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November 27, 2014 / 5 Kislev, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘NYPD’

When Political Correctness Gets In The Way Of Fighting Crime

Wednesday, August 8th, 2012

Although by all accounts the NYPD’s stop and frisk program resulted in a significant drop in major violent crime, activists from minority communities made an issue of the fact that most of those stopped and frisked were blacks and Hispanics, many of whom were innocent of any crime.

Indeed, blacks and Hispanics make up about half of New York City’s population but were involved in more than 85 percent of the approximately 700,000 stops conducted by police last year. And the procedure is an enormously intrusive one, usually involving a person police deem suspicious being told to “assume the position” with legs spread and arms pressed against a wall or automobile.

That being said, political correctness has now gotten in the way of dealing with a serious problem that, ironically, disproportionately affects blacks and Hispanics, who are victimized by violent crime at a rate significantly higher than whites.

As the protests over stop and frisk gathered steam, Mayor Bloomberg took to the pulpit of a predominantly black church in Brooklyn and declared that the policy must be “mended, not ended.” Police Commissioner Kelly pledged in May to institute additional oversight, training and outreach to prevent racial profiling. While both men are to be commended for implementing and defending the stop and frisk policy, they seemed to have blinked in the face of the controversy.

Over the past few months the number of times police officers have stopped, questioned and frisked people in New York City has dropped by 34 percent – and major crimes have risen by more than 12 percent during that period.

Thus, as the New York Post noted in an Aug. 4 editorial, “there were 24,751 major crimes committed between Jan. 1 and March 31, a period when cops stopped 203,500 individuals and recovered 881 guns, according to sources. In the following three months – between April 1 and June 30 – the number of stop-and-frisks cops conducted fell to 133,934 and the crime figures shot up to 27,832. The numbers of guns seized fell to 732.”

We would also point out the depressing upsurge of shooting incidents in black neighborhoods, often involving a child or young adult.

In addition to conducting rallies and protests, the New York Civil Liberties Union has commenced a class-action lawsuit challenging the stop and frisk policy, claiming that targeting individuals without more proof of possible wrongdoing than the NYPD requires violates the constitution.

Mayor Bloomberg responded rather pointedly: “If the NYCLU is allowed to determine policing strategies in our city, many more children will grow up fatherless and many more children will not grow up at all…. Let’s be clear. The NYCLU’s priority is not protecting our safety, it is protecting their ideology….”

So the dilemma is palpable. At least on the face of it, stop and frisk appears to have had a salutary effect in keeping crime reasonably under control. But this is America and we have a deep-rooted and cherished tradition of individual freedoms for all Americans, including the right to be left alone. This is of special concern to members of the Jewish community, a minority that knows all too well the consequences of being singled out for special treatment.

NYPD Increasing Protection of Jewish Sites After Bulgarian Bombing

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

The New York City Police Department is stepping up its presence at synagogues and in Jewish neighborhoods the wake of yesterday’s deadly bus bombing in Bulgaria, reports NY1.

The website cites NYPD officials who say that critical response vehicles have been re-deployed as a precaution.

Residents of the Upper East Side told NY1 Thursday morning that increased police presence has become a routine sight.

“I think there’s usually a very large police presence in this neighborhood anyway, so I didn’t really notice that much of a difference. I mean, I do notice sometimes that they’re more here than in others, there’s more of a presence, but I think it’s to be expected,” said an Upper East Side local.

The NYPD says there are no specific threats against the city.

City police took similar precautions in March, after three children and a rabbi were gunned down in Toulouse, France.

On The Scene: MVA 6/21/12

Thursday, June 21st, 2012

MVA on the corner of 16th Avenue & 50th street. A grey colored sedan collided with a man riding a scooter early Thursday afternoon.

FDNY, as well two officers from the NYPD, are on the scene. The NYPD has informed us that the man on the scooter is being treated for light injuries.

Everything’s Coming Up Jihad

Thursday, June 14th, 2012

June has been a banner month for Muslim lawsuits against the NYPD. First “Muslim Advocates” filed a lawsuit against the NYPD on behalf of some New Jersey Muslims attending mosques that the NYPD had assessed as a potential terrorism risk. The Muslim Advocates, like every other Muslim “civil rights” group, has a history of covering up and defending terrorism.

The media is full of sympathetic interviews with Muslims, who are baffled as to why the NYPD might be surveiling mosques and Imams. Farhoud Khera, the head of Muslim Advocates, complains, “There was explicit reference to the fact that they weren’t targeting Syrian Jews or Iranian Jews or Egyptian Christians, but really, the focus was on Muslims.”

The extensive Coptic Christian and Persian Jewish terrorism sprees aside, the goal here is to get the NYPD to play the same “Three Blind Monkeys” game that Federal law enforcement has taken up. And the only answer is the TSAization of the NYPD, as the last remaining counterterrorism force will prove that it isn’t singling out Muslims, by surveiling Methodist churches and Chassidic synagogues for signs of terrorist sympathies.

Less notable, but in some ways more significant, Farhan Doe, a Muslim rejected by the NYPD because he said gays should be imprisoned, has sued the police for rejecting him because of his views. Farhan Doe isn’t alone in believing that, but unlike non-Muslim applicants, he comes out of a cultural and religious background in which imprisoning people because they offend your morals is the duty of law enforcement.

Farhan’s (predictably, Jewish) lawyer says that his client has the right to believe whatever he pleases, and he has a point. But the question is with enough Farhans in the political, judicial and enforcement arms, how long will the rest of us have that right?

Tolerating people who will not tolerate you is fine, so long as they draw the line between ideas and action. The NYPD isn’t surveilling New Jersey mosques because there are some bigots in blue who dislike immigrants, as the Associated Press, the American Civil Liberties Union and the whole lawyer-media complex would like you to believe. It’s doing it because New York City’s biggest serial killers and aspiring serial killers are Muslims who kill in the name of their ideas.

Their biggest idea is that Allah had sent Mohammed to make Islam “victorious over all religions, even though the infidels may resist” (Koran 61:9). And when the infidels resist, that’s when you kill their soldiers, sue their police officers, and blow up a few buildings. Then you complain to the media that the infidels are persecuting you by spying on the mosques where the “Big Idea” is declaimed to the faithful and refusing to allow you to join the police force just because you think that Islamic law supersedes American law.

The Clash of Civilizations is all-encompassing. It doesn’t just cover the big thing, like ramming planes into skyscrapers, but also the little things. Police forces don’t enforce law, as much as social harmony. The Nineties were a grand experiment in changing troubled neighborhoods by improving their quality through selective enforcement on quality of life offenses. The NYPD’s successes were credited to that experiment. But who decides what social harmony and the social good are?

For Mayor Bloomberg, it’s banning large sodas. For Farhan Doe, it’s banning homosexuals. When there is no limit to government infringement on rights, then the law is a collection of bugbears and control mechanisms. Islamic law on covering up women got its start when one of Mohammed’s companions spotted one of Mo’s wives at night and was able to tell her apart due to her height. This somehow made for a convincing case for compelling every woman to be covered up head to toe.

It’s senseless, but so is fighting obesity by banning people from buying large sodas. When the obsession of a few men is turned into law, then the result is equally contemptuous of the individual as a rotting sack of vile habits which he has to be forced to abandon by the majority of the law. Once you abandon the rights of the individual to the fiat of activists, judges and politicians– then laws can be made by anyone who wants them badly enough. The same process of judicial activism, hysteria, violent attacks, and pressure groups that created gay marriage can one day lock up the happy couples. It’s only a matter of who is making the laws.

Thanking The NYPD Is The Least We Can Do

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

The recent shooting of four police officers in the normally tranquil Sheepshead Bay neighborhood of Brooklyn (bringing the total to eight cops shot so far this year) has confirmed a dangerous double standard that threatens the safety of police officers and all New Yorkers throughout New York. It must be confronted.

City police officers are being shot in frightening numbers, with heroes like Peter Figoski paying the ultimate price, killed in the line of duty just for doing his job. Yet the larger public is noticeably, even if unintentionally, absent from championing those officers who put everything on the line every day.

Worse yet, the ACLU-types who never miss an opportunity to vilify and malign Commissioner Kelly and the NYPD for any and every mistake (real or perceived) a police officer makes are conspicuously absent when cops are being used for target practice all across the city.

Instead of recognizing the inherent risks and difficulties of keeping millions of New Yorkers safe and applauding the grace and restraint police officers have repeatedly shown under fire, the armchair critics incessantly continue to heap on criticism and refuse to acknowledge the realities of keeping our city safe (while failing to offer an iota of constructive criticism).

Perennial publicity hounds like the Reverend Al Sharpton, who have made careers out of putting personal ambition and political theater ahead of public safety, exacerbate tensions instead of calming them.

Dedicated crime fighters deserve our staunch support and require the true and tried tools available, under the law, to go about their all-important task of keeping all New Yorkers safe. Second-guessing by clueless libertarians and partisan politicians is counterproductive and insulting to those of us who live and work here. We know the NYPD has made the quality of life for all New Yorkers significantly better. It is time we all said so publicly.

For the silent majority – the law abiding citizens – the NYPD has been doing a masterful job navigating the balancing act of keeping New York City safe while faithfully upholding the civil liberties U.S. law guarantees all citizens.

Are the police perfect? Is anybody? There are bad apples in every profession and the NYPD is not immune. Police officers who engage in wrongful acts should be held to the highest standards, but bad behavior by a handful of police officers should not instigate a broad indictment of the entire department and its practices.

Recently, ten Congressional Democrats, including a member of the party’s leadership and lawmakers involved in the House Intelligence and Homeland Security committees, inserted themselves into the NYPD spying program debate by criticizing Mayor Michael Bloomberg for his “underhanded and unprofessional” response to criticism of the spying program and calling for an end to the NYPD’s out-of-state spying on Islamic communities.

The mayor has repeatedly defended his department’s actions as lawful and necessary to keep New York safe and he and his administration have brushed off concerns, raised by lawmakers and civil rights groups, that the NYPD’s activities are constitutionally suspect.

And while many New Yorkers may often not agree with the Bloomberg administration on various issues, when it comes to safety and security the mayor has earned extraordinarily high marks.

Pragmatic citizens understand that the strategies employed by the NYPD are appropriate given the grave terrorist threats leveled against New York City and its residents. Moreover, with respect to more mundane day-to-day criminal activity, statistics confirm that the city continues to maintain impressive crime reduction numbers in most major categories.

It is reasonable to sympathize with the law-abiding members of the Muslim community who must endure the endless questions and increased scrutiny that have come their way since 9/11. The results, though, speak for themselves. Fact is, New York continues to be the world’s premier terrorist target and the very police officers who are so often criticized have crafted a perfect record in thwarting numerous terror plots hatched against the city since that terrible September morning more than 10 years ago.

Most of those major accomplishments are the result of an aggressive strategy of prevention, employed by a fair but unrelenting police commissioner, with the support of the mayor’s office.

Though it’s hard to blame anybody for feeling unfairly targeted, New Yorkers of all backgrounds must accept the dreadful reality of living in a large metropolis filled with illegal weapons and plenty of bad guys ready and willing to use them, especially on police officers. If added scrutiny is what it takes to save lives, then the police are welcome to stop and frisk me too. New York has come too far to regress to the pre-Giuliani days of rampant lawlessness and widespread fear.

Ray Kelly has earned the benefit of the doubt. Sensible people of all faiths and cultures, especially those of us in the Jewish community, should be thankful and deeply appreciative to the police commissioner and the thousands of heroic officers of the NYPD who daily risk their lives to protect us.

We’re Fortunate To Have Ray Kelly As Police Commissioner

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012

In July 1993, I joined a group of Jewish leaders on a visit to Israel with then-Mayor David N. Dinkins. One morning as we had breakfast at the King David Hotel terrace overlooking the Old City of Jerusalem, Dinkins confided, “I wish Ray Kelly were in charge before Crown Heights blew up.” By this time, Ray Kelly had become police commissioner and had made a clear impact on the mayor.

I thought of the moment when Ray Kelly was chosen by Mayor Michael Bloomberg to reassume leadership of the NYPD not long after 9/11. Whenever there is talk of possible terrorist attacks against New York City, I look at my family, friends and neighbors and feel fortunate that the city’s security is in Commissioner Kelly’s hands (and the hands of the superb people he surrounds himself with).

When I or any member of my family is out late at night, there is a sense of ease because of the way crime has been diminished even further by the NYPD under Kelly.

Whenever there is a perceived threat, I can see the increased security at synagogues and identifiably Jewish locations. Terrorists have made it clear that Jews are significant targets for them. However, if Jews were suspected of being terrorists, I would hope the law enforcement community would be leaving no stone unturned – including surveillance at my synagogue – to get to the threats.

It is for these reasons that I cannot comprehend the recent uproar over a video that actually states at its beginning that it is only a “minority of Muslims” who are suspected of terrorism.

Commissioner Kelly has apologized for appearing in the video. Possibly he felt he had to do so to maintain continued positive relations with Muslim communities, but his upstanding record for a decade should have been enough. Mayor Bloomberg and his police commissioner have been extraordinarily gracious and effective in their outreach to the Muslim community.

And now, in addition to the ongoing concerns about lone wolf terrorists, we learn of Iran’s (and Hizbullah’s and Hamas’s) threats to strike at America and the Zionists (read Jews). Intelligence reports from Washington, D.C. law enforcement confirms that those threats center on areas with significant Jewish populations.

New York City is in the cross hairs of these types of threats. Fortunately, our police commissioner is laser-focused on preventing any attacks. His staff is thoroughly prepared – but imagine if, God forbid, an attack succeeded because somehow the politically correct among us forced the NYPD to decrease its levels of surveillance.

I am disappointed at the speed with which some have forgotten the daily risks that are taken to protect all New Yorkers. Police officers today would rush into danger, as they did on September 11th, 2001, while ensuring the safety of all others. Commissioner Kelly and his department are known to be especially sensitive about religion and ethnicity. I have seen clergy meetings with all faiths take place at One Police Plaza and this commissioner’s outreach to all communities is second to none.

I believe only a small minority of Muslims oppose the NYPD on this because the majority want their families to be protected and all recognize that even one terrible terrorist incident would lead to conditions that might include ethnic profiling or worse. The best protection against that is for the police department to be allowed to do its job.

While I agree that civil liberties must be protected, it is outrageous to suggest that the practices of the NYPD have in any serious way threatened that goal. Tragically, there are some who protested the killing of Osama bin Laden. Not surprisingly, some are now leading the attempt to tie the hands of law enforcement and particularly the NYPD during this dangerous time.

All people of good will – Christians, Muslims, Hindus, Buddhists, Jews, non-believers – need to rally around Commissioner Kelly and other law enforcement leaders to keep each other and our city safe.

William E. Rapfogel is CEO of the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty. He has led other Jewish organizations and served in the administration of Mayor Edward I. Koch and with Comptroller Harrison J. Goldin.

Mayor Bloomberg Links Surveillance to Jewish-School Shooting in France

Tuesday, March 20th, 2012

At a press conference Monday evening, Mayor Michael Bloomberg offered a sympathetic reaction to reports that a gunman killed four people at a Jewish school in France, and linked it with the NYPD’s out-of-state surveillance efforts, Capital New York reports.

“It’s easy to sit here and say New York City should just take care of New York City,” he said. “We are taking care of New York City by having police officers around the world and we’re gonna continue to do that and keep us all safe.”

After prodding by a reporter from the Village Voice, referring to arrests made by NYPD officers of Occupy Wall Street demonstrators, Bloomberg said the police “keep us safe, and next time you walk by a police officer, say Thank you, Sir, because your right to ask this question is protected by that man or woman.”

Monday morning, 110 groups including civil liberties and Muslim advocacy groups asked Attorney General Eric Holder for a justice department investigation of the NYPD’s surveillance program of Muslim individuals and institutions.

“We are in compliance with all the laws as far as we can tell,” Bloomberg responded, adding that “everybody’s got a right to write a letter.” He said polling showed people approved of the practice.

“Overwhelmingly, people say yes,” he said. “Now that doesn’t make it right, but does it mean that a hundred small institutions writing a letter is indicative of what most organizations think or what most organizations would like to do?”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/mayor-bloomberg-links-surveillance-to-jewish-school-shooting-in-france/2012/03/20/

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