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April 17, 2014 / 17 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Neturei Karta’

Anti-Zionist Rabbi Blames Israel for Attack by Muslim

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

An anti-Zionist rabbi said he was attacked in Amsterdam because of Israel, but police maintain that the incident simply was an argument over an “almost” traffic accident.”

The facts of the story are clear, but it takes a very open mind, if not a deranged one, to understand the interpretation.

A car almost hit a pedestrian, who was so angry at the near mishap that he snapped a picture of the driver who had supposedly stopped his car in order to threaten to do to him what he didn’t do by hitting him with his car.

The motorist then supposedly ran after the man and attacked him, who apparently was not happy with the idea that he already had escaped injury by not being run over by the car. The victim was a rabbi and dressed in traditional Haredi gear. For that reason or for another, the driver, a Muslim, reportedly hurled hate insults at him and then attacked him after a chase..

The police said the whole affair was not an anti-Semitic attack, while the rabbi drew the obvious conclusion that Israel is to blame for the attack.

Israel?

Of course, but you have to understand Neturei Karta to follow the reasoning.

The rabbi is named Joseph Antebi, and just to make the story stranger than fiction, he is an Israel living in Holland, where he is not contaminated by a Zionist state. He prefers anti-Zionists like himself.

And perhaps like the Muslim who attacked him.

The driver-attacker “had relatively dark skin and didn’t look very Dutch, or at least didn’t look like his family has been living in Holland for centuries,” Antebi told the JTA.

He claimed that the driver, according to the rabbi, stopped the car and threatened to hit him. Antebi pulled out his cell phone to photograph the Muslim, perhaps for nostalgia to remember he is not the only one who hates others because of their race, religion or citizenship.

The good rabbi calls himself a “Palestinian Jew,” JTA reported.

But he really loves his brethren. He said that the attacker “shouted negative things about my religion and about my people.”

And that is why Israel is to blame.

You see, people hate Jews because Israel is such an awful country.

“People hear about the atrocities, the way the Zionist state is treating the nations around them, and they are angry about it,” Antebi told JTA. “I’m not surprised he did what he did, it’s human behavior. The one to blame is the Zionist state, which is doing a lot of bad things to people.”

Now we know that Antebi sympathizes with his attacker, apparently a fellow anti-Zionist.

His account of the incident is a bit much to believe. First of all, if the driver almost hit him, maybe, just maybe, Antebi was crossing the street without looking past his cell phone?

Not only did the driver supposedly stop his car, get out and shout at Antebi, the rabbi also claims the “dark-skinned” driver then ran after him when he asked a fishmonger to call the police. While the fishmonger refused, the driver attacked Antebi, who ended up in the hospital, where he was released after being treated for minor injuries.

Can you see this scene? A driver leaves his car in the street to run after an innocent Jew in order to attack him?

A spokesperson for the Amsterdam police told JTA police are investigating but are not certain the attack was anti-Semitic. “Currently, we are assuming it is an argument about traffic that got out of hand,” she said.

Neturei Karta blamed the attack on the “Zionist evil, which causes anti-Semitism all around the world, until even those who are truly observant and faithful Jews are liable to fall victim, and pay a high price for the Zionists’ sins.”

Antebi and his anti-Zionist cult know God’s system for reward and punishment.

But did it ever come to their minds, what is left of them, that maybe God is trying to tell something else to an anti-Zionist Israeli who is attacked by a Muslim who hates Jews?

Jewish Press blogger Paula Stern wrote, “The Muslim was being honest enough to know that there is no real difference between a Zionist and a Jew. The rabbi, however, remains stupidly blind to this simple fact.”

Stupidly Blind and Blindly Stupid

Monday, June 24th, 2013

A rabbi was attacked on the streets of Amsterdam yesterday. The rabbi was beaten, kicked and spat upon. The man who attacked him was a Muslim. Realizing by the anger and hatred of the man who approached him, the rabbi asked a passersby for help – but was ignored.

The attacker was probably blinded by hatred because he missed one key factor. The Jew he was beating was a member of Neturei Karta, an organization that is as anti-Zionist and anti-Israel as the Muslim attacker. Interestingly enough, the Muslim was being honest enough to know that there is no real difference between a Zionist and a Jew. The rabbi, however, remains stupidly blind to this simple fact.

This rabbi, who holds Israeli citizenship, belongs to an organization that has stood with Iran in calling for Israel to be wiped off the face of the earth. And in this incident, he proves the very reason why Israel must exist. For the Jews too stupid or too blind to realize it, Israel continues to provide a safe haven. Israel is a beacon of light, warning the world that there will never be another Holocaust.

