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July 1, 2016 / 25 Sivan, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘paint’

Neo-Nazi Vandalism in Sderot

Monday, September 15th, 2014

Israel Police have arrested three teens in connection with anti-Semitic vandalism involving destruction of property in the southern Israeli city of Sderot.

The gang painted green swastikas and slathered dripping red Satanic symbols on cars in the city, where residents have already been traumatized by years of incessant rocket fire from Gaza.

Police officials said in a post on the Twitter social networking site Monday morning the three suspects confessed to their connection with the attacks under questioning during the investigation.

No information was released about the identity of the suspects.

Hana Levi Julian

Arabs Trying to Cause Car Accidents Near Efrat

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

Arab youths near Efrat have been escalating their attacks against Jewish motorists driving down the main highway near Efrat.

For the second day in a row, Arab youths have been throwing stones at cars driving down Highway 60, near the northern entrance to the town.

Earlier today, the Arabs escalated their attacks and also tried to throw paint at the windshield of a passing car.

Army and police have belatedly arrived at the scene of of the repeated attacks, but at least one passing driver, who was nearly stoned, stopped and chased the youths away from the highway, saving lives.

In the past month, Arabs have thrown burning tires at passing cars, and stoned vehicles near the Efrat northern Entrance.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Killed for Complaining About Graffiti

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

Caught this: At Prince of Peace, worshiper dies trying to stop tagger 

…a parishioner checking on the food being set up in the parking lot saw something suspicious. A young woman was spraying graffiti on a church wall. When he asked her to stop, she knocked him to the ground…a man emerged from a nearby car and opened fire, killing Ordonez and wounding the other parishioner…recently gang members had threatened violence against residents who complain about or paint over graffiti…LAPD detectives are searching for the gunman and tagger but believe some witnesses are afraid to come forward out of concern about gang reprisals. Several witnesses talked to The LA Times only on the condition of anonymity, fearing for their safety.

Searching, I found this:

Some of the most common styles of graffiti have their own names. A “tag” is the most basic writing of an artist’s name, it is simply a handstyle. A graffiti writer’s tag is his or her personalized signature. Tagging is often the example given when opponents of graffiti refer to any acts of handstyle graffiti writing (it is by far the most common form of graffiti). Tags can contain subtle and sometimes cryptic messages, and might incorporate the artist’s crew initials or other letters.

And this:

Tagging 1. (VERB) THE ACT of performing simple graffiti using spray-paint (usually cheap) and stencils. Done quickly, usually in seconds. Usually during the day.

For this you shoot to kill?

Visit My Right Word.

Yisrael Medad

Egyptian Reporter Defaces Subway ‘Anti-Savage’ Ad, Sprays an Opponent, Gets Arrested (Video)

Friday, September 28th, 2012

Mona Eltahawy is an extremely well-spoken, Egyptian-American journalist who has become the g0-to speaker for comments on the Middle East in general, and on Egypt and Women’s issues in particular.  A speaker who stays on message no matter what is being asked, Eltahawy’s theme is: former Egyptian President Hosnai Mubarak and those who supported him are always bad, Muslims seeking to control their own destiny are always good and should be supported in the name of freedom and democracy, no matter how reprehensible their actions. Over the past few years Eltahawy has regularly been represented as an expert on such media outlets as CNN, the Guardian (UK), The New York Times and the Washington Post.

Eltahawy was arrested Wednesday evening, September 26, in a New York City subway station because she insisted free speech included her right to deface an ad espousing a message with which she disagreed – Pamela Geller’s anti-Jihad ad discussed and shown here.  She also insisted her free speech right extended to spraying toxic paint on a woman, Pamela Hall, who tried to interfere with Eltahawy’s efforts to deface Geller’s ad.  And then Eltahawy blamed Hall for interfering with her free speech rights and accused the arresting police officers of interfering with her “non-violent” protest, thereby engaging in anti-democratic activity.

It appears Eltahawy has a singularly self-focused understanding of freedom and democracy.  Given her limitations, it is problematic that so many media outlets rely on Eltahawy as an “expert.”  It is possible that given her criminal activity Wednesday evening, some will see her convoluted views of reality as casting doubts on past Eltahawy discourses.

The journalist’s inability to recognize why her activity was criminal and subverted the First Amendment, simply because Geller’s anti-Jihad ad constituted speech with which she didn’t agree, is telling.

But this isn’t the first time Eltahawy’s view of reality has been refracted through her own, narrow prism.

Eltahawy is best known for being an ardent activist for women’s rights, a dangerous and valiant effort for a Muslim.  She has written about the enormously high percentage of women who have been sexually assaulted in Egypt, as many as 80 percent, and that four out of five Egyptian women have reported being sexually assaulted.

Although Eltahawy has been highly critical and very vocal about the subjugation of women under Islam, when that view bumps up against her global recognition as an articulate spokesperson for the revolutionary Arab Spring, a disconnect takes place.

In the context of the anti-Jihad ads which she defaced, Eltahawy expressed outrage over the use of the term “savage,” to describe Jihadi activity.  In her view, the use of the word savage was an insult because she interpreted it to refer to all Muslims.  While defacing the ad, she told Hall, who tried to prevent the ad from being damaged, that she was protesting racism, and that Hall was defending racism.

But Eltahawy described Muslims who sexually assaulted and beat her last winter as a “pack of wild animals.”  So, was her anger over the use of the term savage, when she described wild, violent Muslims as “wild animals” hypocritical?  Not necessarily, because her criticism of the Egyptian police is consistent with her world view.  There were numerous reports of women assaulted by the civilian crowds, the revolutionaries, in Tahrir Square, during the Arab spring.  And it is in commenting on those assaults that Eltahawy’s hypocrisy is made clear.

Perhaps the best known, to western audiences, of sexual assaults by the Arab spring activists, is the assault on CBS’s Lara Logan.  Logan was brutally physically and sexually assaulted by those demonstrating in Tahrir Square crowds in February, 2011.

When Eltahawy was asked to comment on CTV News on the attacks on Logan, she “unequivocally condemned” the violence experienced by Logan.  However, the focus of her ire was always pointed back at the Mubarak regime, which was, she said, “known for targetting women.”

Eltahawy even went so far as to insinuate that Logan’s story was in some ways questionable, or at least an anomaly.  She also deflected the responsibility for the attack on unnamed others.

“Women I know said it was the safest area in Cairo,” Eltahawy said of Tahrir Square during the demonstrations.  But after Mubarak, the area was “open to all, so we don’t know who else was there.”

Pamela Hall is pressing charges against Eltahawy.  Her clothing and her bags were damaged by the paint.  When reached by The Jewish Press, Hall said she knew who Eltahawy was as soon as she saw her, but she was “surprised” to see her spray painting the ad.

According to Hall, using “paint is a much more serious act than slapping a sticker up and walking away.  What was she thinking?”

Lori Lowenthal Marcus

Chabad of Westport Hoping for Town Approval at Long Last

Friday, June 15th, 2012

According to the Westport Daily Voice, the structure that used to house the Three Bears Restaurant in Westport, CT, will shortly officially become the new home of Chabad Lubavitch of Westport, which has been operating without approval out of the space since January.

On Thursday night, an attorney for Chabad appeared before the town’s Planning and Zoning Commission, seeking a change of use from restaurant to religious institution, as well as approval of interior renovations.

“We are planning modest renovations,” Weisman said. “We’re not doing anything to the outside of the building. We may paint it, we may do some cosmetic work, but it will look exactly as it does today.”

The building will be divided into a sanctuary, three classrooms, and office space.

Five months ago, Chabad was cited by the Planning and Zoning Department for occupying the building without a special permit.

The citation was issued after a complaint from a neighbor.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Let Kids Be Kids

Monday, June 4th, 2012

Dear Dr. Yael:

I now see why so many children are insecure.

I have been a day-care provider for many years. When parents initially consider day care they want a small group so their children will not be neglected. But problems arise when their children turn two, and nursery or playgroup becomes an option. All of a sudden a group of 20-25 children is not a problem because it is much cheaper. I refer to two-two and a half year olds, whose parents feel that they need to exclusively be with children their own age.

These children nap for a good two hours; being in a disciplined environment is not really a must at this age. I have witnessed many playgroup settings where “let’s go, you have to come with us,” or “you have to… etc.” are the prevalent phrases.

Here’s my question: Why can’t these children enjoy being toddlers? In daycare we play, read stories, paint, etc. But if a child does not want to join and would rather play with his cars or trains, what’s the harm? I respect and welcome your opinion.

Morah Deena

Note to readers: The following reply was written by Dr. Orit Respler-Herman, a child psychologist:

Dear Morah Deena:

Younger children definitely need more attention than older ones and, while it is good to teach children, as they get older, to be more independent, two-year-olds are definitely too young to advocate for themselves when they are in group of 20-25 other children. Of course every child is different, some being more mature than others. However, a study completed by two Harvard Medical School researchers, Michael L. Commons and Patrice M. Miller, found that America’s “let them cry” attitude toward children can lead to more fears and insecurities among adults.

The researchers further found that physical contact and reassurance will make children more secure and better able to form adult relationships when they finally make their own way in life. Many playgroups are aware that children need much love and attention, and ensure that they receive an abundance of it. But some nurseries have too many children and thus cannot guarantee that the children’s emotional needs are being met. These places should certainly be avoided, even if they have a monetary lure.

The money that will be saved by sending your precious children to a place that may not feed their emotional requirements will surely be used later on in life to help him or her regain self-esteem. To build up that self-esteem now, it is imperative that you give your children your time and love when they are with you. And when they’re in school, it is also very important to ensure that they receive love and attention in order to feel secure in your absence.

Self-esteem is one of the greatest gifts parents can give their children. When children feel secure, they can make better life choices regarding friends, schoolwork, and eventually a spouse. Conversely, insecure children often have various social and academic problems that can permeate their lives. If parents try hard to imbue their children with self-esteem, why would they allow them to be neglected in school?

As children mature and gain more independence, they are expected to function in a classroom with 20-25 children. While all children surely benefit from some one-on-one attention, it is important that they learn to become more independent and to wait for their needs to be met.

As with everything else, children need a balance between attention and independence. They need us to fill their lives with love and positive energy, but as they grow older they also need to learn that they are not the center of everyone’s universe and that they will sometimes have to wait for their needs to be met. This is why we usually encourage parents to give children some sort of pre-school experience. In addition to the excellent social skills that children learn from attending school, they also learn how to function within a group setting along with the basic give-and-take of a micro-society.

Thus I agree that younger children (i.e. 2-3 year olds) benefit from a smaller-size daycare or playgroup surrounding. It would be ideal for a parent to find a small playgroup (5-7 children) with a morah that is loving and laid back. It is beneficial for all children, whatever the age, to have structure. At the same time, young children need the freedom to follow their own will – within certain parameters.

Dr. Yael Respler

Attacks on Jewish Maale HaZeitim Continue, Jerusalem Fire Dept. Slow to Respond

Monday, May 14th, 2012

Despite the arrest of a local Arab man for repeat Molotov cocktail attacks on the eastern Jerusalem Jewish neighborhood of  Maale HaZeitim, assaults on the residential area just across from the Old City of Jerusalem continue, with two offenses occurring in the last 72 hours.

On Friday night, as residents of  Maale HaZeitim gathered in their synagogue to commemorate the Sabbath, a series of fireworks were aimed and fired at the buildings, exploding loudly and catching grass on the perimeter of the neighborhood on fire.

After a quick consultation with the synagogue’s rabbi to determine the permissibility of calling the fire department to extinguish the flames on Shabbat, a resident dialed the emergency number for Jerusalem’s fire department.  According to the resident who placed the call, no one answered the service number.  Hanging up and trying again thereafter, the phone was answered immediately by a fire department representative, who sent a fire truck to the scene.

Residents of Maale HaZeitim told the Jewish Press that the fire truck took approximately 15 minutes to arrive.  By then, the fire had consumed the perimeter grass and extinguished itself.  Fire fighters surveyed the scene, made a report, and left the neighborhood.  The perpetrator has not been apprehended.

The Friday night attack was followed by one in the afternoon on Sunday, on the opposite side of the community.  According to reports by residents of one of the buildings, a bottle of brown oil-based paint was hurled at the homes around 3:30pm, the 20th such attack in the last few months.  The balcony of an  empty apartment in Maale HaZeitim’s “Building 5” shows splatterings of multiple colors of paint accumulated over the course of several attacks, as well as shards of broken glass from the bottles in which the paint was poured.

Though Maale HaZeitim is under the protection of the Jerusalem Police department like all other Jerusalem neighborhoods, the city also employs a special guard service to provide protection onsite 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  Despite this, attacks against the community continue, with residents expressing concern that the guards do not respond quickly to attacks.  One resident told the Jewish Press that a guard apologized to her for failing to respond to a firebomb  attack on her apartment because he had concentrated on studying for his college entrance exams and simply failed to see the assault take place.  Other residents stated that guards are afraid to respond to attacks, for fear of being incriminated by police, treated unjustly in the judicial system,  and serving time in jail for defending Jewish residents.

A Jerusalem police officer, on condition of anonymity, told the Jewish Press that guards often fail to alert local law enforcement immediately when an attack occurs, weakening the potential for a successful police response.  However, on April 30, a coordinated effort by the police, border police, and the local guards resulted in the apprehension of a man who admitted to conducting multiple firebomb attacks on the community.

Maale HaZeitim mothers have expressed concern and outrage that many of their small children have grown fearful of Arabs as a result of recent attacks, and demanded protection from the city and state, as afforded to them by right as citizens of Israel and Jerusalem.

Malkah Fleisher

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/attacks-on-jewish-maale-hazeitim-continue-jerusalem-fire-department-slow-to-respond/2012/05/14/

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