and though I had tweaked my “I’m a helpless soldier” stance to perfection, some days were better than others. I reached the gates of the cemetery about an hour early and the place was quiet and serene. I loitered at the gate and then wandered in. The large space echoed silence and only the birds chirped in the large trees. Nature had overtaken this resting place and many of the walls were covered in ivy. I tried listening to the graves and heard no cries of pain, no last words, and no fear of death. The dead, it seemed to me, had made peace with their fate, they were no longer bitter at having fallen so young. Alone amongst my dead I stood, a bit in a daydream, under the sun.

Soon, people began to arrive and I straightened my stance and made sure my beret was on right. I was nervous at meeting the family I was assigned to.

Who would they be?

How would they react to me?

Will they cry next to me?

Will they ask me who I am?

Most of all my soul wondered:

What is it like for a parent to stand on the grave of his child?

How would my parents feel if I were that child?

How would I feel, if it were my child?

I thought about my own mother and her reservations about my army service. Soon after, I spotted a family of three: father, mother and son, heading in my general direction. It was my family.

They greeted me kindly, and indeed, the father asked me who I was and where did I serve. The mother, who had been through this before, brought out some fruits and water to nourish the soldier with the red beret standing in front of her, and though she looked at me, I could see that her mind was far away, and that I was a painful reminder of her longing to nourish her own child.

Daniel Pearl’s Father to Light Day Memorial Flame

Tuesday, April 9th, 2013

The father of the late Jewish journalist Daniel Pearl will light one the memorial flames at the Memorial Day Ceremony in Jerusalem, the day before Independence Day.

Pearl was kidnapped and brutally murdered in Pakistan while researching a story on Islamic radicals for The Wall Street Journal.

Nine days after his abduction, Pearl was cruelly beheaded. In a video which released his killers, Pearl was filmed stating, “My name is Daniel Pearl. I’m a Jewish American… My father is Jewish, my mother is Jewish, I’m Jewish”

His father, Prof. Judea Pearl will light the memorial flame at the ceremony that honors the memory of Jews killed in terror attacks and anti-Semitic incidents across the globe, in addition to Israel’s fallen soldiers and victims of terror attacks in Israel.

Daniel Pearl’s wife Marianne, and his son Adam, who was born several months after his father’s murder, also will be present.

The IDF Honors 22,993 Fallen Soldiers

Wednesday, April 25th, 2012

The IDF honors, on Israel’s official Memorial Day for Fallen Soldiers and Victims of Terrorism, the memory of 22,993 fallen soldiers who have given their lives since 1860.

Over the past year 126 soldiers were added to the count.

The number of bereaved Israeli families in 2012 is 10,524 including 2,396 orphans and 4,992 widows.

Israeli Memorial Day events began Tuesday night at 8:00 p.m. with honorary ceremonies held across the country.

In a letter to IDF soldiers and commanders, the Chief of the General Staff Lt. Gen. Gantz wrote, “Another year passed, another year of standing guard, of relentless, exuberant, hard work ensuring the security of Israeli citizens. A year passed and again we stand at Memorial Day ceremonies, by graves of fallen brothers, facing monuments with a endless and unfathomable rows of names of the fallen.”

“A year passed, and Memorial Day once again lays its heavy silence on the entire Israeli nation. This year as well, the IDF is missing soldiers among its ranks, grieving but powerful, remembering thousands of fallen commanders and soldiers who fell throughout the years,” wrote Lt. Gen. Gantz.

The Chief of Staff added that “on this special day, we must look at ourselves, our units, and the IDF at large and ask: Are we fulfilling the mission of our generation? Are we bringing Israel to safe shores?”

“We see the IDF as a strong, determined, intimidating, technologically advanced, sophisticated military that can overcome any challenge at this monumental hour – when the Middle East is in turmoil, and terror organizations are relentlessly working to harm our civilians.”

Lt. Gen. Gantz concluded his letter, saying “We have another sacred duty – standing alongside the families of our fallen brothers and supporting all bereaved families. Parents, siblings, spouses and children who lost the dearest of all in a single day, and paid the heaviest price for the life and independence of Israel. Today, like every day, we embrace them as one powerful family – the family that is Israel Defense Forces, grieving over its fallen and embracing them forever.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/the-idf-honors-22993-fallen-soldiers/2012/04/25/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: