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November 26, 2014 / 4 Kislev, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘Mubarak’

Muslim Brotherhood Outlawed in Egypt – Again

Monday, September 23rd, 2013

An Egyptian court has outlawed the Muslim Brotherhood leaving the short-lived leading political party of the country back where it was under the Mubarak regime, when it was outlawed even though it maintained tiny faction in the parliament.

The judicial order to confiscate the Muslim Brotherhood’s assets follows a dramatic and violent crackdown on its activities following the military coup that ousted Mohammed Morsi from power. The sweeping ruling bars “any institution branching out of it or … receiving financial support” from the Muslim Brotherhood, leaving the organization exposed to a closure of its social services that have been a key to its popular support.

A New ‘Arab Spring’ in Egypt Aimed at Wiping out Radical Islam

Sunday, September 15th, 2013

Egypt is implementing an unprecedented campaign to rid Muslim mosques of radical Muslim Brotherhood Islamists by prohibiting 55,000 unlicensed clerics from preaching in mosques, the pan-Arab Asharq Al-Awsa reported.

Religious Endowments Minister Dr. Mohamed Mokhtar Gomaa said, “The ministry is in the process of forming a committee to monitor what is happening in the larger mosques and ensure that da’wa [proselytizing] there does not transgress the boundaries into political or partisan work, with any official found guilty of this being immediately held to account.”

“Mosques are for da’wa, not politics,” he added.

He maintained that the move is not aimed against Al-Azhar, the highest Sunni religious institution in Egypt. “This decision is to stop non-Azhar graduates from preaching in government and civil mosques,” he explained. “The Ministry of Awqaf does not ban anybody based on their political identity . . . but we want mosques, da’wa, and worship to be based on the moderate ideology of Al-Azhar.”

In other words, the new Egyptian military regime is making a bold bid to expel incitement from mosques. Egypt, unlike Israel, has the privilege of protecting the country from those trying to overthrow the government because it does not have to be a slave to “freedom of speech” principles that has become more and more accepted in some Western countries as protecting the right to yell “fire” in a crowded theatre. U.S. Supreme Court Felix Frankfurter used that phrase in an opinion that drew the line between freedom of speech and a danger to the public.

Cairo also was forced to relent a bit, postponing its new policy until October 1 in thousands of small, one-room neighborhood mosques.

Since the military coup that ousted the Muslim Brotherhood government of Mohammed Morsi, the new regime has arrested more than 2,000 Islamist activists and has arrested most of the Muslim Brotherhood‘s senior leaders. Morsi has been jailed on charges of incitement and involvement with violence, and other leaders have been charged with murder and terrorism.

The similarities between events in the rebellion against Hosni Mubarak and the democratically elected Muslim Brotherhood regime are chilling.

In both cases, police and security forces killed approximately 1,000 opponents.

In both cases, the Obama administration turned its back on Mubarak and Morsi, whom it had embraced after backing the ouster of Mubarak, a former ally.

The new regime essentially has done exactly what Mubarak did – outlawing the Muslim Brotherhood. Mubarak did so officially, although the party maintained a tiny faction of two dozen legislators in a 500-plus member parliament. The new regime has simply pulled the carpet under the feet of the leaders, and military authorizes are considering banning the Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist group, the Jordan Times reported.

The Muslim Brotherhood is not giving up so easily. A suicide bomber last Thursday attacked a convoy of the Interior Ministry, killing himself, a bystander and wounding 20 others. However, Egyptians have grown tired of the instability and are suffering from a dismal economy, two factors that have lent more popular support to getting rid of radical Islamists.

The new Egyptian policy could be the beginning of a new Arab Spring movement for real democracy, but Amnesty International already is insisting that Egypt play by Western rules. It has called for an investigation into security forces’ violence and violations of free speech.

That is absolutely true, of course. So far, no Western country, with the questionable exception of the United States, has found a “democratic” way to deal with anti-democratic fundamentalists, as Europeans are discovering, possibly all too late to stem the riding radical Islamic influence in most of its countries.

A small but significant example of Europe’s inability to stop the rising tide of radical Islam is the furious debate over a Parliament member’s private bill to prohibit wearing “a garment or other object” intended primarily to obscure their face in public.

Britain hosts nearly 3 million Muslims, a sizeable and growing minority.

Muslim leaders are outraged at Birmingham Metropolitan College’s announcement last week that it will ban Islamic face-veil, or niqab, inside its campus,

“It upsets me that we are being discriminated against,” a 17-year-old Muslim student at who did not want to be named, told The London Telegraph. “It’s disgusting. It is a personal choice and I find it absolutely shocking that this has been brought in at a college in Birmingham city center when the city is so multicultural and so many of the students are Muslim.

Israeli lawmaker Ben-Eliezer: Egyptian Street Longing for Mubarak

Friday, August 23rd, 2013

The people of Egypt have been longing for Hosni Mubarak, Labor party Knesset Member and former Cabinet minister and IDF officer Binyamin Ben-Eliezer said Thursday, when the ex-Egyptian president was released from prison.

Mubarak was freed to a waiting helicopter, which took him to a military hospital. He will remain under house arrest after spending more than two years in prison.

“I think the discharge was to be expected,” Ben-Eliezer told the Yediot Acharonot newspaper. “We’ve been hearing a longing for Mubarak from the people of Egypt for a long time. These are the sounds of the Egyptian street.

