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November 28, 2014 / 6 Kislev, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘minister’

How to Say “Beg Persistently” in Hebrew

Monday, December 3rd, 2012

To beg, in Hebrew, is לְהִתְחַנֵּן .

But there’s a certain type of begging that doesn’t let up. To beg in such a manner is לְהַפְצִיר .

This word is used, albeit in a different verb form, in Biblical Hebrew, in contexts where the speaker is imploring someone to accept a favor.

An example from the Torah portion read last week:

קַח נָא אֶת בִּרְכָתִי אֲשֶׁר הֻבָאת לָךְ, כִּי חַנַּנִי אֱלֹהִים וְכִי יֶשׁ-לִי כֹל; וַיִּפְצַר בּוֹ, וַיִּקָּח. (בְּרֵאשִׁית ל”ג:י”א) Please take my gift (literally, blessing) that is brought to you, for G-d has graced me and has given me everything; and he begged him, and he took. (Genesis 33:11)

And an example in Modern-Hebrew usage:

מַנְהִיגִים רַבִּים מַפְצִירִים בְּרֹאשׁ הַמֶּמְשָׁלָה לֹא לְהַתְקִיף. Many leaders are begging the prime minister persistently not to attack.

להפציר, in its modern usage, is an active-causative הִפְעִיל verb. In its Biblical-Hebrew usage, it’s an active-simple פָּעַל verb.

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Rejected by Voters, Meridor Contemplating Run for Jerusalem Mayor

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

An initiative of some members of the Jerusalem Likud branch could help keep soon-to-be-former MK Dan Meridor gainfully employed: The Begin Heritage Group, led by Avi Moyal, Yoram Gamish and Jerusalem city council member Meir Turgeman, yesterday proposed to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that he would throw his support behind Meridor, who had been rejected by Likud primary voters, to become Jerusalem’s mayor in the October, 2013 elections. Turgeman, who is also member of the Likud Center, told Israel Today that “Netanyahu welcomed the idea.”

Sources in the prime minister’s circle said the issue “has not been discussed,” and that, in any case, “the prime minister said that he wants Dan Meridor at his side in the next government he would put together, God willing.”

Israeli DM Ehud Barak Quits Politics, Leaves Door Open For Comeback

Wednesday, November 28th, 2012

At a dramatic press conference in Tel Aviv on Monday, Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak announced his resignation from politics.

Barak said he would remain in his post until the establishment of the next government, following the January 22 elections. While he dispelled speculation suggesting that he would join up with other parties, Barak left the door open for a comeback by not saying explicitly that he would not return to politics. He said he was “at peace” with his decision, but that it did not come “without its misgivings.”

The political echelon responded quickly to Barak’s announcement, with Labor Chairwoman Shelly Yachimovich expressing her sorrow over Barak’s resignation even before the press conference ended.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu also voiced his appreciation for the outgoing minister, saying, “I thank him for his cooperation and I very much appreciate his longtime contribution to the security of the state.”

But not all the responses were sympathetic. MK Danny Danon (Likud) issued a statement shortly after the announcement, declaring, “Thank God we are rid of this nuisance.”

Likud minister Yuli Edelstein echoed his colleague’s sentiments, saying, “Today is a day of independence for Likud.”

“Barak will go down in the annals of Israel’s governments as the worst defense minister in the history of the Jewish settlement enterprise. His conduct was rife with egotistical and political considerations, all at the expense of the Jewish settlers,” said Edelstein. “I wouldn’t be surprised if, at the first opportunity, he will find a reason to return to politics and to his evil ways.”

The Strong Israel faction, headed by rightists Aryeh Eldad and Michael Ben-Ari, also issued a celebratory response, adding that “now Netanyahu and [Foreign Minister Avigdor] Lieberman will be able to approve all the construction plans for Judea and Samaria that had gotten bogged down on Barak’s desk. Or, alternately, it may emerge that Barak was only a fig leaf and that it was the prime minister himself who was responsible for the mistreatment of the settlers.”

Some on the other side of the political spectrum were no less critical of the resigning minister. “Barak played a dual role in the political system,” said Meretz Chairwoman Zahava Gal-On. “I commended him as the one who normally blocked extreme policies, but sometimes he was the one who spearheaded extreme moves and pushed them forward.”

Hadash Chairman Dov Khenin said, “Ehud Barak was the pillar that made possible the existence of the most extreme rightist government in Israel’s history…. Barak’s political maneuvering cannot mask his culpability for the four difficult years of frozen diplomacy, the damage he caused to the possibility of peace with the Palestinians and the general economic and social deterioration.”

