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July 30, 2016 / 24 Tammuz, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘New Jersey’

Mass Turnout at Funeral of IDF Lone Soldier Shlomo Rindenow, z’l

Tuesday, July 19th, 2016

by Tzvi Lev / TPS Hundreds of mourners thronged the funeral of IDF Sergeant Shlomo Rindenow, a lone soldier from New Jersey who died in an accident involving a grenade at his base in the Golan Heights on Sunday.

“Today is a day of mourning for us, for the family, for the army, and for the entire Jewish people everywhere,” said his brother, Jeff Rindenow, at the funeral service.

Rindenow, 20, from New Jersey and First Sergeant Husam Tafesh, 24, from Beit Jan, were killed when Tafesh’s grenade accidentally exploded. Three other soldiers were wounded in the blast, with one remaining in serious condition. It is still unclear why the grenade detonated, and the IDF is investigating the incident.

The service was held at the synagogue in Netzer Hazani, where Shlomo Rindenow’s brother resides. Shlomo Rindenow lived in Kibbutz Sde Yoav.

Rindenow was the fifth of his brothers to volunteer in the IDF as a lone soldier, a term used in Israel to describe those serving without any family in Israel, and his death has shaken the lone soldier community.

“It’s devastating,” said Mordy Botnick, founder of the lone-soldier-support organization Chayal El Chayal. “It has been happening way too much. Five lone soldiers have died in the past two years alone.”

Botnick was referring to lone soldiers Sean Carmeli, Max Steinberg, and Jordan Ben Simon, who were killed fighting in Operation Protective Edge in 2014. Another soldier, David Gordon, died soon after.

Rindenow was remembered by friends and family as someone who was always smiling and never stopped trying to help others. “Prior to enlistment, Shlomo worked as a dog handler for a search-and-rescue unit. He always wanted to assist others.”

TPS / Tazpit News Agency

American IDF Soldier Killed in Grenade Incident on Mount Hermon

Sunday, July 17th, 2016

Two IDF soldiers were killed and three wounded—one moderate and two light—from an exploding fragmentation grenade inside their vehicle Sunday morning, near the entrance to Mount Hermon and a military base in the Majdal Shams area. The injured soldiers were evacuated by helicopter to Maimonides Hospital in Haifa.

The two who were killed were Sergeant Shlomo Rindenau, 20, whose family lives in New Jersey; and Sergeant Hossam Tafesh, 24, from Beit Jan.

According to a preliminary report, the soldiers’ jeep stopped for an unknown reason near the Majdal Shams check post, about six feet from the wall; the driver, Tafesh, a reservist, got out of the jeep and was holding the grenade in his hand for a yet unknown reason. He surrounded the vehicle and approached the open door with the grenade, following which the grenade exploded and he and another soldier were killed.

So far, according to IDF sources, the entire event is still a mystery.

David Israel

Analysis: Bernie Sanders May Be the First Jewish US Vice President

Sunday, May 22nd, 2016

Connecticut Senator Joe Lieberman in 2000 was supposed to be crowned America’s first Jewish VP. Now, as the Democratic primaries are rolling to the finish line, there’s a solid chance that Vermont Senator, Brooklyn born Bernie Sanders, would be the first to have that honor.

When ABC’s “This Week” host George Stephanopoulos had this exchange:

Stephanopoulos: If you don’t, sir, and this is my final question, you open to being considered as Secretary Clinton’s running mate?

Sanders: It’s a little bit early to talk about that. Right now, our function is to do everything I can, George — and you’re going to see me running all over California, we’re in New Mexico now — we’re going to do everything that we can to get every vote and every delegate that we can and go into that convention with as much momentum as is possible.

Stephanopoulos: Didn’t hear a no, Senator. We’ll be talking to you soon. Take care.

Candidate Clinton for her part said on NBC’s “Meet the Press” that she is open to a wide variety of possible running mates. She mentioned Dallas Mavericks owner businessmen Mark Cuban, who said he’d like to be either Clinton’s or Trump’s VP.

Now, that’s keeping your options open.

With very few primaries left — California, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Dakota and South Dakota and that’s it, Sanders stands no realistic chance of significantly cutting Hillary’s lead of 274 pledged delegates, never mind her 486 super-delegates. All Clinton needs to do at this point in order to win the Democratic nomination is to pick up only 90 of the remaining 939 outstanding delegates. Sanders must win 850. So that’s not going to happen.

But Bernie Sanders has a major advantage over Hillary Clinton in the national polls, which she cannot deny: while Clinton and Trump are split in major national polls, and over the past two weeks have been trading the same 2 to 3 points between them, meaning they are essentially tied, Bernie Sanders whips Trump by double digits in almost every single major poll.

It’s always dangerous to use May polls as an indication of the voter’s will come November, and national polls are even less reliable than state polls because you never know how the sample of 600 to 2,000 respondents was distributed, and whether the distribution in May has anything to say about November. But one point is clear today: while most voters openly dislike both Hillary and Trump, and vote for either one of them as the lesser of two evils — the same voters actually like Sanders.

Which is why it’s rare for Sanders to beat Trump in those national polls with less than a two digit lead. This is going to be part of Bernie Sanders’ camp’s argument in Philadelphia this summer: Bernie can get the voters out, Bernie ignites their imagination. Hillary, even if she wins in November, will do so with a few votes over the split, and without coattails, meaning both houses of Congress will remain Republican.

When Sanders is urging the super-delegates to take “an objective look” at which candidate has a better shot at beating Trump in November, he’s talking about these national polls. Sanders has also condemned the entire institution of super-delegates, saying it is unfair and is part of an “anointment process,” rather than free and open elections.

Hillary has not expressed any degree of enthusiasm about doing with Sanders what her husband did with Al Gore in 1992 and 1996. “I am going to be the nominee and want to spend my time taking on Trump,” Clinton said. She urged Sanders to face the realities of the election process, reminding him that “we are stronger together.” She also noted that the differences between herself and Sanders on the issues “pale in comparison to Donald Trump,” suggesting that “most of his [Sanders’] supporters understand that as well.”

But should Sanders, with his considerable cache of both voters and money, decides to play hardball even after Hillary had picked up her 90 votes and crossed the finish line, would he be able to exact from the winner the ultimate price for his cooperation? The chances of that look better than 50-50 today.

Salon wrote this weekend: “Hillary must pick Bernie for VP: She may even need him more than he needs her.” Salon noted a Rasmussen poll found that 36 percent of likely Democratic voters want Clinton to name Sanders as her running mate – almost double the 19 percent of voters supporting the next most popular vice presidential contender, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren. You’ll note that Sen. Warren is a lot closer to Sanders’ politics, especially on Wall Street, than Hillary’s.

And Politicus USA pointed on Sunday: “Bernie Sanders would bring Independents and lock down younger voters for Hillary Clinton. Sanders also attacks Donald Trump with a zeal and conviction that would throw the Republican off of his game for the entire fall. … Hillary Clinton could do a whole lot worse for herself than putting Bernie Sanders on the ticket.”

JNi.Media

Bill Clinton: ‘I Killed Myself to Give Palestinians a State’ [video]

Saturday, May 14th, 2016

Campaigning on Friday for his wife, Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton, in Ewing Township, NJ, former president Bill Clinton told his audience “I killed myself to give the Palestinians a state,” Politico reported.

When a person in the audience yelled, “What about Gaza?” Clinton responded, “She and the Muslim Brotherhood president of Egypt stopped the shooting war between Israel and Hamas in Gaza.”

“She said neutrality is not an option,” the person in the crowd yelled back, meaning the US would always be on israel’s side.

“Depends on whether you care what happens to the Palestinians, as opposed to the Hamas government and the people with guided missiles,” Clinton said.

“They were human beings in Gaza,” the same audience member said.

“Yes, they were,” Clinton replied. “And Hamas is really smart. When they decide to rocket Israel, they insinuate themselves in the hospitals, in the schools, in the highly populous areas, and they are smart. They said they try to put Israelis in a position of either not defending themselves or killing innocents. They’re good at it. They’re smart. They’ve been doing this a long time.”

The audience responded with cheers to the Clinton comeback.

Then Bill Clinton said, “I killed myself to give the Palestinians a state. I had a deal they turned down that would have given them all of Gaza.”

And then some.

David Israel

NJ State Senate Unanimously Rejects BDS for Pension Fund

Tuesday, May 10th, 2016

The New Jersey State Senate has unanimously rejected the Palestinian Authority-led Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement.

A bill requiring the state’s public worker pension fund to divest from companies that boycott Israel was approved in a 39-0 vote, NJ.com reported Monday.

The State Assembly must still vote on the measure (S1923), however. Under the legislation, the state Division of Investments would be unable to invest the public workers’ $68.6 billion pension fund in companies that support the boycott.

Those funds already invested with such companies must be removed within the next 18 months, except for companies providing “humanitarian aid to the Palestinian people through either a governmental or non-governmental organization (NGO) unless it is also engaging in prohibited boycotts.”

New Jersey has one of the largest Jewish populations in the United States. But the state also prohibits its pension fund from investing in businesses with ties to Iran, Sudan and Northern Ireland.

“New Jersey cannot support such biased practices as those of the BDS against our sister state,” state Senate Majority Leader Loretta Weinberg (D-Bergen) said in a statement.

“Israel has long been a vibrant trading partner, ally and friend with our state, and making sure that we are not investing in any company that seeks to hurt the interests of Israel or its people through boycotts, divestments and sanctions will send a clear message that we stand against this kind of veiled discrimination.”

“I think this bill sends a very clear message to our friends in Israel that New Jersey has your back,” State Senator Jim Beach (D-Camden) added.

Hana Levi Julian

Breaking: Bomb Threats Lock Down 8 Schools Northern New Jersey

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

Students in several northern New Jersey high schools were forced to leave their classrooms due to a bomb threat Wednesday.

Bomb threats were reported Wednesday at eight schools in New Jersey, according to local media. North Jersey schools received bomb threats in an automated call on Wednesday morning, according to the NorthJersey.com website. Not all were in session: some are on spring break this week.

New Jersey has received threats several times before; in January 11 schools received robo-call messages routed through California that made references to explosives or mass shootings.

Among the schools targeted Wednesday morning were Fair Lawn High School (spring break); Midland Park Junior/Senior High School (in session); Hawthorne High School (in session); Lodi High School (in session), Paramus High School (in session), Dwight Morrow High School in Paramus (spring break) and Passaic Valley High School in Little Falls (in session).

The threats came a day after a presentation at Passaic High School warning students about the consequences of calling in fake threats. There have been eight bomb threats called in to that school so far this year. Wednesday was not one of those days, however: on Tuesday, sappers from the Passaic County Sheriff’s office met with half of the school, and were scheduled to meet with more students on Wednesday.

Schools in Bergen and Passaic counties have been targeted with bomb threats in recent months as well.

Last month classes were interrupted in nine Bergen County districts after schools received bomb threats that turned out to be fake. At least one school was evacuated and several others received “shelter in place” orders. In February five New Jersey schools received bomb threats and at least two were evacuated.

There’s been a rash of bomb threats robocalled into dozens of schools in the eastern United States this week, closing classes and forcing authorities to evacuate schools. Some schools were located as far west as Indiana.

Several schools in Massachusetts also received bomb threats this week. On Monday (April 11), State Police spokesperson David Procopio said “numerous “ threats were received at schools in Hudson, Hopkinton, and Leominster. Cambridge, Marlboro and Brookline high schools also received automated robo-call bomb threats. The schools were evacuated and police swept the buildings. Melrose high school and middle school were also threatened, and faced a temporary “shelter in place” order.

A similar string of robo-call bomb threats were recorded on voice mail in Lake County, Indiana Monday night, prompting the closure of nine schools in Lake County, Indiana for Tuesday. But by the afternoon an unidentified suspect was in custody. The school superintendent said in a statement released later in the day, “It is important to share with everyone that the individual who is in custody did not have the capacity to carry out the threats that were made on the 911 calls.”

Hana Levi Julian

Trump Tripped Up But Not Trapped by KKK ‘Shout Out’

Monday, February 29th, 2016

GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump walked straight into a mine field Sunday when he told CNN’s State of the Union interviewer that he didn’t “know anything about” former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard David Duke.

“Voting for these people, voting against Donald Trump at this point, is really treason to your heritage,” Duke had said last week on the David Duke Radio Program.

The New York-based Anti-Defamation League (ADL) immediately called on Trump to condemn Duke and the KKK. (The organization also followed up its demand by launching a campaign to educate all the candidates about extremism and hate groups.)

CNN’s Jake Tapper asked Trump whether he was prepared to condemn Duke and the KKK, as the ADL had asked him to do.

Duke meanwhile had also posted a long post supporting Trump on his Facebook page a few days earlier, together with denials of any current connection with the KKK and self-congratulatory, anti-Semitic harangues about being “the most well-known American who reveals the facts of the Jewish tribalist takeover of our media.”

Trump seemed to be caught unawares, and did a backstep.

“Honestly, I don’t know David Duke. I don’t believe I’ve ever met him. I’m pretty sure I didn’t meet him. And I just don’t know anything about him,” Trump replied. “Just so you understand, I don’t know anything about David Duke, OK?” he said. “I don’t know anything about what you’re even talking about with white supremacy or white supremacists.”

But after the interview, Trump recalled he had already disavowed Duke and his former racist colleagues at a news conference last Friday – a fact he tweeted after the program.

It’s not even the first time he has done so; Trump also had disavowed Duke in February 2000, according to Politico.

Trump was asked about Duke by reporters at that time and said then that he disavowed him. He responded to a withering storm of criticism following Sunday’s show by sharing a clip of his answer on Twitter.

The exchange precedes Super Tuesday, during which a dozen states, most of which are in the South, are set to go to the polls for primary elections.

Trump meanwhile has picked up two key endorsements, including one from a major player in the South.

U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions endorsed Donald Trump on Sunday at a rally held in his home state of Alabama, saying, “This is not a campaign, this is a movement.” Sessions is the first Senator to endorse Trump.

But he has also already received endorsements over the weekend from Govs. Chris Christie of New Jersey, Paul LePage of Maine, and former Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer.

The growing swell of support could be a sign that Republican Party leaders are starting to accept that Trump will likely be their nominee.

“I can guarantee you that the one person that Hillary and Bill Clinton do not want to see on that stage come next September is Donald Trump,” Christie said during his endorsement on Friday.

“They do not know the play book with Donald Trump because… he is rewriting the play book of American politics. He is providing strong leadership that is not dependent upon the status quo.”

Christie said he would lend his support to help Trump from now until the election and then after as well. The remark gives rise to speculation that perhaps he and Trump have discussed a position for Christie in a future Trump administration.

Hana Levi Julian

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/trump-tripped-up-but-not-trapped-by-kkk-shout-out/2016/02/29/

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