At the President’s Conference, Bibi Netanyahu stood up and with the conviction we all feel, said, “I won’t allow it.” He was, of course, speaking for all Israel and for all Israelis.

Yes, a rabbi was beaten in Amsterdam because he wears the garb of the Jew and despite his blind stupidity in belonging to an organization that actually agrees with his attacker, he still became a victim of hatred.

In the logical world. the rabbi would realize his mistake; understand that to the man who attacked him, all Jews deserve to be beaten, and all of Israel is occupied and needs to be destroyed.

In the real world, the beaten rabbi would understand that ONLY through Israel, will the Jewish people avoid another Holocaust because when all is said and done, only Israel provides the protection, the haven, we need.

As the Syrian border heats up, nations pull their “peacekeeping” forces away. Yesterday – two things happened – a rabbi was beaten for being a Jew, even a blind and stupid one, and seven rockets were fired at Israel from Gaza.

The rabbi remains in the hospital; Israel’s air force flew into action this morning answering the attack by hitting multiple military targets.

I don’t expect the rabbi to become enlightened; I don’t expect Gaza to learn either.

May God bless the land and people of Israel, even the stupid ones, and may the Guardian of Israel protect our guardians, our sons and daughters who defend this land.

Neturey Karta Ask Obama for Protection from the Zionists

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

To the anti-Zionist faction Neturei Karta is attempting to exploit the difficult relationship between U.S. President Barack Obama and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, and to incite the former against the state of Israel. The Jerusalem Haredi neighborhood of Mea Shearim is awaiting Obama with American flags and a united call from the crowds to save hundreds of thousands of Jews from the “Zionists evil.”

Treating the president as if he was, at least, a Rosh Yeshiva, if not a Rebbe, the good people of Meah Shearim prepared special posters adorned with American flags on either side of a lovely shield that reads: The Agenda for the reception of his excellency Mr. Obama in the holy city of Jerusalem, 9 Nissan, 5773.

The poster itself reads, in text adorned by the five-pointed stars of the U.S. flag:

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The Haredi Jews of Jerusalem Headed by the Rabbis, may they live long, Congregates On Wednesday, 9 Nissan, 5773 At 1:30 in the afternoon At the Meah Shearim Plaza And from there the congregation will proceed carrying U.S. flags To receive his excellency the President And ask of him To liberate the Haredi Jewish community And the entire Holy Land From the grip of the Zionist bandits!

Signed: The Haredi community in the Holy Land.

The separatist community of Neturei Karta views the entire Zionist experience as an unholy act of defiance against the gentile world, costing many Jewish lives. Their stated submission to the visiting president will be accompanied with a request, printed on another wall poster, that he use his influence “to save hundreds of thousands of Jews from the evil harassments of the Zionists, who wish to force them to abandon their faith and even, God forbid, force them to serve in the Army – an act which defies the religion and any sense of justice and human morality – and to liberate us from the repression of the Zionist infidels.”

The ads further implore Obama, the “Exalted President,” that “his heart be awake and attentive to the suffering of the Jews who hold on to the original Jewish faith of thousands of years.”

They pray for him and bless him that, should he help them, “The God of Israel will do right by the one who does good for His people, and bring him years of tranquility and success, and wherever he turns he shall act wisely, for the sake of the great kingdom of the United States and all of humanity, as the president and his government wish.”

Neturei Karta Observe Arafat’s Yahrtzeit in Ramallah

Monday, November 12th, 2012

Last Sunday, representatives of Neturei Karta participated in the annual memorial service in Ramallah marking the day of the passing of PLO Chairman Yassir Arafat. They stood out in the crowd in their black clothes, each wearing identification tags over a background of a Palestinian flag.

During his speech at the gathering, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas restated his intention of petitioning the United Nation’s general assembly this month to grant the Palestinian Authority the status of an observer state.

Abbas said he is determined to carry out his plan, in spite of pressure and threats from the United States and Israel.

“We will make our request as early as this month, and, within a day or two, the Arab League will let us know exactly on which date this month to do it,” Abbas declared, adding: “Even though they don’t want us to petition the UN. We will not deny the legitimacy of Israel and we do not wish to deny it, but we do want to undermine the legitimacy of the settlements.”

Abbas also referred to the circumstances surrounding Arafat’s death eight years ago and said that Russian experts requested the Palestinian Authority to join the French and Swiss team which will investigate the “strange” death, as he put it.

Ahmadinejad Meets With Fringe Neturei Karta (Video)

Saturday, September 29th, 2012

Members of Neturei Karta, a radical, fringe sect of Jews met with Ahmadinejad in New York to express their common hatred for Jews and their desire to see the “peaceful dismantling of the [Zionist] state”.

Ahmadinejad concluded the meeting with the hope that he will be successful, while the Neturei Karta members wished Ahmadinejad much success.

In a Bizarro World, Ultra Orthodox Cult Keeps Anti-Independence Day

Thursday, April 26th, 2012

In the neighborhood of Meah She’arim, stronghold of the vehemently anti-Zionist sect of Neturei Karta, Israel’s Independence Day is traditionally kept as the inverse of the country’s national celebrations.

Many ads of all sizes have been posted around the neighborhood in recent days, in preparation for the anti-holiday. Nearly all of them are calling for prayer vigils and fasting on “The day the State of Israel and Zionism came into being.”

The website BeHadrei Haredim cites an ad signed by Neturei Karta, that says: “It has been sixty-four years of extreme taunts and reviling. Every day they taunt and revile at the heavens, crying ‘Who is there for me in Heaven.’ Even today, their desire is burning in their heart as they’re about to celebrate their day of independence, and raise their national flag to commemorate their festival, to immortalize their Zionist idol.”

The organizers are planning public mourning events on Thursday, in 18 synagogues across the country and around the world, in Jerusalem, Beit Shemesh, Bnei Brak, Monsey, and Williamsburg.

The Jerusalem procession will meet at Mea Shearim square, and then march through the streets of the city “clad in sackcloth.”

Rabbi Chanan Porat – The Shofar is Silent

Thursday, March 22nd, 2012

“A ‘Sabbath Jew’ he was—not because he showed his Jewishness once a week, but because his entire life was one of Sabbath: serenity, sanctity, and joy.” So said Rabbi Chanan Porat’s daughter at her father’s funeral, held in Kfar Etzion during Aseret Yemei Teshuvah this past year and attended by thousands of mourners.

A profound Torah scholar and man of action driven by a poetic soul and sparkling spirituality, Rabbi Porat succumbed to a malignant growth in his brain—the only thing that could stop his vigorous and vibrant love for God and the “holy triangle”—the Torah of Israel for the people of Israel in the Land of Israel.

As Judea-and-Samaria leader Yisrael Harel noted, Rabbi Porat, co-founder of the Gush Emunim settlement movement who passed away at age sixty-seven, was “one of the very few who was able, by virtue of his personality alone, without holding any public office or position of authority, to inspire thousands of people” to leave their homes, change their lives, and become part of the settlement enterprise in Yesha. This was due, no doubt, not only to his winning smile and remarkable charisma, but also to his sincere enthusiasm, integrity, and leadership abilities. Or in short, as Rabbi Yaakov Shapira, the rosh yeshivah of Mercaz HaRav, wrote, Rabbi Porat was the “shofar of the Land of Israel, without fear.” He broadcast loud and clear throughout the Jewish world the message that the Land of Israel is the home of the Jewish nation and the Torah.

The Early Years
At the age of twenty-four, as an IDF paratrooper, Rabbi Porat helped liberate Jerusalem during the Six-Day War. Shortly after, he led the group that pressured then Prime Minister Levi Eshkol to rebuild his childhood kibbutz, Kfar Etzion. Rabbi Porat had lived there, just south of Yerushalayim, until the age of four, when he and the other children, as well as the women, were evacuated out of fear that the Jordanians would capture the region. The Jordanians succeeded in capturing the kibbutz and destroying the community, as well as nearly all of the other defenders (many of whom had already surrendered), in the process. The Porat family never forgot their home, and when a shadow of an opportunity to return and rebuild presented itself, Rabbi Porat latched on to it and did not let go.

Rabbi Porat was not only one of the leaders of the surviving children of Kfar Etzion, leading them back nineteen years later in 1967 to re-establish the Jewish presence in Gush Etzion after Israel re-conquered the area. As mentioned, he also helped found Gush Emunim, the movement to resettle Yehuda, Shomron and Aza, in 1974, when Israeli society as a whole was feeling down in the aftermath of the Six-Day War. Ironically, despite the amazing victory, a general national malaise pervaded the country after the war and the revelation of Israel’s vulnerability. Rabbi Porat’s goal was to “raise the national spirit” and to this end, he—fresh off severe war wounds—together with others, set about settling the Shomron.

 A Lifetime of Accomplishment
Rabbi Porat’s activities were not limited to building Eretz Yisrael. He founded the Orot Chessed charity organization, worked for Ethiopian and Russian aliyah, and was wholly involved in a “meetings of the hearts” between the religious and secular.

