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April 16, 2014 / 16 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Moral Authority’

‘Moral Authority,’ Jewish Style

Monday, February 11th, 2013

There’s an interesting article in the Jewish Press by Joe Settler which hinges on the concept of “Moral Authority.”

When a drafter of Israel’s Constitution says there is a problem because too many IDF commanders are religious, we need to worry about what kind of Constitution he is drafting.

“I meant, that as long as there is no solution for the source of the authority in the IDF in general, and specifically, including the integration of women [because listening to women sing, is the biggest problem the army faces], the problems will grow and increase. As the number of religious soldiers and commanders grow, since the authority of their Rabbis is what rules for them, the size of the problem will get larger. More and more officers and soldiers will find themselves indecisive when they face this conflict.” Dr. Arye (Arik) Carmon, head of the Israel Democracy Institute For many years, I’ve been troubled by the fact that even Torah observant (aka Orthodox) Rabbis, especially American Yeshiva University educated ones, such as Rabbi Shlomo Riskin and Rabbi Aaron Lichtenstein, have somehow added non-Jewish concepts/ideologies of Liberalism and Democracy to the 613 mitzvot, Torah commandments.

We Jews have a much more veteran and well documented social and political philosophy/ideology in our Torah and Talmud.  It actually contradicts many modern “moral” philosophies/ideologies, because it’s timeless.

I was especially disturbed in the troubling times leading to the Disengagement expulsions when so-called Torah observant rabbis said that a Knesset vote could over-ride the Jewish connection to the Land of Israel and even banish Jews from their homes, communities and businesses.

ישוב הארץ Yishuv Ha’Aretz, the Settling of the Land is a cornerstone of Judaism, and a large portion of the Torah is centered on it.

The Torah is our MORAL AUTHORITY.  Without it, we Jews couldn’t have had survived as a People during the thousands of years of exile from our Holy Land.  Our Land and our Torah are what has kept us a people.

Last night, I was at a shiur by  Inbal Amiton – “Believe and plant: The Redemption of Land as a Reflection of the Redemption of the Nation, According to Yirmiyahu 32”  in Matan.  Amiton said that according to Yirmiyahu (Jeremiah,) first G-d will return us to the Land and then we will do Teshuva, repent.

I see the process of Torah observant Jews growing in the IDF (Israeli Army) as proof that it is happening today.

Israel’s secular and quasi-secular/religious  leaders don’t understand that our true Moral Authority is G-d given.

Visit Shiloh Musings.

Title: The Origin Of Speeches: Intelligent Design in Language

Wednesday, November 22nd, 2006

Title: The Origin Of Speeches: Intelligent Design in Language
Author: Isaac Mozeson
Publisher: Lightcatcher Books

 

 

         Is proof of our Creator on the tips of human tongues and within hyoid bones around the world? Have linguists failed to address critical evidence proving that God designed any and all linguistic ability? Has the most important aspect of the Tower of Babel account in the Bible been overlooked?

 

         The author of The Origin Of Speeches: Intelligent Design in Language believes that the answers and the evidence supporting them are in every syllable we speak.

 

         Isaac Mozeson’s raison d’etre is to prove that human language did not evolve by accident.

 

        Metaphorical physics and chemistry, sound and sense, plus word root diagramming are his tools for demonstrating that humanity once spoke the same universal language and abruptly lost that skill in Babel. His 264-page paperback sets out to prove God’s programming of the human mind and body to facilitate speech and literature. From phonemes to phonetics, the complex book requires close attention to the text.

 

         With analyses of physiology and of vocabulary in several languages, Mozeson strives to end the belief that language results from community consensus about using arbitrary sounds. He asks, “Does Genesis specifically say that Adam and Eve were created with a Divine language, or that Hebrew was the language of Eden and the angels? No, but there are verbatim quotes of the Creator, the angels (even in later books like Ezekiel), and Adam and Eve that are always and only in Hebrew. Kabbalah classifies the human being as ‘the speaker,’ and it is instructive to examine the passage on the creation of Adam. Adam’s nostrils served as a neurological plug-in port, and a language program was ‘breathed’ or downloaded into him. In Genesis (2:7), the first (modern) human has the Divine spirit blown into his nostrils – (perhaps blowing out the suddenly large brain case of this strangely divine animal). In Eden and in touch with the Lord, Man becomes Homo sapiens, a thinker. Thinking requires language. Whichever way you interpret it, Adam receives the ability to think abstractly, truly something no animal can do, something that classifies humans as being ‘in the image of God.’”

 

         Readers need to consider morals, goals and strategies in order to comprehend and evaluate Mozeson’s point.

 

         The language shared between God and Eden’s occupants was the Divinely created Edenic. Mozeson reminds us that Adam and Eve’s descendants spoke Edenic only until the ziggurat/Tower of Babel was constructed in order to enable the destruction of God. The goal was to let humanity rule the world as perversely as it wished, unimpeded by Moral Authority.

 

         Genesis records that God ended the rebellion by confounding human communication. Commentators indicate that He achieved this with different languages. Mozeson’s prose and charts demonstrate that 70 spin-off languages rooted in Edenic thus filled immoral heads. He shows how Babel’s spontaneously diverse foreign tongues spun off into dialects, becoming additional languages to the original 70. Meanwhile, the Edenic origin of each language became obscured by time, migration to other locales and the distractions of ensuing human experiences.

 

         Mozeson explains that it’s challenging, but not impossible, for the modern ear to detect what happened, and stresses that his materials are the first of what he hopes will become many explorations into this topic.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/title-the-origin-of-speeches-intelligent-design-in-language/2006/11/22/

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