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April 25, 2014 / 25 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Michael Bloomberg’

Mayoral Candidates Salute Israel and NY Jews

Monday, June 3rd, 2013

More than 35,000 marchers and 17 bands marched Sunday with New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the city’s mayoral candidates in saluting Israel and the Jewish community in New York.

Mr. Weiner, who is the only Jewish candidate running in the Democratic primary, was cheered by many marchers and onlookers, but many also booed by some who still remember the Twitter scandal. “This is a great day,” the candidate said as he marched, according to Politicker. “Before I stepped aside, I had come to this parade every single year. It’s one of [the] real joys of my schedule, so it’s great to be back.”

“Am Yisrael Chai! Am Yisrael Chai!” he bellowed every few feet. “God bless America! Am Yisrael Chai! Welcome to New York!”

Bill de Blasio. Photo: Jacob Kornbluh

Bill de Blasio. Photo: Jacob Kornbluh

Joe Lhota. Photo: Jacob Kornbluh

Joe Lhota. Photo: Jacob Kornbluh

Bloomberg Rated as World’s 13th Richest Billionaire

Monday, March 4th, 2013

New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg’s worth is now around $27 billion, according to Forbes, placing him as the 13th richest billionaire in the world.

At the top of the list for the second year in a  row is Mexico’s telecom entrepreneur Carlos Slim Helu and his family, whose worth is an astonishing $73 billion.

Oracle CEO Larry Ellison, who was born to an unwed Jewish mother, is in firth place at $43 billion. He is the world’s richest Jew, followed by the 10th richest man, French businessman and art collector Bernard Arnault and his family, with an estimated worth of $29 billion.

Gambling casino mogul Sheldon Adelson was in 15th place two spots behind Bloomberg, with a word of $26.5 billion.

The world’s rich-poor gap continues to grow. The Forbes list of billionaires has grown to 1,426 names, whose collective net worth is $5.4 trillion.

For comparison, the US national debt is now at $16.7 trillion.

War on Everything But Islamic Terror

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

Over a decade after thousands of New Yorkers were murdered by Muslim terrorists, the city’s mayor is declaring victory in the War on Salt. Next up he plans to wage a spring offensive on Styrofoam cups. After that, who knows?

We live in surreal times. In the Middle Ages, cats and rats were put on trial. In this modern age, we began by waging wars on poverty and drugs, both of which we lost, and have now retreated to fighting wars on food ingredients, the bags we carry them in and the containers out of which we eat and drink them.

There’s no telling what surreal enemy our wise and brilliant leaders will declare war on next. Shoes? Pepper? Umbrellas? Mathematics? The color blue?

There’s just no way to know anymore.

The United States has lost the War in Afghanistan, a minor matter that no news outlet can find the time to report on because they’re too busy covering a breaking story about a Republican Senator taking a sip of a water. Maybe a War on Water can be next. Was there a Styrofoam cup involved? It’s time for one of those hard-hitting investigations that reminds us what a tragedy it will be when the last newspaper is strangled with the entrails of the last news network and the media’s commitment to serious journalism is finally replaced by pictures of cats, wardrobe malfunctions and mutual accusations of racism. (And we won’t even notice when it finally happens.)

But who can find the time to fight a war against Islamic terrorists, when there are more pressing wars to be fought? Like a war on being fat.

Michelle Obama declared that obesity was a national security threat. And the Pentagon, which now exists only to ratify the latest leftist social experiment from the White House, whether it’s Green Energy, Gay Marriage or bombing the fattest state in the country (Michigan), issued a report agreeing that snack foods posed the greatest threat to the military since Global Warming and the lack of transgender toilets on submarines.

The military has been unable to identify the Fort Hood Massacre as a terrorist attack and fires any instructor who talks about Islam as anything other than a wonderful religion of peace practiced by our closest allies in Saudi Arabia and on board a plane headed for the Pentagon, but the political generals are always ready, willing and able to jump on any truly serious national security threat. If only Iran began developing the world’s biggest chocolate bar, then the bombing raids would begin as soon as the chocolate enrichment process reached the caramel-nougat line.

Faced with a seemingly unwinnable conflict against the Soviet Union, American leaders began to retreat into smaller social wars that were actually far more unwinnable. Those wars have also gone the way of the dodo. The War on Poverty is one with the ages and the War on Drugs is usually only mentioned in a pejorative context.

But the same government that couldn’t get a small percentage of the population to stop doing cocaine and heroin imagines that it will somehow be able to compel 11-year-old boys to stop eating candy and drawing guns. A heroin addict is nothing compared to a normal growing boy seeking a sweet sugar rush before playing a game of cops and robbers. The authorities would have better luck getting Obama’s campaign staff to Say No to Drugs.

The government that couldn’t stop drug use or defeat Islamic terrorism has set its sights on something easier. Taking candy from a baby.

During his State of the Union Address, in between promising to create hubs full of 3D printers and drag every three-year-old to a preschool so he can get a head start on being indoctrinated in important knowledge skills, like recycling and understanding white privilege, Zero Hussein announced that the mission in Afghanistan had been completed because Al Qaeda was defeated. Then he explained that while the war was over, American soldiers would have to go on staying in Afghanistan to continue fighting the already defeated Al Qaeda in a war that was no longer a war, but an extended vacation with shooting.

Since Al Qaeda did not have a significant presence in Afghanistan at any time during his maladministration, defeating it was fairly easy, and true to form it only cost thousands of lives. But somehow it still isn’t defeated. Still if fighting things that don’t exist gets applause, put your hands together for the War on Global Warming, which has recently been scaled down to Climate Change, which means that any time the weather changes, it’s probably due to people using the wrong kinds of light bulbs, driving the wrong kinds of cars and not paying enough attention to Al Gore’s latest plan to fill up the pockets of his cheap over sized suit and those of his Wall Street buddies who care almost as much about the environment as they do about feminism, racism and wiping out entire economies.

The Fat Nanny State

Tuesday, June 5th, 2012

http://sultanknish.blogspot.co.il/2012/06/fat-nanny-state.html

It’s easy to dismiss New York City Mayor Bloomberg’s latest nanny state hiccup as the control-freak antics of a powerful man –but that would be missing the point. Bloomberg did not come up with the idea of banning sodas during a spa session on his private island. His implementation of it may be more overtly obnoxious, but the idea that there is a national health crisis that can only be solved by getting people to stop eating sugary foods, is ubiquitous among social policy wonks and national experts on telling people what to do.

In 2007, a conference on obesity was held at George Washington University, sponsored by the Stop Obesity Alliance and the Obesity Association. The Stop Obesity Alliance may sound like a silly afterthought of a group, but its steering committee members include AHIP, the trade group for the health insurance industry; AMGA, the trade association for health care groups; SEIU, one of the largest unions in the country; and NBGH, a business health group representing major companies like Apple, FedEx, Kellogg, Unilever and Walmart.

It was no wonder then that virtually every Democratic and Republican candidate running for office either showed up in person, or sent a proxy to explain how their administration was going to fight obesity.

“The next president must commit to fighting America’s obesity problem and possess the experience to win the fight,” Governor Bill Richardson said, and vowed to make fighting obesity one of his top priorities.

You might be laughing, but don’t. The obesity epidemic buzzword has penetrated every major company, as well as every level of government and academia. That translates into a policy bulldozer with private-public partnerships that will control every aspect of your life.

When think-tanks convince corporations that they’re losing money because of obesity, they sponsor trade associations that invite politicians down to explain what they’re going to do about it. Health insurance companies have crunched the numbers and decided that they can save billions if the government manages to make people lose weight. Corporations that employ a lot of people and pay for their health insurance think they can save a fortune on health insurance if employee obesity is cut. They have their own employee incentives, but mostly they want the government to do something about it.

Why do you think the 2012 election came down to a race between ObamaCare and RomneyCare? Because the power players agree that we need national health care; they only disagree over what kind of national health care we need. Just like they agree that we need “immigration reform,” tolerance for Islam, and a War on Terror that doesn’t disrupt international trade. We don’t need those things, but they do, and they are determined to force them down our throats.

