web analytics
December 10, 2016 / 10 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Mohamed Morsi’

Radical, Democratic Changes to Egypt’s Constitution, MBs Out

Monday, August 19th, 2013

The technical committee has been assigned the task of “amending” Egypt’s 2012 Muslim-Brothers inspired constitution is almost finished, Al Ahram reported. The committee is headed by Interim President Adly Mansour’s legal advisor, Ali Awad.

In a press conference Sunday, Awad told the press that the committee will finish its work Monday, and the new draft constitution will be announced Wednesday. Al Ahram quotes the basic instruction given the authors of the new document: “Fundamental changes must be introduced to 2012 Islamist-backed constitution.”

By fundamental, they mean no Muslim Brothers in politics, ever again.

“The 2012 constitution was drafted under the former regime of the Muslim Brotherhood to grant Islamists an upper hand and a final say in Egypt’s political future, and this must be changed now,” Ahram quotes a committee source. “When the people revolted 30 June, their main goals were not confined to removing Mohamed Morsi from power, but also changing the fundamental pillars of the religious tyranny the Muslim Brotherhood regime tried its best to impose on Egypt.”

The source revealed that the new constitution must impose a ban on political parties based on religious foundations.

The source explained that “the anticipated ban gained momentum after the committee received requests and proposals from more than 400 political, economic and social institutions, pressing hard for the necessity of safeguarding Egypt against Islamist factions trying to change the civil nature of the country into a religious oligarchy.”

Except that – surprise, surprise, despite the anti-Brotherhood sentiment common to the new masters of Egypt, the source says the new constitution “will keep Article 2 of 2012’s Islamist-backed constitution — which states that Islamic Sharia is the main source of legislation — in place.”

This, according to committee chairman Ali Awad, is done “in order to stress the Islamic identity of Egypt.”

According to the source, most political institutions have recommended that “if it is necessary to keep the Islamic Sharia article in place as a nod to Islamists like El-Nour, it is by no means necessary to maintain the 2012 constitution’s separate article (Article 219) that delivers an interpretation of Islamic Sharia.”

Article 219 of the 2012 constitution states: “The principles of Islamic Sharia include its generally-accepted interpretations, its fundamental and jurisprudential rules, and its widely considered sources as stated by the schools of Sunna and Gamaa.”

Not any more. They’re also going to scrap the Shura Council, the upper house of parliament, that was created in 1980 by late President Anwar El-Sadat to befriend his Islamist foes. They shot him anyway. The MB exploited its majority in the council in 2012 to “Brotherhoodise national press institutions and the state-owned Radio and Television Union (known as Maspero) and gain legislative powers to Islamise society.”

Sources are saying there will be radical changes of articles aimed at regulating the performance of the High Constitutional Court and media institutions. “We aim to reinforce the independence of these institutions and not to face any more intimidation by ruling regimes,” the source said. He also indicated that, “The electoral system is also expected to see a complete overhaul in order not to cause any discrimination against independents or come in favor of party-based candidates.”

And another noteworthy change: Article 232 of the 2012 constitution, imposing a ban on leading officials of Mubarak’s defunct ruling National Democratic Party (NDP), will be annulled.

So, it appears the Egyptians are quite capable of taking care of their legal affairs without nasty interventions from their patron wannabes in Washington. Perhaps it would be best for the U.S. to shut up for a couple of weeks and not meddle?

Yori Yanover

Muslim Brotherhood Tweet on Jews Aimed at Jon Stewart (Video)

Thursday, April 4th, 2013

Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood tweeted a message – believed to be directed at “Daily Show” host Jon Stewart – linking to a video alleging that Jews control the U.S. media.

Max Fisher of the Washington Post wrote on his blog that the link was aimed at Stewart after he devoted a segment of his popular Comedy Central program to criticizing Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi for jailing popular Egyptian TV host and political satirist Bassem Youssef, nicknamed “the Jon Stewart of Egypt.” Youssef was released on bail and will face trial after being arrested over the weekend for criticizing Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood.

The link was from a clip in Arabic from the Al Jazeera Arabic network featuring former CNN host Rick Sanchez alleging that Jews control the media and that Stewart, who is Jewish, does not belong to a real minority group.

“I’m telling you that everybody who runs CNN is a lot like Stewart, and a lot of people who run all the other networks are a lot like Stewart, and to imply that somehow they, the people in this country who are Jewish, are an oppressed minority? Yeah,” Sanchez said in the September 2010 broadcast.

The U.S. Embassy in Cairo tweeted the “Daily Show” link of the segment ripping Morsi, which the Muslim Brotherhood in a tweet called “Another undiplomatic & unwise move by @USEmbassyCairo, taking sides in an ongoing investigation & disregarding Egyptian law & culture,” Fisher reported.