He taught in several yeshivot and was a Knesset member for over ten years. Rabbi Porat later said that his proudest parliamentary achievement was having sponsored and ensured the passage of a law entitled “Do Not Stand by Your Neighbor’s Blood”—rendering it a legal duty to offer assistance to someone in mortal danger. Based on a verse in Vayikra, Rabbi Porat’s law ensures that sanctity of life is a national value not only in word, but in deed.

When Rabbi Porat spoke at the Mercaz HaRav thanksgiving ceremony shortly after the Six-Day War, a secular high school girl who heard him was moved to write some of her questions about Torah and Judaism to him. Rabbi Porat’s responses to her (and later, after she became observant, to her and her husband) over the next several years became a book entitled Et Achai Anochi Mevakesh, My Brothers I Seek. More than just an encapsulation of his love for the entire Jewish people, it deals with issues of life and death, faith and disbelief, religious coercion, rabbinical authority, marriage, and more—sprinkled with quotes from Chazal, from modern Hebrew poets, and from his own profound musings.

The last chapter, for example, describes in picturesque and lyrical detail a visit he made to the secular Kibbutz Ein Harod to pay a shivah call to a family who shared his attachment to the Land of Israel, where he was greeted like an old beloved friend. They talked deep into the night about issues such as the sanctity and lusciousness of the shemittah-year fruits he had brought them, the story of Rabbi Amnon of Mainz who was wracked by guilt for not having refused quickly enough to convert to Christianity, the solemn High Holiday Unetaneh Tokef prayer, and the need for the government to take a confident and independent stand against Israel’s enemies. Rabbi Porat left after midnight, and then, before dawn, nearly crashed into a group of stranded anti-Zionist Chassidim near Jericho whose car had two flat tires. While exchanging some Torah thoughts with them—with their glaring differences constantly in the background—Rabbi Porat lent them his spare tire and accompanied them back to Meah She’arim. He finally arrived home to Kfar Etzion just in time for the morning prayers.

Rabbi Porat concludes his story with an optimistic prayer that symbolizes his life: “Have mercy on the People of Israel,” I thought, biting my lips tightly. “How torn and ripped asunder they are, from one extreme to the other. How tired and wounded they are from their long nightmare of Exile and Holocaust; how confused and bewildered . . . How can we ever connect these ends that are so far apart? How do we build a bridge between the people of Ein Harod who have forgotten the holy Unetaneh Tokef prayer and the Neturei Karta people who turn their backs on and kick aside the State of Israel? Can we yet build something together, or is it too late?”

His answer was inspired by the vision of the Biblical Yosef walking northward along the same route he was then traversing to bring Yaakov Avinu’s regards to his hostile brothers: Yes! Despite all, Yaakov’s and Yosef’s home was not totally destroyed! The brotherly covenant was never broken! Yosef still lives! . . . And as he cried “My brothers I seek,” . . . an echo arose from the mountains: “My brothers . . . my brothers . . . my brothers . . . ”

“As one who grew up in the sheltered greenhouse of the [anti-religious] HaShomer HaTza’ir,” wrote a family friend in a consolation note to Rabbi Porat’s wife and eleven children, “I knew that the name Chanan Porat was a ‘red flag’—an image that the media arduously built up. But I am happy that I had the privilege of knowing your father from up close, seeing his sensitive heart [and] his all-around love for people . . . I am quite sure that my decisions leading me to [become religious] were nourished by the special Sabbaths and the Rosh Hashanah I spent with your family.”

No summation of Rabbi Porat’s life would be complete without noting the fortitude with which he accepted his fatal illness. With his body ravaged by cancer, his speech already slurred, Rabbi Porat remarked at one point, “Thank God! We thank God for every drop of life, for every breath.”

Asked how he was able to continue learning and teaching despite his pain and suffering, Rabbi Porat explained simply: “Rav Kook writes that the verse ‘Those who hope for Hashem will renew [lit., switch] strength’ means that they will replace their physical power with spiritual strength.”

Later, just a month before his death when his condition had deteriorated even more, a friend was visiting with him. Rabbi Porat began to recite Eishet Chayil to him, singing with a breaking voice, “Strength and beauty are her garb, she laughed at [her] last day.” Overcome with emotion at the mention of the symbolic words “the last day,” the friend said, “I have to go.”  “And Chanan,” the friend later recounted, “who always knew how to say what had to be said, without fear and without missing a beat, looked at me and repeated my words, slowly and clearly: ‘I have to go.’”

“I cried at the collapse of his body,” wrote the friend, “and stood amazed at the tremendous powers in his soul.”

 

Reprinted with permission from Jewish Action,  the magazine of the Orthodox Union (Vol. 72, no. 3).

Beit Shemesh Becomes Focus Of Growing Outrage Over Violent Religious Extremism

Wednesday, December 28th, 2011

JERUSALEM – Several thousand Israelis, from across the country’s religious and political spectrums, rallied in Beit Shemesh Tuesday evening against the growing number of attacks on local women and children by a group of radical haredim affiliated with the Sikrikim, a violent offshoot of Jerusalem’s Neturei Karta faction.

“Free Israel from religious coercion,” read one sign at the rally. “Stop Israel from becoming Iran,” read another.

The protesters came together at the urging of public officials – among them President Shimon Peres – and religious leaders including Rabbi Dov Lipman, a haredi member of the Beit Shemesh City Council, and Shas MK Rabbi Chaim Amsalem.

The incident that galvanized much of the country and concentrated its focus on Beit Shemesh occurred last week when 8-year-old Na’ama Margolis, the daughter of Orthodox American immigrants, was spat on by a member of the Sikrikim who claimed the girl was not dressed “modestly enough” as she walked to Orot Banot, a nearby Religious Zionist school.

Though police arrested Na’ama’s attacker, a Jerusalem judge released him less than 12 hours later. A crew from Israel’s Channel 2 TV News, which arrived in Beit Shemesh to film local reaction to the incident, was subsequently attacked by the Sikrikim.

After the Margolis story aired over the weekend, the dispute in Beit Shemesh became national news and the violence ratcheted up a notch.

On Sunday, haredi rioters surrounded and threw stones at city workers removing signs calling for the separation of the sexes on city streets. When haredi activists put up new signs to replace them, the police who returned to remove them Monday encountered rioting by about 300 haredi men who threw stones at police and burned trash cans.

Meir Dovid Eisenbach (center) was arrested Saturday night for the spitting attack on Na’ama Margolis. He was released on bail.

Beit Shemesh, with its mixed religious and non-religious population and its mushrooming ultra-Orthodox satellite, Ramat Beit Shemesh, is home to more than 80,000 residents, including hundreds of new immigrant families from North America and the UK. During the past five years several dozen Neturei Karta-affiliated families, who could no longer afford Jerusalem’s soaring real estate prices, moved into a new Beit Shemesh housing complex, adjacent to the neighborhood populated by Orthodox American and British immigrants.

Upon their arrival, the radicals attempted to intimidate both religious and non-religious residents by attempting to impose a strict “dress code” in and around their enclave. In recent months, members of the radical faction have become increasingly violent, hurling rocks at young girls who attend Orot Banot, calling them “sluts” and “shiksas.”

The group also began posting signs on public streets against men and women congregating within their enclave.

The mayor of Beit Shemesh, Moshe Abutbol, who was elected on a (haredi) Shas Party platform and who had been widely criticized by residents for caving into the demands of the radicals, abruptly changed course in the wake of the attack on Na’ama Margolis.

“There is no reason on earth for a person to raise a hand – let alone on helpless girls,” Abutbol said on Tuesday. Referring to other recent acts of violence perpetrated by local ultra-Orthodox men, the mayor said “there is no pardon for those who behave provocatively. Rioters should be treated with a firm hand.”

The attack on Margolis also prompted Rabbis Lipman and Amsalem to take action. Rabbi Lipman, who has semicha from Baltimore’s Ner Israel yeshiva and a master’s in education from Johns Hopkins University, made aliyah to Beit Shemesh with his wife and four children in 2004.

Rabbi Amsalem, who has been severely critical of Shas leader Eli Yishai, formed his own political faction, Am Shalem, earlier this year and recruited Rabbi Lipman to support his social activist agenda.

Beit Shemesh City Council Member Rabbi Dov Lipman (far left) and Shas MK Rabbi Chaim Amsalem (far right) light Chanukah candles at the home of the Margolis family on Monday evening. The spitting attack on 8-year-old Na’ama Margolis by a haredi extremist sparked outrage across Israel.

Rabbi Lipman told The Jewish Press he “got involved with local politics and this demonstration because I realized it was the right thing to do. However, I never imagined when I made aliyah in 2004 that this would be my calling. I am a haredi-American who is concerned about the future of Eretz Yisrael. We are against anyone who tries to force their way of life on everyone else. Beit Shemesh is not a haredi city. We, religious and non-religious citizens alike, are demonstrating for unity, not division. We are not here to drive anyone out of their homes. We want people to respect each other.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/israel/beit-shemesh-becomes-focus-of-growing-outrage-over-violent-religious-extremism/2011/12/28/

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