The news even elicited a response from Hamas spokesman Fawzi Barhoum, who said Barak’s resignation was proof that Israel’s recent Gaza Strip offensive, which Barak led, had been a failure.

Barak’s political career may have been over even if he had not decided to retire. His small, centrist Independence Party faction was polling poorly and it is possible Barak would not have made it into the next Knesset had he decided to run again.

As prime minister from 1999 to 2001, Barak withdrew Israeli forces from southern Lebanon and offered unprecedented Israeli concessions, including in Jerusalem, to Yasir Arafat and the Palestinians at the unsuccessful Camp David peace summit. In the 2001 elections following the outbreak of the second intifada, Barak was soundly defeated by Ariel Sharon and then resigned as head of the Labor Party.

Barak mounted a political comeback in 2007, recapturing the leadership of a weakened Labor Party. He returned to government as defense minister, a post from which he has emphasized the threat from Iran’s nuclear program and ordered two military operations in Gaza – 2008’s Cast Lead and the recent Pillar of Defense.

– Israel Hayom/JNS; JTA; Jewish Press staff

Feiglin Says Rivalry with Netanyahu Is Over, But Two-State Solution Could Split the Party

Tuesday, November 27th, 2012

If things at the Likud stay the way they appear today, we should all start getting used to saying “MK Moshe Feiglin.” The relentless and almost disturbingly patient leader of the Manhigut Yehudit (Jewish Leadership) faction in the Likud, has finally managed to get himself elected—and stay elected—into a realistic spot on the combined Likud-Israel Beiteinu list.

Feiglin, who started his political path as leader of a civil disobedience movement against the Oslo Accords, back in 1994, realized fairly early on that there was a kind of perpetual dichotomy taking place within Israel’s largest right-wing party. When you go to Likud events – after joining the Likud party in 2000 he would tell anyone who would listen – you see a sea of yarmulkes and headscarves in the audience, while the dais is populated with non-observers.

Above and beyond his own candidacy for the Knesset, Feiglin sought to alter this insufferable imbalance, encouraging fellow frumies, many, but not all of them, from the “wrong” side of the green line, to register as Likud members and start voting for religious candidates.

One would think that a candidate who brings in thousands of new potential voters would be welcomed with a warm embrace, but the fact is that Feiglin and his highly organized camp were greeted as a kind of Mongol invasion. In fact, Limor Livnat, today minister of culture & sport, once called Feiglin’s movement “a hostile takeover of the Likud.” And party chief Benjamin Netanyahu outmaneuvered the “Feiglins” at least twice so far, using his prerogative as chairman to drop the candidate’s name from his rightfully-earned realistic spot to the political dungeon that lurks beyond the 40th spot.

Now that he’s won the 15th spot on the Likud list in yesterday’s primaries, MK hopeful Moshe Feiglin told Army Radio that his relationship with the prime minister has improved. “The PM and I are in the same movie,” he said, using an Israeli colloquialism meaning on the same page. “The relationship is good, I intend to cooperate with the prime minister, the prime minister believes in democracy and in that which the Likud represents – and so it will be.”

He added: “The Likud has a list that represents Israel’s society in its entirety, it is a realistic list which will continue the good works of the Netanyahu government.”

Of course, those ‘good works’ included a period of a housing freeze in Jewish towns in Judea and Samaria, the uprooting of two whole neighborhoods, and a pitifully indecisive campaign against the Hamas in Gaza which ended with the legitimization of the terrorist government and with no strategic gains for Israel. But Feiglin is hopeful:

“The entire public in this country has become more nationalist,” he said. “Those loony notions of the Oslo accords which have led to the shelling of Tel Aviv and Jerusalem – the public has sobered up from them.”

Late last night, Netanyahu shared his regret over the fact that ministers Beni Begin and Dan Meridor have not been elected to a spot within the top-20 (Likud is sharing the slate with FM Avigdor Liberman’s Israel our Home 15-member list in an alternate-feed method, so that the Likud candidate who reached the first spot after Netanyahu, Education Minister Gideon Sa’ar, will be in spot number 3, after Liberman, and the next Likudnik will be in spot number 5, after Liberman’s number 2. It’s called the “zipper” system…). Netanyahu also promised to invite both Begin and Meridor to serve as ministers in his new government even if they aren’t Knesset Members.

The law permits Israeli prime ministers to include anyone they wish in ministerial positions, provided they receive a vote of confidence from the Knesset. But practical considerations, such as awarding ministries to coalition partners—who in turn use them to create patronage positions for their followers—usually prevent the proliferation of ministers who are not elected members of Knesset.

