web analytics
April 16, 2014 / 16 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Netanya’

Vladimir Putin Coming to Netanya Monday

Thursday, June 21st, 2012

President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin, Israeli President Shimon Peres and Jewish leaders from around the world will unveil the brand-new ‘Victory Monument’ in Netanya, Israel this Monday, June 25.

The Monument design was the first-ever joint initiative between Israel and Russia to commemorate the Red Army. The newly elected President Putin will be visiting Israel specifically for the inauguration ceremony.

The Monument was funded by major Jewish philanthropists, led by Keren Hayesod – UIA, and the World Forum of Russian Jewry.

A world-class design commemorating the Red Army’s victory over Nazi Germany in WWII, the Monument honors the millions of Red Army soldiers who perished in the war, among them 120,000 Jews.

Alexander Levin, President of the World Forum of Russian Jewry and an American citizen, will be representing Russian-speaking Jews from North America.

“This incredible monument symbolizes the historical and ever-important role the Red Army played during WWII and its part in defeating the Nazis and their horrors. Millions of Russian Jews around the world are united at this moment in solidarity for the brave Red Army soldiers,” said Levin.

More than half a million Jewish soldiers fought with the Red Army in WWII against the Nazis – 120,000 were killed.

About two years ago, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu proposed the idea of the monument to President Putin on his visit to Moscow. Putin promised to come to Israel for the inauguration ceremony.

Video: Five to Eight UFOs in Israel’s Sky Wednesday Night

Thursday, May 10th, 2012

Moti Gaber, a resident of Kfar Yonah, a suburb of Netanya, Israel, was coming home with his son Wednesday night around 8:00 from the Lag Ba’Omer festivities, when he saw something quite literally out of this world.

“I saw something very strange,” he told the Jewish Press early Thursday morning. “I arrived at the parking bay in my housing complex, I look up and, alongside the top of the buildings, I see these orange balls. They were moving in formation, eight altogether.”

Gaber, who served in the IDF in a combat unit, said he can tell the difference between a fireworks pencil, or flares, and what he saw last night. “It looked nothing like any of those things,” he insisted. “If they were fireworks pencils they would have dropped and evaporated. And they just didn’t look like flares. As to balloons, what can I tell you, it makes no sense for a balloon to move horizontally like that.”

Gaber also didn’t think what he had seen were any kind of aircraft known to him, and he contends the objects were perfectly silent and flew too close together to be planes or drones.

“They disappeared from view, I looked for them behind the buildings and saw nothing,” he said.

The police center for special reports told the Jewish Press there were no unusual reports last night in the Netanya area.

Video: Netanya Purim Carnival—Sassy, Noisy, Happy

Friday, March 9th, 2012

We went out to watch the Purim Parade in our sweet town of Netanya, and for a few hours were transported to a care-free world, somewhere between Disneyland and New Orleans. Our daughter Yarden said, Purim is like Halloween but without dead people. Everyone was distinctly alive in Netanya this Purim. And everyone seemed to take very seriously the idea of the Purim happy noise. Even the babies.

Traveling In Israel With A 12-Year-Old

Friday, October 16th, 2009

   Seeing Israel is one thing. Seeing Israel through the eyes of a 12-year-old is another, especially when the child is your grandson or granddaughter.

 

   What is described as the “ultimate journey,” begins when Randy, my wife and I, board El Al flight no 28, to the Jewish state. Security is tight. How tight? They ask our grandson the name of his rabbi at his day school. He knows it!

 

   “Israel is fun,” Randy wrote on a postcard halfway through our trip. What youngster would not enjoy riding a horse at “The Ranch,” in Havatzelet Hasharon, north of Netanya

(www.the-ranch.co.il). Saddling up, he moves out onto rolling sand dunes along the beckoning, blue Mediterranean.

 

   Or racing around in go-carts at GO Karting Poleg (www.gokarting.co.il), around and around the indoor track popular with kids and adults alike.

 

   Our base is an apartment in coastal, cosmopolitan Netanya between Haifa and Tel Aviv. To overcome jet lag, we rest for a day and later surf, swim and bask in the sun.

 

   Randy and our niece, Jeanette, 12, who, with her parents, will travel with us, immediately take to Netanya, with its large French and Russian population; its croissants, and borsht, its Saturday-night, carnival-time atmosphere in the city’s festive Kikar Atzmaut. Pizza parlors, cafes, and stall after stall of costume jewelry and crafts. “A lot to see,” says Randy as he picks out a new magen david which he wears the entire trip.

 

 


Randy with two soldiers of Zahal at the Kotel

 

   “Today I went to Jerusalem and saw the holiest place in Jewish history,” Randy wrote in his journal about the trip to the Kotel, the Western Wall. “So much history holiness … praying … touching the Wall,” Randy tells me with an awesome look on his face as we walk around the square. He takes pictures with Israeli soldiers; they all look so proud.

 

   Next, a must on any tour: Chain of Generations program and its striking glass sculptures, artistic illuminations and video presentations (www.thekotel.org). Then the informative tour through the Western Wall tunnel which parallels the entire length of the Temple Mount. He is moved, he says, “because there is so much history behind that Wall.”

 

   Over the next 10 days – with necessary breaks – you just can’t tour every day with kids – we make it to Yad Vashem, the Tank Museum, Mini-Israel, Masada, The Dead Sea, Haifa’s Carmel Center, Tel Aviv port and Independence Hall, Weizmann Institute, Tiberias, Safed and more.

 

   Randy plants a tree in the JNF forest at the religious Kibbutz Lavi, near Tiberias, in memory of his other grandmother, Sharon.

 

   At the Museum of the Diaspora, Ramat Aviv, (www.bh.org.il) excellent guides and visuals trace Jewish history. “I knew a lot of that,” says Randy.

 

   Driving along the Haifa-Tel Aviv Highway No. 2, a statue of Herzl on a water tower looms over us. Randy knows who Herzl was, “If you will it, it is no dream,” he volunteers.

 

   In Tiberias, we don’t have to tell him who Rambam and Rabbi Akiva were. At their tombs, images are reignited in prayer; new facts imparted by guides.

 

   Kids enjoy being with family, especially new cousins their own age. Israeli cousins want to practice their English which prompts Randy to exclaim after a sumptuous dinner, “Thanks. Good food!” After the trip, they will communicate via e-mail, Facebook, Skype; for Randy, another bridge to the Jewish state.

 

 


Randy on a tank at The Memorial Site and Armed Corps Museum, Latrun

Photos by Riva Frank


 

   A trip highlight is the Memorial Site and Armed Corps Museum, Latrun (www.yadlashiryon.com). This Taggart fort still shows scars of the tough battles fought over it. Randy eagerly climbs up onto every tank: Shermans, Centurions, and Israel’s own Merkava. I don’t have to ask their reaction to this site; you could see it on their faces and hear it in their language: “Cool.”

 

   Young people are aware of danger, too. “Are there Arabs over there?” Randy asks during our long drives, sometimes near the border. “Yes, there are,” we answer, but comfort him that Israel has good security and, certainly all Arabs are notterrorists. Not righteous to hate an entire people.

 

   The point is made – without words – when a friendly Arab taxi driver in Jerusalem drops us off to pick up our car at a parking lot and adds, “follow me” as he goes out of his way to guide us out of Jerusalem.

 

  We scoot around the country and stop at the The Ayalon Institute in Kibbutz Hill, Rehovot (www.shimur.org.il). A top-secret operation took place here between the end of World War II and Israel’s independence: The Haganah secretly manufactured bullets in an underground bunker.

 

   Randy has visited the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. After spending two hours at Yad Vashem (www.yadvashem.org) in the Hall of Names, he searches but can’t find his great, great- grandparents’ names. “I’ll work on it from home,” he says.

 

 


Randy with Rabbi Yisrael Meir Lau

 

   At Yad Vashem, we meet Rabbi Yisrael Meir Lau, the former Ashkenazi chief rabbi, who that day had honored the late Feodor Mikhailichenko as “Righteous Among the Nations.” The man saved the rabbis’ life and Mikhailichenko’s daughters are present to accept a medal. We take a photo of Rabbi Lau and Randy.

 

   In Netanya stands the Wingate Institute, the National Sports Institute of Israel, which offers free tours (www.wingate.org.il) and which is named after British-born Major General Orde Wingate – who trained the Haganah. Located on 120-acres of landscaped gardens, it prepares Israel’s Olympic athletes as well as the country’s sports instructors and teachers. Randy’s and Jeanette’s eyes light up as we watch the athletes practice, especially the skilled Israeli Olympic female, volleyball team.

 

   Regarding sports, on our last day, Randy asks:

 

   “Sabi, maybe you can get me a surf board?”

 

   “But Randy, it’s too big to lug on the plane.”

 

   “No problem. Get it now. We’ll store it. When I come back, I’ll have it.”

 

   I have no doubt he’ll be back.


 


 


   Ben G. Frank is author of “A Travel Guide to Jewish Europe,” 3rd edition; “A Travel Guide to Jewish Russia and Ukraine,” and “A Travel Guide to the Jewish Caribbean and South America,” Pelican Publishing Co., Gretna, LA.