To understand the genesis of Bloomberg’s lunacy, you have to go back to groups like the Stop Obesity Alliance. And it’s not the only such group. There’s the Campaign to End Obesity, whose board includes executives from major health companies and non-profits, including Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson and Humana. Every time you hear another talking head going on about the dangers of obesity to America, he’s repeating talking points lifted from “F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future”, a report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the country’s largest health care foundation, which doles out 400 million dollars a year in grants. Its primary focus… obesity.

“F as in Fat” includes extensive material on government legislation, everything from soda taxes to menu labeling to “complete streets programs,” which New Yorkers will recognize as the melange of bike lanes that squeeze out cars; what they don’t know is that it is used to fight obesity. HR 1780: The Safe and Complete Streets Act is a congressional bill that would turn every city into the same nightmare of snarled traffic and no parking.

Around the same time that policy men and women were telling the Stop Obesity Alliance what they would do about fat people, there were warnings in the U.K. that obesity would bankrupt the NHS, and Australia’s Labor Party vowed to tackle the “national obesity crisis” as a study claimed that 95 percent of Australians were “unfit.” The hysteria is worldwide.

Electionshpiel Special

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2008

Question: For whom will you be voting in next month’s presidential election?


 

 


Election?! You mean in just a few weeks I’ll longer get to be the decider? So that’s why Laura is so busy packing up boxes! I’m not sure whom I will vote for. I liked Rudy Giuliani’s spirit during 9/11 and I admire Mike Huckabee’s conservative nature, but one thing’s for sure: John Kerry is certainly not going to get my vote.

 – George Bush, president


 

 


As someone who was born an African-American male, I am so proud of Barack Obama, and I do think we are ready to see a black man as president. But I can also relate to Sarah Palin as a white woman, and I feel it’s about time we had a female vice president. Color me confused.

 – Michael Jackson, entertainer


 

 


I still think I would make a great president and perhaps when I challenge President Obama for the Democratic nomination in 2012, the American public will get it right and vote for me. Don’t tell anyone, but I never fully cleaned out my office from when Bill and I were in the White House. I knew I’d eventually be back.

 – Hillary Clinton, U.S. senator (D-NY)


 

 

 


Frankly, I don’t see why George Bush can’t run for another term. Who says there has to be a limit? If the man feels like he can put in another 4 years, he should go for it. Heck, why even have elections? I’m looking into that question as well.

 – Michael Bloomberg, mayor of New York

 

 

This week’s column is intended for satiric purposes only.

13th Ave., Brooklyn

Wednesday, July 25th, 2007

Question: How do you rate Michael Bloomberg’s performance as mayor of New York?

 

 


I just moved to New York a year ago. The last time I was here, seven years ago, I got a very bad impression of the city. I think Bloomberg has totally changed the city. Scholastically, New York offers many opportunities for struggling students. There’s no doubt about it: New York is an expensive place, but if you can make a living here, it’s the best place to live.


 – Avi Lieber, student

 

 

 


Bloomberg has been doing a fine job as mayor. He’s improved New York financially; we are now out of the red. Since he’s been mayor my commute has become pricier, but a lot smoother too. He stills needs to work on education reform. Many people would like to see him run for president, and I’m one of them.


 – Duvi Spira, warehouse manager

 

 

 

 


He isn’t as good as Giuliani but he’s far better than Dinkins. I do admit that he has performed better than I expected. I thought he didn’t have enough political experience, just business, but I see now that he knows what he’s doing. He improved the quality of life for New Yorkers; I personally know people who quit smoking because of his anti-cigarette campaign. 


 – Yitzchak Barber, student

 

 

 


He is a great mayor. Crime is down in the city and revenue is up. Many have complained about the ticket blitz from sanitation and the DMV, but in the long run this could be a good thing by making people think twice before breaking the law.


 – Shlomo Maghen, student

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/potpourri/13th-ave-brooklyn/2007/07/25/

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