JTA

Morsi on Satirist’s Arrest: I Didn’t Do It

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013

Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi on Wednesday reiterated his government’s commitment to freedom of expression, and insisted his office is not responsible for the investigation of satirist Bassem Youssef, the “Egyptian Jon Stewart,” which raised international protest, most notably from Jon Stewart.

“The presidency reiterates the importance of freedom of expression and fully respects press freedom,” Morsi’s office said in a statement cited by AFP.

It denied having filed any complaint against Youssef, whose popular show Albernameg often lampoons Egyptian politicians and other public figures, including clerics.

At this point, Youssef is out on bail and facing charges of insulting Morsi and Islam, as well as a new investigation for “threatening public security.”

“The presidency has not filed any complaint against stand-up comedian Bassem Youssef,” Morsi’s office said, explaining that “the current well-publicized claims were initiated by citizens rather than the presidency.”

Wherein lies the catch: under Egypt’s legal system, anyone can file their complaints with the public prosecutor, who then decides whether there is enough evidence or public concern to refer the case to trial. And if the same public prosecutor sees fit, suspects can be detained even during this initial stage of the investigation.

Hiding behind this very thin veil of “the public made me do it,” there has been a soaring number of legal complaints against Egyptian journalists since Morsi and the Muslim Brothers have won the election, making Morsi’s claims of commitment to freedom of expression all but a cynical joke.

Freedom of expression was one of the key demand of the millions of Egyptian demonstrators who toppled the Mubarak regime in 2011.

The United States government has expressed “real concerns” about the direction being taken by the Egyptian government regarding Youssef’s case.



Yori Yanover

Morsi Empowers Army to Arrest Protesters but Thousands on Both Sides March

Wednesday, December 12th, 2012

Tens of thousands of Morsi supporters gathered peacefully at Nasr City’s Rabaa Al-Adawiya mosque on Tuesday evening, three miles away from Cairo’s presidential palace, to “support the legitimacy of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi,” and to voice their intentions to vote for the draft constitution in Saturday’s referendum, Al Ahram reported.

The pro-Morsi demonstrators had blocked a nearby road, chanting “Islam is returning” “Yes to the constitution” and “Morsi is the elected president.” Placards emblazoned with Morsi’s picture and slogans supporting the constitution were on display among the crowd.

Also on Tuesday evening, tens of thousands of anti-Morsi demonstrators were rallying at the presidential palace to protest Saturday’s constitutional referendum, three miles away from Rabaa Al-Adawiya mosque in Cairo’s Nasr City, where supporters of the president had gathered. Thousands filtered through openings that had been made by protesters in barriers erected by the military around the palace on Monday.

Chants of “Down with the Muslim Brotherhood” “Down with the rule of the Supreme Guide” and “Two cannot be trusted; the army and the Brotherhood,” echoed at the scene.

Despite an order issued by Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi for Egyptian military to arrest protesters, many different groups, some opposing Morsi’s decrees and the proposed constitution, others supporting a vote in favor of the proposed constitution, were marching.

Morsi had what may have been his sole moment in the sun when the west was congratulating him on his efforts to help broker the ceasefire between Israel and Hamas, the eight day conflict that took place in November.  The ceasefire agreement elevated Morsi to the position of peace-broker of the Middle East. But, perhaps emboldened by the global accolades, the very next day Morsi issued a series of decrees that placed his orders above the judiciary, and consolidated virtually all power within his own hands.

The massive protests sparked by those decisions have brought Egypt to a virtual standstill, and Morsi has issued conflicting decisions, some countermanding ones decreed only hours earlier, as was the case with the raising of taxes on certain items like soft drinks, cigarettes and beer and then their rescission over the weekend.

When the opposition continued to protest Morsi’s rule, his latest response was to issue another new edict, this one empowering the Egyptian military to arrest protestors.  It was announced Monday that this new decree would be issued in the government Gazette, titled “Law 107,” and would take effect today through this coming Saturday, December 15.  On that day, Egyptians are scheduled to vote in a referendum on the new proposed Constitution, drafted largely by Muslim Brotherhood members and other Islamist extremists.

The opposition movement, is denouncing the intended vote.  They believe the draft constitution does not reflect the will of the Egyptian people.  If the vote goes forward, the referendum will “lead to more division and sedition,” the National Salvation Front’s spokesperson, Sameh Ashour, said in a statement issued on Saturday.

The president and his backers want to go forward with the vote on Saturday, they seem to be confident that the results will reveal widespread support for the proposed constitution.  Morsi has promised that if the constitution is rejected in Saturday’s vote, a new one will be drawn up according to the wishes of the people, rather than the Islamist-dominated parliament, which crafted the current version.  The opposition does not seem to take comfort in his assurance.

The Front and other opposition groups continue calling for demonstrations to reject Morsi’s decisions.