True Role Models (Part Three)

Wednesday, December 22nd, 2004

This is the third part of a series on Aliyah and Klita (absorption) stories of American Jews who came to Israel for ideological and religious reasons in the past years.

It is hard for modern day visitors to Israel to imagine some of the situations that immigrants to Israel found 20 and 30 years ago. Information by phone, for example, was hard to receive because office clerks would often be unwilling to give out information via the telephone (even about which documents you needed to bring to the office). Service was usually not considered a function of businesses or government, and public transportation was often the only way to get around because cars were prohibitively expensive to buy, maintain and run.

Today, Israel is a technologically advanced state and workers have been taught the importance of giving reasonable service. Clerks are willing to use the phone, fax and even the Internet. Instead of taking a number and waiting on a long line, you can get the information you need by surfing on government or company Internet sites.

For many of us, there is no place else to live but in Israel. This past Chanukah, I drove into the city of Kiryat Sefer in the early evening and was surprised that it was so dark on the street. I asked my son Avi why, and he explained that the city does not turn on the streetlights during Chanukah until an hour after the time for lighting the Chanukah lights so that everyone can see the lights burning brightly in every window or doorway. Pirsuma D’Nisa!

* * *

Alan Aranoff grew up in LA and received a BA and Master of Architecture degree at UCLA (under the tutelage of some of the best known architects of the time). He worked for Kohn Pedersen Fox, a major architecture firm in NYC. Despite their offers to substantially increase his pay and their other arguments against leaving (mostly, they just couldn’t figure him out – they thought his notice to leave was a ploy for more money), he moved to Israel in 1987.

Alan became a senior designer at a well-known Israeli firm and went on to become an independent architect and has been privileged to work on notable projects in Israel. But in the world of architecture, his Israel practice cannot quite compare with the international level of work (and compensation) that he had in New York. He believes, however, that the spiritual content of his work in Israel far surpasses anything he could ever have done in America, and he doesn’t think it is possible to raise children the same way in America.

His wife, Devorah, left a good position in computer programming with a large corporation in Chicago and was able to do similar work in Israel, but not, of course, under the same terms. For both of them it was not a simple thing at all to leave their home, jobs, parents and family.

Alan believes that when American Jews make remarks disparaging those who came on Aliyah many years ago, it is mostly to assuage their own guilt for themselves not making Aliyah. If someone who stayed in America can convince himself that he didn’t make Aliyah when he was young because he was successful in the States, while those that did make Aliyah did so because they had nothing to lose, it makes the one who remained behind feel better. The reality, as we know, is much different.

Alan can list a number of doctors (that’s one group that really sacrificed), writers, business people, etc. who made Aliyah not long after graduating Ivy League and other good schools many years ago. There were very few who left the States as failures, and those who did also tended to fail in their Aliyah and eventually moved back.

To this day, Israeli friends and colleagues often ask Alan how he could have possibly left his position in the States (when some of them dream of just being able to live there and speak English like an American…).

* * *

Sandy and Irv Portnoy arrived in Israel in 1976 from Chicago with four young children aged six to 13. Irv is a pediatrician and was in private practice in Chicago. In 1972, Irv was offered a position at Laniado Hospital in Netanya as soon as it opened its doors to the public. In 1976, the hospital opened and the Portnoys came on Aliyah. Irv became the chief of the newborn nursery during the first six years of Laniado Hospital and took care of many of the babies born in Netanya during those years. He later worked for almost 20 years at Kupat Cholim Leumit.

In America, the Portnoys had the opportunity to make lots of money, while in Israel, Irv was always a salaried worker. He consciously made the decision that he wanted to take care of Jewish babies in Israel. Irv also joined the Mishmar Ha’ezrachi, the volunteer home guard, within one week of his Aliyah, and guarded Netanya with a partner until he was drafted four years later.

In the army, Irv worked his way up to becoming a captain. When he reached the point where the army no longer needed his services, Irv went back to volunteering with the Mishmar Ha’ezrachi and worked his way into various special units. Eventually, the Air Force decided that they needed his services and he returned to active reserve duty.

Now that he has retired from Kupat Cholim, he has been volunteering three days a week with various units of the police – tourist police, regular patrols, and Border Patrol (some days working 10 or more hours). For 17 years he volunteered at Magen David Adom on the Intensive Care Ambulance one night a week (double shift).