“Mubarak is not an innocent man, but he contributed greatly to stability in the Middle East and in the West in general. He loves his people.”

Mubarak Free from Jail but Faces House Arrest

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013

Egyptian authorities released former president Hosni Mubarak from prison late Thursday afternoon but faces house arrest due to pending charges of corruption and involvement in the murders of hundreds of people whose protests helped oust him from office two years.

An Egyptian court freed him because he has been in jail for the maximum amount of time allowed prior to conclusion of a trial. He has been acquitted on one charge of corruption, and his trial for involvement in the murders has been recessed.

Another charge of corruption still awaits him.

Egyptian Court Orders Release of Mubarak

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

An Egyptian court on Wednesday ordered the release of Hosni Mubarak, imprisoned for several months while awaiting trial on a charge of corruption.

The former dictator has been in jail the maximum amount of time allowed, it said, but his release could be delayed at least until Thursday if the prosecution appeals.

Mubarak has been cleared on one charge of corruption, but a trial on a second charge has not yet been concluded. He formerly was sentenced to life in jail for involvement in the murder or more than 800 protesters in the demonstrations in 2011, but a court accepted his appeal and ordered a re-trial.

Welcome Back Hosni (Part 2)

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

Back in June I predicted we would see a military coup in Egypt, Muslim Brotherhood members killed, Morsi who knows where, and Mubarak back in the reins.

The first 3 have happened, and now I just read in JewishPress.com that Mubarak may be out of jail in less than a week.

Meanwhile the NYTimes is blaming Israel for wanting the Egyptian military back in charge, instead of Islamic radicals.

I find that amusing, because America should want it too - if they wanted a stable, functioning Egypt and to keep the peace treaty viable (which they are guarantors for).

But unfortunately, Obama seems to think the Muslim Brotherhood is the way to go, so he keeps betting on their apocalyptic horse, and if he can’t get Islam in control over Egypt, well, then he’ll try to bring them into power in Judea and Samaria by creating an opening for Hamas to take over there.

Anyway, the point of this post is simply to toot my own horn, and thank the blogger, Daled Amos, for reminding me of my Mubarak prediction.

Radical, Democratic Changes to Egypt’s Constitution, MBs Out

Monday, August 19th, 2013

The technical committee has been assigned the task of “amending” Egypt’s 2012 Muslim-Brothers inspired constitution is almost finished, Al Ahram reported. The committee is headed by Interim President Adly Mansour’s legal advisor, Ali Awad.

In a press conference Sunday, Awad told the press that the committee will finish its work Monday, and the new draft constitution will be announced Wednesday. Al Ahram quotes the basic instruction given the authors of the new document: “Fundamental changes must be introduced to 2012 Islamist-backed constitution.”

By fundamental, they mean no Muslim Brothers in politics, ever again.

“The 2012 constitution was drafted under the former regime of the Muslim Brotherhood to grant Islamists an upper hand and a final say in Egypt’s political future, and this must be changed now,” Ahram quotes a committee source. “When the people revolted 30 June, their main goals were not confined to removing Mohamed Morsi from power, but also changing the fundamental pillars of the religious tyranny the Muslim Brotherhood regime tried its best to impose on Egypt.”

The source revealed that the new constitution must impose a ban on political parties based on religious foundations.

The source explained that “the anticipated ban gained momentum after the committee received requests and proposals from more than 400 political, economic and social institutions, pressing hard for the necessity of safeguarding Egypt against Islamist factions trying to change the civil nature of the country into a religious oligarchy.”

Except that – surprise, surprise, despite the anti-Brotherhood sentiment common to the new masters of Egypt, the source says the new constitution “will keep Article 2 of 2012′s Islamist-backed constitution — which states that Islamic Sharia is the main source of legislation — in place.”

This, according to committee chairman Ali Awad, is done “in order to stress the Islamic identity of Egypt.”

According to the source, most political institutions have recommended that “if it is necessary to keep the Islamic Sharia article in place as a nod to Islamists like El-Nour, it is by no means necessary to maintain the 2012 constitution’s separate article (Article 219) that delivers an interpretation of Islamic Sharia.”

Article 219 of the 2012 constitution states: “The principles of Islamic Sharia include its generally-accepted interpretations, its fundamental and jurisprudential rules, and its widely considered sources as stated by the schools of Sunna and Gamaa.”

Not any more. They’re also going to scrap the Shura Council, the upper house of parliament, that was created in 1980 by late President Anwar El-Sadat to befriend his Islamist foes. They shot him anyway. The MB exploited its majority in the council in 2012 to “Brotherhoodise national press institutions and the state-owned Radio and Television Union (known as Maspero) and gain legislative powers to Islamise society.”

Sources are saying there will be radical changes of articles aimed at regulating the performance of the High Constitutional Court and media institutions. “We aim to reinforce the independence of these institutions and not to face any more intimidation by ruling regimes,” the source said. He also indicated that, “The electoral system is also expected to see a complete overhaul in order not to cause any discrimination against independents or come in favor of party-based candidates.”

And another noteworthy change: Article 232 of the 2012 constitution, imposing a ban on leading officials of Mubarak’s defunct ruling National Democratic Party (NDP), will be annulled.

So, it appears the Egyptians are quite capable of taking care of their legal affairs without nasty interventions from their patron wannabes in Washington. Perhaps it would be best for the U.S. to shut up for a couple of weeks and not meddle?

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/radical-democratic-changes-to-egypts-constitution-mbs-out/2013/08/19/

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