For weeks opponents have been accusing President Morsi of acting like a dictator and of being controlled by malevolent forces.  The Islamists have begun to fight back.  On Monday, leading Salafist preacher Saeed Abdel-Azim warned that if protests continue, there will be what he called an “Islamic revolution.”  He also claimed that the opposition is funded by “foreign agents” acting on orders of the U.S. which seeks to strengthen Israel by creating chaos in Egypt.

 

Lori Lowenthal Marcus

The Spring of Islamic Fundamentalism

Thursday, August 2nd, 2012

The ability of the American media to ignore a “politically incorrect” event, regardless of its importance, is familiar. One of the best examples is the invitation issued by President Obama to the President of Egypt, Mohamed Morsi, to pay an official visit to the United States during the September session of the General Assembly of the United Nations.

The most frequently asked question in the immediate aftermath of the presidential elections in Egypt is: To what extent should an Islamic leader be trusted when he proclaims his intention to act in keeping with all the requirements of a democratic political system? Also, how much should an Islamic leader be trusted when he promises to respect the principles of religious and political freedom?

What, for instance, is the value of the following statement: “Islamic clerics will help lead the Revolution but then they step aside to let others rule”? Or: “Criticism of the Islamic Government will be tolerated.”?

Oops..! Sorry for the mistake! Those were not the words of the newly elected President of Egypt, Mohamed Morsi. These encouraging thoughts were expressed by Ayatollah Khomeini on September 25, 1978, just four months before his triumphant return to Teheran. What Khomeini then did is well known; there is no need to repeat it here. On August 18, 1979, however — less than a year after his pro-democracy statements — the thoughts of the powerful dictator of Iran had acquired a different direction. When he addressed the participants in the demonstrations of some disappointed former young supporters, the angry cleric issued the following warning: “I repeat for the last time: “Abstain from holding meetings, from blaspheming, from public protests. Otherwise I will break your teeth.”

On February 2, 2011, The American Thinker published an article by this author, exploring the similarities and differences between developments in Egypt and Iran. While the mainstream media was elated by what seemed a sunrise of democracy over the Nile, the article stated: “[T]he demonstrations shaking Tehran at the time and Cairo now have a clearly visible violent and Islamic component.” It also emphasized the prominent role the actions of President Obama’s administration were about to play in shaping the future political system of the most important Arab country.

As President-Elect, Mohammed Morsi promised to establish a “civil and democratic state in Egypt.” He also said he would appoint as Vice Presidents both a woman and a Christian, and assured Egyptian journalists that there would be no Islamization of the cultural life of the country. Morsi added, however, that those journalists who had published articles supporting the peace treaty with Israel would not be allowed to practice their profession.

If one again compares the Egyptian developments with the Iranian precedents, Mohamed Morsi currently is using Khomeini’s vocabulary from September of 1978. The question is: What kind of statement will he make if he reaches the degree of power Khomeini was enjoying in August of 1979?

Secretary of State Clinton proudly declared in Cairo that the United States did not have any preferences regarding the participants in the Egyptian elections. Although her announcement followed a well-established pattern of political correctness, at the same time it reflected the completely wrong strategy of the Obama administration. That policy is based on the absurd premise that by exposing Islamic Fundamentalism as the main enemy of democracy and Western civilization, American policymakers are endangering the United States more than are the actions of the Jihadists. It was this “strategy” that contributed immensely to the electoral victory of the Muslim Brotherhood. Twenty-Five million out of eighty million Egyptians preferred not to vote at all; the rest of the votes were almost split between Mohamed Morsi and his main rival – General Ahmed Shafik, a close associate of former President Hosni Mubarak.

American diplomacy had a better path to follow. A definite assurance should have been given to the effect that the United States would respect the choice of the Egyptian people. At the same time, if the new Government tried to change Egypt’s political system by imposing an ideology, that discriminated against women and minorities, and that violated its peace treaty with Israel, it should not expect any support from the United States.

One of the many questions Secretary Clinton could have asked President-Elect Morsi was: “If the Brotherhood has so tightly embraced the ideals of political democracy, how is it possible that such a crucial change did not in any way affect the ideology of the organization?”

Georgy Gounev

Deputy US Secretary of State holds talks with head of Muslim Brotherhood

Thursday, January 12th, 2012
Deputy US Secretary of State William Burns met Wednesday with Mohamed Morsi, the head of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party.
The meeting represented the highest level contacts between the US and the Islamist group since Washington ended a decades-long ban on formal meetings with the Muslim Brotherhood last year.

“It was an opportunity to hear from them and to reinforce our expectation that all the major parties will support human rights, tolerance, rights of women and will also uphold Egypt’s existing international obligations,” a State Department spokeswoman said.

 

Jewish Press Staff

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/deputy-us-secretary-of-state-holds-talks-with-head-of-muslim-brotherhood/2012/01/12/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: