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June 28, 2016 / 22 Sivan, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘NATO’

Israel to Open Permanent Office at NATO Headquarters in Brussels

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has announced Israel will accept an invitation from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) to open a permanent office at its Brussels headquarters in Belgium.

The invitation allegedly came after Turkey lifted a veto that blocked the upgrade five years ago. If true, it is another move that signals a warming of the ‘big chill’ between Ankara and Jerusalem since 2010.

“This is something we worked on for many years,” Netanyahu said at the start of the weekly cabinet meeting.

“I think this is important to Israel’s standing in the world. The countries of the world want to cooperate with us because of our determined struggle against terrorism, because of our technological knowledge, our intelligence deployment and other reasons.”

Israel is currently a participant in the NATO Mediterranean Dialogue, together with Egypt, Algeria, Tunisia, Jordan, Mauritania and Morocco.

Hana Levi Julian

Libyan President Gaddafi Asked Israel for Help Against West

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

According to a report by Israel’s Galei Tzahal raqdio, the late Libyan president/dictator Muammar Gaddafi turned to Israel via secret channel, asking for Israel’s help in getting the Western forces to stop attacking and trying to overthrow his regime.

Obviously it didn’t work.

Gaddafi was killed in 2011.

Libya has been in a civil war with itself and in battles with ISIS for the past 5 years. Over half a million Libyans have been left homeless as a result of the fighting.

Jewish Press News Briefs

U.S. Condemns Istanbul Attack, Cites 2 American Victims

Sunday, March 20th, 2016

The White House issued a statement Saturday night condemning the Istanbul terror attack that killed two dual American-Israeli citizens earlier in the day.

“The United States condemns in the strongest possible terms today’s terrorist attack in Istanbul, Turkey. Two American citizens were among those killed in this heinous attack,” National Security Council spokesperson Ned Price said in a statement.

“Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families and loved ones of those killed, and we wish a speedy recovery to those injured.”

A third Israeli and an Iranian citizen were both killed in the attack, along with the suicide bomber, Savaz Yildiz, 33, a resident of the Turkish city of Adana who was reportedly known to the authorities.

Istanbul Governor Vasip Sahin said the explosion occurred outside a local government office on Istiklal Street, where numerous foreign consulates are located. The area is also dotted with many cafes and restaurants.

The U.S. State Department also condemned the attack in a statement released by spokesperson John Kirby.

“The United States strongly condemns the terrorist attack today on Istanbul’s Istiklal Avenue. We extend our deepest condolences to the families of those killed and our hopes for a quick recovery for those wounded,” the statement read.

“We will remain in close touch with Turkish authorities during the investigation. The United States stands in solidarity with our NATO Ally Turkey in combating the common threat of terrorism. This vicious attack is the latest in a series of indefensible violence targeting innocent people throughout Turkey – Turkish citizens and international visitors alike. These acts of terrorism only reinforce our determination to support all those across the region working to promote peace and reconciliation,” the statement said.

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg condemned the attack in a written statement saying there can be no justification for terrorism. He said, “NATO allies stand united with Turkey, determined to fight against terrorism.”

French Foreign Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault also condemned the attack. “I strongly condemn this despicable and cowardly act that has caused the death of several people,” Ayrault said in a statement, adding Paris stands in solidarity with Turkey.

This past Wednesday Germany had closed its consulate and school in Istanbul due to credible security threats.

Hana Levi Julian

Turkey Blames PKK, Syrian YPG for Ankara Terror Attack, Vows Retaliation

Thursday, February 18th, 2016

Turkey is vowing to retaliate against the terror group who attacked its capital city Wednesday night.

No one has yet claimed responsibility for the massacre. A powerful car bomb exploded in central Ankara, killing 28 people and injuring 61 others as it ripped through military buses carrying young personnel to facilities near the parliament.

Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu placed the blame for the attack squarely on the YPG Syrian Kurdish organization. Speaking to reporters in Ankara, Davutoglu identified the terrorist as Saleh Najar, a Syrian national born in the Hasakah province.

“It has been determined with certainty that this attack was carried out by members of the separatist terror organization PKK, together with a member of the YPG who infiltrated from Syria,” Davutoglu said.

Turkish security forces detained nine people in connection with the attack. Davutoglu added, “Their connection to the YPG has been confirmed” but said he could not comment further due to the ongoing investigation.

The Turkish Air Force conducted cross-border air strikes in northern Iraq, he said, killing more than 70 PKK terrorists, including senior members. “We will take all precautions under the scope of legitimate self-defense and will retaliate with no hesitation.”

Turkey’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mevlut Cavusoglu, has been instructed to forward documents about the attack to members of the United Nations Security Council, he said.

“It is our right to expect a common stance against a terrorist organization,” Davutoglu declared.

The comment was directed at members of the UN and NATO who do not see eye-to-eye with Turkey — another UN and NATO member — on the status of the YPG and PYD.

Turkey regards the YPG and PYD as terror groups linked to the PKK, but that is not the case in the rest of the world.

The Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) is indeed recognized as a terrorist organization by the United States and the European Union. However, the Syrian Kurdish YPG and PYD groups are not seen in the same light by the U.S., nor by the European Union. Turkey regards both as terrorist organizations as well.

Davutoglu warned that those ‘directly and indirectly supporting’ the YPG ‘risk losing Turkey’s backing, according to the Daily Sabah newspaper. He added that it “unacceptable for members of NATO and the United States to have relations with an organization which carried out terrorist attacks ‘in the heart of Turkey.’”

Hana Levi Julian

NATO Course Teaches Israel Air Force Air Traffic Controllers

Monday, October 19th, 2015

The IAF “Gulfstream” Squadron hosted the NATO Course for air traffic controllers last week in Nevatim Airbase to learn to operate in the English language according to NATO’s military tactics.

“We began adopting some of the American controlling regulations in 2001”, said Lt. Col. (Res.) Erez Reyvit, the course commander. “NATO’s military tactics are unique, organized, reflects a more clear image of the enemy and cannot be deviated from and therefore the learning process is difficult and requires a lot of practice”.

Corporal Meytal Linzer, a simulator instructor from the “Gulfstream” Squadron and the leader of the course, explained:

The instructor set the aerial image the controller sees on his screen and we change it and take it and increase the level of difficulty to make it harder to decipher. After each sortie we debrief them in order to create progress and independent learning process

IAF Lt. Col. Sigal Benglas said, “The biggest difficulty if obviously the language. You have to adopt a completely different way of thinking and get used to the orders given in English, which are also sometimes different from their Hebrew translation.”

IDF Spokesperson's Office

Russian Jets Intimidating US Aircraft Over Syria

Thursday, October 8th, 2015

Two U.S. officials briefed on intelligence from Syria revealed that Russian jets have shadowed U.S. predator drones above Syria on at least three separate occasions since Russia began its air campaign, and forced U.S. aircraft to change their flight path.

Russian shadowing of U.S. drones happened repeatedly, making it clear to observers that it was not just a mistake, but was an intentional act by the Russians.

In addition to the tailing of U.S. drones, Russian jets forced two U.S. aircraft to change their flight paths in order to avoid a collision, U.S. Navy Captain Jeff Davis told reporters.

The two planes were F-16s that had departed from Turkey’s Incirlik air base. The planes were flying towards the ISIS stronghold of Raqqa, a senior defense official told CNN. The U.S. aircraft that diverted were not able to complete their mission, the official said.

In addition to Russian aircraft, there are now Russian ground forces and rocket launchers posed in strike mode in Syria.

The bulk of the Russian fighting forces and material are forming a belt around the Syrian city of Latakia, Bashar al Asaad’s stronghold, giving credence to the claim that Putin’s military forces in the Middle East are there to protect the long-embattled Syrian president, as much as they are there to provide additional forces to the anti-ISIS coalition.

U.S. forces are not the only ones complaining of Russian bullying.

Last weekend Turkey charged Russia with violating its airspace on two separate occasions. Turkish officials called Russia’s daring “unprofessional” and a “provocation.” NATO officials warned Russia to stay away from Turkey, which is a member of the western alliance.

“It’s unacceptable, it’s dangerous, and it’s reckless behavior and it adds to the tensions,” NATO’s Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg told CNN about the incursions into Turkish airspace.

“We see the violation of the Turkish airspace becomes more important, more dangerous, because it happens in a context where we see more fighting, more Russian military presence in Syria.”

Whether NATO will come to its member’s aid if Russia becomes entangled in a military dispute with Turkey is yet another question in the long list of unknowns surrounding the escalating turmoil in the Middle East.

Lori Lowenthal Marcus

US, Germany Pull Patriot Batteries from Turkey

Sunday, August 16th, 2015

The United States and Germany have both announced they plan to pull their Patriot missile batteries from Turkey following a reassessment of the threat from Syria.

Both nations deployed the anti-missile defensive batteries on the southern Turkish border in 2013 in response to a request submitted to NATO by Ankara over “spillage” from the Syrian civil war.

Additional Patriot missile batteries were provided by the Netherlands as well, but were withdrawn earlier this year, and replaced instead by units from Spain.

The Patriot units from the United States will be returned stateside, ostensibly for “upgrades,” according to a joint Turkish-U.S. statement issued on Sunday.

“The United States and NATO are committed to supporting Turkey’s security and regional stability,” the statement said. “If needed, the United States is prepared to return Patriot assets and personnel to Turkey within one week.”

Germany, meanwhile, has said it will shut down its Patriot program altogether.

German Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen announced last week that Berlin will allow its three-year Patriot mission simply to lapse in January rather than seek parliamentary approval for renewal, Reuters reported.

“The threat in this war-torn region has shifted in focus,” von der Leyen said in a statement on the German defense ministry’s website. “It now stems from the terror organization Islamic State. Therefore, we will remain engaged in the region in a continued effort to stabilize it.”

Hana Levi Julian

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/us-germany-pull-patriot-batteries-from-turkey/2015/08/16/

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