Take THAT, constitutional separation of powers…

Accordingly, Feiglin told Army Radio this morning that he didn’t think Netanyahu would make good on his promise to Begin and Meridor, mostly because, in the end, he will have to respect the public sentiment that sent them home.

Dan Meridor has been associated with the left wing of the party, and was extremely useful to Netanyahu in dealing with the center and even left-of-center. But, as Feiglin has observed, the Likud membership has made it extremely difficult for the prime minister to try and establish a coalition with, say, Labor.

His and Hers Ballot Boxes

Monday, November 26th, 2012

Israeli Prime Minister and head of the Likud party Benjamin Netanyahu cast his vote yesterday, November 24, 2012, together with his wife, Sara, at the Likud primary elections. I suppose he voted in the box marked 1 and she in the box marked 2.

The primaries ended up being such a holy mess, the Likud is considering a suit against the computer company that organized them. Our own Malka Fleisher was there and reported on the three-ring circus scenes. But I watched Netanyahu speaking to the TV cameras early in the day, saying everything was going smoothly, problem-free. He was bright eyed and jolly, leader and commander in chief.

I suppose after coming out of the Gaza pillar of whatever explaining how everything went really well there, all our initial goals achieved, mission accomplished, describing a crazy out of control mess at the polls as problem-free should be no challenge at all for our prime minister.

Hey, and no one got killed at the Likud primaries! Well, so far, anyway.

To paraphrase the late Abbie Hoffman, Netanyahu gives cynicism a bad name…

Officials: We Could Avoid the Casualties if the Public Obeyed Instructions

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

Lachish Region Police Chief, Commander Alon Levavi, was at the scene in Kiryat Malachi and was adamant in his statement: “If the public had followed the instructions in this case (referring to the three killed and six injured from 2 Grad hits), we probably could have reported fewer casualties.”

Internal security Minister Yizhak Aharonovitch said: “We should applaud the military and the Iron Dome system.”

Aharonovitch added: “There is no magic solution to prevent rockets from falling on population centers. Occasionally a rocket will fall. But when I come here and see so many civilians just loitering around, I think it’s irresponsible.”

Regarding the Gaza operation, the minister said: “In my opinion, it will not end in two or three days.”

Decision Time: Netanyahu Cabinet to Discuss Israeli Reaction to Gaza Shelling

Monday, November 12th, 2012

As preparations are on the way for a harsh response in Gaza, the campaign to present Israel’s position in the world is already being waged, and the prime minister appears to have divided his day between monitoring the military and the PR efforts.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will meet today, Monday, with a host of foreign ambassadors to prepare them for the possibility of an all out Israeli attack in Gaza. Sources close to the prime minister said that “Abu Mazen (nom de guerre of PA President Mahmoud Abbas) says he is the sole representative of the Palestinian people, but at the same time he is refusing to take responsibility for what is happening in Gaza.”

Chief of Staff Benny Gantz Dan on Monday morning discussed the appropriate response to the continued rocket fire from Gaza, against a backdrop of many public figures calling for a severe IDF response.

“The Palestinians interpret the Israeli restraint as weakness,” a senior officer told Walla News, expressing the feeling among the IDF leadership. Meanwhile, the Egyptians are pressuring Israel to avoid broad attack in the Gaza Strip.

Ganz began his discussions very early this morning, with Chief of Operations Major General Yoav Har-Even, head of military intelligence Aviv Kochavi and Southern Command Chief Tal Russo. They reviewed the latest developments in the Gaza Strip, as terrorists continued launching rockets at Israel, and examined the variety of responses available.

A senior officer said this morning that the time lag between rounds of violence in the Gaza Strip has decreased dramatically in recent months, and that “terror organizations in Gaza believe they have a tail wind from Turkey and Egypt.”

A security official said this morning that the accumulation of events, in addition to the explosive charge along the perimeter fence igniting the tunnel inferno last week, and events not yet released for publication, require a clear response to deter the other side.

Meanwhile, other voices within the security apparatus have argued that the last two rounds of fighting in the south came as the IDF responded to attacks on soldiers, but finally it was civilian residents in the South who paid the price.

“It’s time to change the equation,” said another senior officer, saying Israel should attack “despite the pressure exerted by the Egyptians not to retaliate for shooting, just because no one has died yet on the Israeli side.”

While the shooting continues, on Sunday night the prime minister held a meeting with top security officials, including Chief of Staff Gantz, to assess the Gaza situation, as well as the heating up of the border with Syria. In a follow-up to what he had stated during his cabinet meeting, Netanyahu reiterated that the world must understand that Israel cannot sit back and absorb the attacks on its civilian population.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/decision-time-netanyahu-cabinet-to-discuss-israeli-reaction-to-gaza-shelling/2012/11/12/

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