Sandy worked at Laniado Hospital, and later at a high-tech electronics company as a Hebrew-English secretary. They have four children and 14 grandchildren to date (Kein Yirbu), all living in Israel. Sandy strongly feels that no American came here because (s)he was forced to. We all came voluntarily because of ideological reasons.

* * *

Abba and Ruthie Engelberg came in 1972 because they are Zionists. Ruthie was in Bnei Akiva for many years and Abba was teaching at Brooklyn Polytech and was a vice president of the Religious Zionists of America (RZA). Today, Abba heads Machon Tal (women’s division of Machon Lev).

* * *

Sandy Freundlich came on Aliyah in 1962 with her husband and an infant. Her husband had just finished his MA in Columbia in Physics. They went to live on kibbutz Tirat Tzvi for purely ideological reasons. In the United States, Sandy had been a Hebrew teacher. Sandy and her husband left kibbutz, raised a family, and she is still involved in education but on a supervisory level. She works for the Open University. Her children are all in Israel. They have degrees from MA to PhD and have served in the Army or Sherut Leumi. Like most American olim, she left behind her family, and it took a long time before you could afford to visit them in those days.

* * *

Tamar Ross was born and bred in Detroit. Her language at home was Hebrew, even though it was not her parent’s mother tongue, but rather because they were Zionists. In 1954, after finishing high school at age 16, Tamar decided to come to Israel for a year of limudei kodesh. At the time, there were no institutions in Israel for foreign students, and certainly not for women. She joined a program for Aliyat Hanoar leaders. Conditions at the course were primitive, with an outhouse for a toilet, cut up pieces of newspaper as toilet paper, and rations of half a hard-boiled egg as the protein for the day. Private cars, phones and electric refrigerators were rare luxuries that hardly anyone owned. This was in stark contrast to the middle-class suburban home and standard of living in which she grew up.

After that year, Tamar wrote to her parents and told them that she would like to stay in Israel. Her parents came to visit her in Israel and they too decided to make Aliyah. They arrived immediately prior to the Sinai campaign in 1956. Their Israeli friends suggested that they go back to America, and people were hoarding groceries in preparation for war. They refused to leave and stayed despite the war.

Tamar’s father became the secretary of the chief rabbinate and her mother became a supervisor of teachers of English as a foreign language in the Ministry of Education. Tamar raised children and went on to teach Jewish thought at Midreshet Lindenbaum and then became a professor of Jewish philosophy at Bar Ilan University. She is still employed by both institutions. This year, she is at Yale University serving as a visiting scholar.

(To Be Continued)

(Comments may be sent to
dov@gilor.com)

There Is Linkage

Friday, May 2nd, 2003

As it turns out, there really is linkage between what is going on in Iraq and the Intifada. Not the kind of linkage Yasir Arafat, Tony Blair and the European Union are suggesting - that the
necessary next step after “regime change” in Iraq is setting an arbitrary timeline for the establishment of a Palestinian state.

Rather, the dispatch of Palestinian suicide bombers by Islamic Jihad, Hamas and Fatah to Iraq to confront American and British troops, the widespread demonstrations across the West Bank and in Gaza, and leadership declarations of support for Saddam Hussein’s regime document what we have been saying for months: Muslim terrorists share, money, personnel,
intelligence and training facilities and are part of one interconnected enterprise.

Consider what that crowd is saying. Islamic Jihad’s “Jerusalem Brigade” the other day claimed responsibility for the recent suicide bombing in Netanya, calling it “a gift” to the Iraqi people.

Islamic Jihad also distributed leaflets which “congratulated the suicide pioneers who have arrived in Baghdad to fight in the ranks of Arab fighters and to perform their holy duty. We
emphasize the connection between the unity of goals for Palestine and Baghdad to stand up to the American-Zionist war meant to harm the entire Arab nation and Islam.”

Ramadan Shelah, secretary general of Islamic Jihad, said the Netanya attack, is the response to the call for performing holy duties. The jihad is a commandment and now a new gate of jihad has been opened for the entire Islamic nation and, within that framework, the resistance forces in Palestine will work. If the sons of Islamic Jihad and its supporters succeed, they
will reach the battlefield in Baghdad to participate in this war.

Plainly, the Palestinians claim the inalienable right to kill Israelis in order to destroy the Jewish state and end the “occupation.” They now also claim the same right in order to drive the infidel United States and England from Iraqi soil, regardless of the reason for their being there.

We hope that President Bush keeps this firmly in mind when he hears from some of his advisers and allies that this Palestinian mindset will miraculously change in the short term
simply because they have gone through the motions of appointing a prime minister.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/editorial/there-is-linkage/2003/05/02/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: