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Posts Tagged ‘Pages’

Community Currents – July 13, 2012

Wednesday, July 11th, 2012

071312 Comm Pages

The Yellow Star

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

A little more than six months ago, my sister-in-law passed away after battling a serious illness. For more than 30 years she had given symposiums on the Holocaust to youngsters in the Philadelphia area, and we talked about her activities many times on our visits to the U.S. After her passing I was determined to do some kind of volunteer work for Yad Vashem in her memory.

I contacted a wonderful person there who works on the Names Project, recovering names of victims that have yet to be placed in the database. Believe it or not, there are still nearly two million names that are not on the list – millions of wonderful people who lived, worked, studied and raised families in cities, shtetls and villages who must not be forgotten. Many of the survivors or family members are elderly, or their memories have been clouded by the passage of many decades. And so the saying “if not now, when then?” is never more applicable.

After my initial meeting with Sara Berkowits, my contact at Yad Vashem, I received some training from another field worker who is also recovering names through interviews, visits to shuls, etc. He gave me the names of survivors to be interviewed in order to reclaim these missing names. Although excited about the opportunity, I was nervous about how to do the job properly, how much the survivors would actually remember, and if they would even allow me to come into their lives and homes. What I was not prepared for was how wonderful and eye opening the experience – every discussion actually – was going to be.

The very first interview I conducted was with an elderly man born in Romania. My friend, Rafi Freudenberger, and I listened intently to his stories (there is another department at Yad Vashem that records personal stories, but we were interested to hear about their families in order to get to the actual names), and heard the names of Transnistria and Bukovina. I asked him to repeat these names many times, having never heard such names before. Oddly enough, in the weeks following that first interview, I came across many articles that mentioned those same places, and the tragedies that befell the Jewish communities there. Many thousands of Jews were caught between the claws of Russia, Romania, and Germany. In October 1941 the entire Jewish community was deported en masse to Siberia.

As Mr. Geller was elderly, I limited the time we spent at his home sorting out the families and the names he recalled. I scheduled a second meeting with him for the following week. But after speaking to his wife the day before I was to return, it became clear that the process of remembering was just too much for him. I would have to give to Yad Vashem only the few names that I had gathered.

Recently, I spoke to another survivor who was born in Den Haag in Amsterdam. Shlomo first gave us a detailed list of family members who had perished in the Shoah – where they were born; where and when they died. He showed us a detailed list from the government of Holland that had all the information, and he wanted to correct some erroneous details that Yad Vashem had listed. At one point he opened up a drawer with documents and pictures. One of the pictures was that of a family wedding, and every person was wearing a yellow star – a badge of honor and pride. Unfortunately most of the people were killed in the Shoah, including his parents.

At one point I asked Shlomo about the bookcase and the very old-looking volumes. He told me that the non-Jews had taken these and many other volumes from his father and grandfather’s homes. The ones I was looking at were the “survivors.” The others had been taken, their bindings sold and the precious pages destroyed.

Shlomo’s story of his family was also the story of a very special cousin who went through Bergen-Belsen and Trobitz with him. (Of the 2,500 prisoners who were transported from Bergen-Belsen on April 10, 1945, 600 died from disease or malnutrition.) Both lost most of their family members there. Joe Holstein, my wife’s cousin, lost his parents and one brother in Bergen-Belsen, and lost another brother in Trobitz. One of his five sons was named after his two brothers. Shlomo’s parents died only a few weeks before the end of the war, and he has not gone back since. But cousin Joe and his wife returned to visit the graves at Trobitz, and took pictures of Shlomo’s relatives’ gravestones as well.

Joe raised six wonderful children, but died of a heart attack at the sound of the first siren of the first Gulf War. Like Yosef of biblical fame, Joe had also been a yoetz (Joe was a school guidance counselor). And during the year that my wife and I met, he advised us on many different matters. Twenty-one years later Joe has many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Each of them is testimony to the fact that am Yisrael chai – the Jewish people are alive and thriving in the Holy Land.

Teacher, Love Your Student: It Takes More Than Chapters, Pages and Lessons

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012

A young teacher described this episode that occurred early in her teaching career:

“One beautiful spring morning when I arrived at school, I was surprised to see a youngster waiting at the door. ‘It’s locked,’ he said sadly. His expression brightened as I began to fumble for my keys. ‘You’re a teacher!” he exclaimed in obvious delight.

“As I slipped the key into the lock and opened the door, I looked at him and smiled. ‘What makes you think that?’ I asked him, amused and pleased in no small measure by his reaction.

“He looked directly into my eye and spoke softly but with respect. ‘You have the key.’ “I was both humbled and overwhelmed at the magnitude of his simple observation, by the implication it carried, and the responsibility I bore simply by possessing ‘the key.’ Without question, this young student’s comment to me was among the most significant of my entire teaching career. Not a day went by when, upon arriving at school, I did not recall it.”

Rav Yosef Dov Soloveitchik taught that “teaching involves more than the transmission of knowledge and understanding. It requires empathy between teacher and student, and a sharing of feelings, thought and motives. There is an interaction of personalities, an exchange of values and insights.” To teach is to know how to unlock not only the mind, but the heart, feeling and interest of every student as well. There is no master key. “What we require is the warm embrace as much as the brilliant idea; sympathetic understanding, true befriending, and a human reaching out: a suggestion that we care; the teaching role is inadequate.”

We need the key.

Is there a standardized lesson plan from which we can derive instruction as to how to transmit more than just the data, the uninspired information of our subject to our students?

Listen to The Master Teacher Himself – God – teaching a lesson to his star pupil, Moshe. The lesson’s goal was to convey the specifics of charity – terumah – needed for erecting God’s sanctuary.

The lesson begins with general instructions. “Speak to the children of Israel, that they may take unto Me an offering,” and then moves on to details of implementation. The terumah, Moshe is told, may be offered from gold, silver, copper, skins, wood, oils and stones.”

Facts. Knowledge. Information. These are, of course, necessary but not nearly sufficient for the Teacher who wants to not only teach but uplift and inspire. God adds to these basic instructions feeling and emotion: “Veasu li mikdash veshachanti betocham – and let them make Me a sanctuary, that I may dwell in their midst.”

It is in these words that we are given insight into the true art of teaching.

The Kotzker notes that God does not say He will dwell in His midst but rather “in their midst.”

The real lesson is very clearly not about facts and figures but charity. As such, its greatest value and greatest lesson is in character development. Each individual must have ample room and easy access within his being for God to enter and remain as a permanent resident, betocham mamash.

Ultimately, all good and effective teaching must arouse pleasant feelings and responses. This is a lesson all teachers must remember when they teach. It is the responsibility of the teacher to teach in a way that arouses positive feelings. It is not, as too many teachers presume, the student’s responsibility to create within himself such feelings.

By showing our students respect and love, as God showed Moshe, we invite our students into the wonder, awe and power of what we teach. And even if our students do not always grasp the “whys and the wherefores” they should always come away from our lessons knowing that they are worthy and cherished.

In his words to Moshe, God carefully instructs that the Mikdash be constructed li – for Me. But of course! What other reason might there be in constructing a Mikdash if not for the sharing of God’s spirit and knowledge?

Rashi comments: “Let them make to the glory of My name a place of holiness.” Success in imparting Torah knowledge can only be measured by the ultimate affect the learning has on the total being of the student. If a student’s actions, thoughts and responses are Mikdash-like, the educational process is successful. That is, the student must learn the stuff of the lesson but unless he or she does so in a context of respect and honor, it is only half a lesson.

The full lesson only happens when mechanchim – educational producers – understand that the for Me aspect of Mikdash requires that knowledge be delivered not only to the head but also to the heart, that the lesson taught must ultimately touch the student’s heart and emotion. Such a lesson can only be taught by a living and caring teacher. A creative curriculum is not enough.

Title: Soul to Soul – Writings from Dark Places

Wednesday, August 17th, 2011

Title: Soul to Soul - Writings from Dark Places


Author: Deborah Masel


Publisher: Gefen


Reviewed by Yocheved Golani

 

 


   Every medical school in the world should have this book on the syllabus: once during first-year medical studies and again at residency. Pages 63-67 pretty much sum up the brutality of a given medical staff member’s offhand remarks and intentional insensitivity in the presence of patients. They crush the spirits of otherwise valiant people struggling to live. Med students who assume superiority to their needy patients need not have airs. They’re not G-d and not about to become His rival, either. Medical interventions have limits. And condescension kills people as much as disease can.

 

   Deborah Masel’s account of her years-long battle with metastatic breast cancer is a nightmare many women in industrialized countries fear. An experienced writer before she authored Soul to Soul, Masel’s prose is without pretense, raw and human. The 184-page paperback describes the suspense, fear and lack of control over the intimate details of a woman whose life is complicated by breast cancer that spread throughout her body. The light shining from this story is in the lessons that the author learned from the Aish Kodesh by the rebbe of Piacezna.

 

   Aish Kodesh is the soul-searching spiritual survival effort to persevere as an emunah-oriented Jew that was written during the Shoah. Its overriding lesson is to believe – while we shudder – that G-d, despite fearsome facts and logic, is beyond any boundaries and above all nature. That G-d will save us is a given in Torah life and in Aish Kodesh. How He will do so is another matter altogether. We as Jews must allow the possible to happen, not reject outcomes that do not match our fantasies.

 

   Masel tells us on page 170 that she clung to G-d despite the chaotic world of her treatments, pain and emotional vicissitudes. She learned from the rebbe of Piacezna that “G-d is right there with me in the foxhole … the longer I stayed with him, the more this [emotional vicissitudes] barrier dissolved.”

 

   Devorah Masel died shortly after her book was released. Hear her plea in chapter one: “Please don’t stop reading. I know it’s scary. I’m scared too. Once I too would have closed the book. I wouldn’t want to know about it. Life’s scary enough, I’d say, without this. But now I’m stuck with it and I’m asking you not to shut me out.”

 

   Yocheved Golani is the author of E-book “It’s MY Crisis! And I’ll Cry If I Need To: EMPOWER Yourself to Cope with a Medical Challenge”  (http://booklocker.com/books/3067.html).

Title: A Taste of Challah: A Complete Guide to Challah and Bread Baking

Wednesday, October 10th, 2007


Title: A Taste of Challah: A Complete Guide to Challah and Bread Baking

Author: Tamar Ansh
Publisher: Feldheim

 

         Bubby’s Bobka never knew that it would become an international star. Now it is, thanks to Tamar Ansh and Feldheim Publishers.

 

         The eye-catching cover of this easily held book compels you to open the pages and coo over the cleverly photographed processes of preparing each recipe inside. The framework of an authentic Jewish life is explained as the pages unfold, with explanations and blessings to guide you through baking day and all the days of your life. Treat the book with utmost respect as the Hebrew name of G‑d appears in it several times. You can also salute the author for including time-tested tips for setting up your workspace and creating perfect recipes.

 

         You want a No-Pocket Pita or a Yemenite Saluf with a roasted top, perfect for chilbeh and schug? No problem! The recipes for the spicy dips appear on the very next page. And if you need something milder for your tender tummy, see the Cinnabon Cinnamon Rolls instructions nearby. Eat your hearts out, bakery owners. This is one can-do cookbook for beginners and experienced kitchen mavens.

 

         Rabbis, rest assured that all will go well. Pages 190-199 teach the readers how to separate challah and explain the halachic ramifications of hafrashat challah.

 

         Olim from non-metric countries will surely treasure the metric and other conversion charts at the back of the book. Life in Israel is measured somewhat differently, as are recipes in the Holy Land.

 

         Add this essential ingredient to your kitchen today.A Taste of Challah: A Complete Guide to Challah and Bread Baking is a must-have item. Give it to your local bride-to-be and get one for her mother, too.

 

 


Yocheved Golani is the author of It’s MY Crisis! And I’ll Cry If I Need To: A Life Book for Helping You to Dry Your Tears and Cope With a Medical Challenge (Booklocker Publishing).

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/title-a-taste-of-challah-a-complete-guide-to-challah-and-bread-baking/2007/10/10/

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