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May 22, 2015 / 4 Sivan, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘North Korea’

N. Korea Claims to Have Fired Missile

Sunday, May 10th, 2015

North Korea claims to have fired a new ballistic missile from a submarine on Saturday, according to a Fox News report.

South Korea reported that North Korea fired three anti-ship cruise missiles.

The U.S. State Department said the launches are violations of U.N. Security Council resolutions.

North Korea Will Nuke US If It ‘Forces Our Hand’

Thursday, May 7th, 2015

A senior North Korean official told CNN Thursday that the country will use a nuclear weapon to strike the American mainland if the United States “forced their hand.”

The rare interview was conducted with Park Yong Chol, deputy director of the regime-linked DPRK think thank called the Institute for Research into National Reunification.

Park said North Korea needs to continue developing its nuclear arsenal, which he said can hit American soil, to “counter the U.S. threat.”

When questioned about” human rights abuses in North Korea, Park fired back, “The U.S. President and other high-ranking administration officials have acknowledged really severe forms of punishment on inmates in detention. If you talk about human rights in the DPRK, we will talk about human rights in the U.S.”

Park’s threat to use nuclear weapons if the United States “forced its hands” is particularly worrisome because of the country’s close links with Iran and Tehran’s development of a nuclear warhead. North Korea has provided technologies to Iran, and an alleged Israeli strike on a nuclear facility under construction in northern Syria four years ago killed several North Korean scientists.

Park’s claim that North Korea can nuke the United States is not accepted by many American officials, but there is no questioning the threat to U.S. bases in South Korea.

The Breaking Defense website reported that former Pentagon strategist Van Jackson said that American missile defenses in the Pacific are “woefully outgunned” and that Patriot launchers and Navy ships could not defend American bases.

Diplomacy with North Korea not only has failed but also has allowed it to become a nuclear power.

Given North Korea’s close ties with Iran, it is far from certain that the Obama administration is not repeating the same scenario with its negotiations with the Islamic Republic over the future of its nuclear program.

Lausanne Talks May Be Camouflage for Iranian Nukes in North Korea

Monday, March 30th, 2015

Iran’s dragging on the negotiations with the P5+1 on an agreement covering its nuclear program may be one of the biggest con jobs in modern history, camouflaging secret nuclear development in  North Korea, which has been providing technology and advice to Tehran.

North Korea was caught red-handed helping the construction of a nuclear facility in Syria, heavily backed by Iran, when Israel bombed the site in 2007.

The Daily Beast reported Monday that Iran since 2012 has deployed personnel at a North Korean military base near China, which along with Russia has been the biggest investor in Iran’s program to reach nuclear capability.

North Korea, which already is a nuclear threat to the world, would love to see Iran in possession of a nuclear bomb to help it threaten the West. Evil always has an insatiable appetite for more evil.

Iran is the trickiest of tricksters. It has pulled the wool over the eyes of the Obama administration and its predecessors, which is not difficult considering that their foreign policy advisers are blind to foreign cultures and assume everyone in the world thinks like and acts like Americans and that shaking hands means a deal is a deal.

The talks in Lausanne are a great stage for the Islamic Republic to act as if it is hanging on to every possibility to refuse to concede to the West, as if doing so would delay its being able to point a nuclear weapon at Israel.

But if a deal finally signed, and if that happens it won’t be much before one minute before President Barack Obama’s self-imposed deadline, it won’t take into account possible Iranian nuclear development in North Korea. The menace from the Far East has sent hundreds  of scientists and technicians to Iranian sites.

Tehran also has a healthy, or unhealthy, delegation in North Korea. The Daily Beast reported.

Larry Niksch of the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C., estimates that the North’s proceeds from this trade with Iran are ‘between $1.5 billion and $2.0 billion annually…..

Iran has bought a lot with its money. Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, thought to be Tehran’s chief nuclear scientist, was almost certainly in North Korea at Punggye-ri in February 2013 to witness Pyongyang’s third atomic test. Reports put Iranian technicians on hand at the site for the first two detonations as well.

The North Koreans have also sold Iran material for bomb cores, perhaps even weapons-grade uranium….

In 2011, The Trumpet wrote,” Bruce Bennett, a senior defense analyst for the Rand Corporation, an intelligence company used by the U.S. military, says, “There’ve been stories of Iranians at the nuclear tests in North Korea. So if information is really being shared then you’ve got a much more dangerous situation, because most people would argue that the North Korean nuclear program is out ahead of Iran, and we don’t want Iran having that assistance.”

So let’s say Iran signs an agreement – and remember, this in only a “framework” agreement, one of the Obama administration’s favorite terms and which always turns out to be a basis for more concessions in a supposed final agreement.

A deal would not prevent Iran from buying enriched uranium from North Korea, and the Islamic Republic will have plenty of cash to do so because a deal will be accompanied by the removal of sanctions.

If a deal is signed by midnight March 31, Iran can celebrate April Fool’s Day by opening up its sites for inspection, after all traces of nuclear weapons research are removed, and carry on  freely in North Korea to assemble a nuclear weapon.

The Daily Beast wrote very succinctly:

The  Iranians could be busy assembling the components for a bomb elsewhere. In other words, they will be one day away from a bomb—the flight time from Pyongyang to Tehran—not one year as American and other policymakers hope.

It also pointed out the obvious other probable partner in evil, namely China, which has invested millions in Iran’s nuclear infrastructure. China previously has violated U.N. Security Council resolutions by sending to Iran materials that could be used for building atomic bombs.

Nasrallah is Angry As Iran’s Isolation Grows

Sunday, March 29th, 2015

Iran’s puppet in Lebanon, Hezbollah chieftain Hassan Nasrallah, is angry.

He’s angry at Saudi Arabia for attacking the Iranian-backed Houthi rebels, trying to prevent Iran from taking over Yemen.

He’s angry at Palestinian Authority chieftain Mahmoud Abbas, who openly expressed support for Saudi Arabia.

He hasn’t said anything yet about Hamas, but they also expressed support for Yemen and the Saudi coalition.

As Iran makes its way to becoming the North Korea of the Middle East, Nasrallah is angry that Iran isn’t receiving support from his fellow anti-Israel terrorist groups.

But it makes sense, the Middle East is breaking back down into its traditional battle lines.

The Iranian Shi’ites and the Hezbollah Shi’ites are fighting against the Syrian citizens, who are mostly Sunnis.

Hamas and Fatah (Palestinian Authority) are mostly Sunnis, and they probably aren’t thrilled their fellow Sunnis are being killed by Shi’ites.

And as much as all the Muslim groups hate Israel, they hate each other even more.

So now, when the expansionist Islamic Republic of Iran starts openly trying to create their Shi’ite hegemony in the Middle East, backed by nuclear weapons, alliances will naturally shift from the convenient enemy (Israel) to the real enemy (their fellow Muslims).

Nasrallah is angry. But he shouldn’t be.

He’s just been locked in his bomb shelter so long he’s forgotten what the real world really about.

Indie Theaters Rushing to get the “The Interview”

Wednesday, December 24th, 2014

Sony Pictures will release it’s comedy film “The Interview” in a limited release to independent theaters for a December 25 opening.

More than 300 theaters throughout the US have already placed orders to get the film.

Sony was apparently not expecting so many theaters to want to show the film following the terror threats, but the demand is very high, Sony is apparently having some logistic difficulties getting so many to everyone at the last minute.

The original wide-scale release was cancelled due to security concerns.

Some US theaters have already sold out their opening day showings.

Sony is also planning a simultaneous VOD release.

President Obama applauded the decision to not give into the cyber-terrorism threat, believed to have originated from North Korea.

UN Security Council Considers North Korean Alleged Crimes Against Humanity

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014

For the first time, North Korea’s record on human rights has been placed on the agenda for discussion at the United Nations Security Council. The nuclear-status nation is led by capricious 31-year-old Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un, whose mood swings and rages are legend both in the country and abroad.

Until now, the Council has focused primarily on the issue of North Korea’s nuclear activities and the threat they pose. In response to its violations of UN mandates nixing nuclear and ballistic tests, the Council imposed sanctions on Pyongyang that have caused severe economic hardship, but as is the case with Iran have not persuaded the country’s regime to change course.

Ultimately, the Council may consider whether or not to hold the North Korean government responsible for its alleged crimes against humanity.

The United States called Pyongyang a “living nightmare” for North Korean citizens at the first meeting held by the Council, held Monday despite an initial attempt from China to block it. The meeting opened with a procedural raised-hand vote that showed 11 of the 15 Council members supported placing the issue of North Korea’s human rights record on the agenda. China and Russia voted against; Chad and Nigeria abstained.

Testimony was compiled from North Korean exiles by a UN commission of inquiry that left no doubt as to the brutality of the country’s regime, according to U.S. envoy Samantha Power. The unprecedented talks included review of testimony from a former prison camp survivor who told of picking kernels of corn from cattle dung to stave off starvation. A former guard testified about prison wardens who routinely raped their prisoners.

In February 2014, an investigation by the United Nations found that up to 120,000 people are being held in North Korean prison camps. The report also detailed numerous cases of summary executions, torture and rape, leading the inquiry to conclude that North Korea was committing human rights violations “without parallel in the contemporary world,” ordered at the highest level of the state.

No decision was taken on Monday in response to a call to refer Pyongyang to the International Criminal Court at The Hague. But three of the five permanent members of the Council – the U.S., Britain and France – as well as Australia and others, said the Council should consider action on the issue.

“Rarely has such an extensive charge sheet of international crimes been brought to the Council’s attention,” said UN assistant secretary-general for human rights, Ivan Simonovic.

Plot Thickens in Sony Pictures North Korea Hack Attack Saga

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014

The plot appears to be thickening in the Sony-North Korea hack attack saga.

A cascade of events has followed the FBI’s accusation that North Korea is behind the attacks – and threats – aimed at preventing Sony Entertainment Pictures from releasing its comedy film, ‘The Interview.’

North Korea now seems to be experiencing widespread Internet outages. An expert quoted by Associated Press said late Monday the country’s online access was “completely down.”

National Security Council spokesperson Bernadette Meehan said, “We have no new information to share regarding North Korea today. If in fact North Korea’s Internet has gone down, we’d refer you to that government for comment.”

The White House also had no comment. Referring to U.S. government responses to recent threats from North Korea, State Department spokesperson Marie Harf told reporters enigmatically, “Some will be seen, some may not be seen.”

On Friday, a government official quoted by The New York Times said the U.S. would ask China to block North Korea’s Internet access as a means of dealing with the threats emanating from Pyongyang.

“What we are looking for is a blocking action, something that would cripple their efforts to carry out attacks,” the official said. According to the report, virtually all of North Korea’s telecommunications run through Chinese-operated networks.

China has already condemned the movie, calling it an act of “senseless cultural arrogance.”

It is also hard to gauge China’s reaction to any U.S. request to rein in North Korea, given that five hackers working for the Chinese military were indicted by the Justice Department in May. They were charged with stealing sensitive information from U.S. companies.

Nevertheless, North Korean Internet accessibility appears to be down, at least for now.

Meanwhile, a hacker that might be associated with the well-known Anonymous hacker collective claimed on Twitter from an account that was suspended over the weekend, @TheAnonMessage, that i t would release the movie, “The Interview” this Thursday over the Internet anyway – just as a “Christmas present” to web surfers.

“We’re not with either side, we just want to watch the movie too… Banning movies only because North Korea’s dictator disapproves. What’s next, @RedDawnFilm?”

The sneers came in response to the latest nasty message sent to the FBI from the Guardians of Peace (GOP) hacker group, believed to be a front for North Korea.

(Yes I know it’s hard to keep all these threads straight – it may help to think of it as a war between the Crips and the Bloods.)

“Praising” the FBI for its investigation, the GOP hacker group sent a link to a video which repeats !”“You are an idiot,” over and over in animated lettering.

Enter Anonymous.

A message to Sony Entertainment CEO Michael Lynton from that group was posted on the ‘Pastebin’ site (where GOP has been posting) this past Friday. This time Sony is being exhorted to “release The Interview as planned” or Anonymous will “carry out as many hacks” as possible to Lynton and Sony Entertainment.

Neither threat can be verified; they were both posted on the Pastebin website in plain text, and could have been written by anyone. Neither is traceable.

But as the Mashable website points out, members of the LulzSec hackers affiliated with Anonymous were convicted for involvement in a 2011 hack attack on Sony Pictures.

The current saga actually began in June when North Korea demanded the White House intervene with Sony and squelch production of The Interview, a comedy about assassinating North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un. It was scheduled for release this Thursday, December 25.

When the U.S. government did not stop producers, and the movie was completed, a massive hack attack was carried out against Sony. Emails containing information from company executives and employees plus other corporate data was released to the public along with a warning not to screen the movie, “The Interview” in any theater.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/plot-thickens-in-sony-pictures-north-korea-hack-attack-saga/2014/12/23/

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