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Posts Tagged ‘paint’

Killed for Complaining About Graffiti

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

Caught this: At Prince of Peace, worshiper dies trying to stop tagger 

…a parishioner checking on the food being set up in the parking lot saw something suspicious. A young woman was spraying graffiti on a church wall. When he asked her to stop, she knocked him to the ground…a man emerged from a nearby car and opened fire, killing Ordonez and wounding the other parishioner…recently gang members had threatened violence against residents who complain about or paint over graffiti…LAPD detectives are searching for the gunman and tagger but believe some witnesses are afraid to come forward out of concern about gang reprisals. Several witnesses talked to The LA Times only on the condition of anonymity, fearing for their safety.

Searching, I found this:

Some of the most common styles of graffiti have their own names. A “tag” is the most basic writing of an artist’s name, it is simply a handstyle. A graffiti writer’s tag is his or her personalized signature. Tagging is often the example given when opponents of graffiti refer to any acts of handstyle graffiti writing (it is by far the most common form of graffiti). Tags can contain subtle and sometimes cryptic messages, and might incorporate the artist’s crew initials or other letters.

And this:

Tagging 1. (VERB) THE ACT of performing simple graffiti using spray-paint (usually cheap) and stencils. Done quickly, usually in seconds. Usually during the day.

For this you shoot to kill?

Visit My Right Word.

Egyptian Reporter Defaces Subway ‘Anti-Savage’ Ad, Sprays an Opponent, Gets Arrested (Video)

Friday, September 28th, 2012

Mona Eltahawy is an extremely well-spoken, Egyptian-American journalist who has become the g0-to speaker for comments on the Middle East in general, and on Egypt and Women’s issues in particular.  A speaker who stays on message no matter what is being asked, Eltahawy’s theme is: former Egyptian President Hosnai Mubarak and those who supported him are always bad, Muslims seeking to control their own destiny are always good and should be supported in the name of freedom and democracy, no matter how reprehensible their actions. Over the past few years Eltahawy has regularly been represented as an expert on such media outlets as CNN, the Guardian (UK), The New York Times and the Washington Post.

Eltahawy was arrested Wednesday evening, September 26, in a New York City subway station because she insisted free speech included her right to deface an ad espousing a message with which she disagreed – Pamela Geller’s anti-Jihad ad discussed and shown here.  She also insisted her free speech right extended to spraying toxic paint on a woman, Pamela Hall, who tried to interfere with Eltahawy’s efforts to deface Geller’s ad.  And then Eltahawy blamed Hall for interfering with her free speech rights and accused the arresting police officers of interfering with her “non-violent” protest, thereby engaging in anti-democratic activity.

It appears Eltahawy has a singularly self-focused understanding of freedom and democracy.  Given her limitations, it is problematic that so many media outlets rely on Eltahawy as an “expert.”  It is possible that given her criminal activity Wednesday evening, some will see her convoluted views of reality as casting doubts on past Eltahawy discourses.

The journalist’s inability to recognize why her activity was criminal and subverted the First Amendment, simply because Geller’s anti-Jihad ad constituted speech with which she didn’t agree, is telling.

But this isn’t the first time Eltahawy’s view of reality has been refracted through her own, narrow prism.

Eltahawy is best known for being an ardent activist for women’s rights, a dangerous and valiant effort for a Muslim.  She has written about the enormously high percentage of women who have been sexually assaulted in Egypt, as many as 80 percent, and that four out of five Egyptian women have reported being sexually assaulted.

Although Eltahawy has been highly critical and very vocal about the subjugation of women under Islam, when that view bumps up against her global recognition as an articulate spokesperson for the revolutionary Arab Spring, a disconnect takes place.

In the context of the anti-Jihad ads which she defaced, Eltahawy expressed outrage over the use of the term “savage,” to describe Jihadi activity.  In her view, the use of the word savage was an insult because she interpreted it to refer to all Muslims.  While defacing the ad, she told Hall, who tried to prevent the ad from being damaged, that she was protesting racism, and that Hall was defending racism.

But Eltahawy described Muslims who sexually assaulted and beat her last winter as a “pack of wild animals.”  So, was her anger over the use of the term savage, when she described wild, violent Muslims as “wild animals” hypocritical?  Not necessarily, because her criticism of the Egyptian police is consistent with her world view.  There were numerous reports of women assaulted by the civilian crowds, the revolutionaries, in Tahrir Square, during the Arab spring.  And it is in commenting on those assaults that Eltahawy’s hypocrisy is made clear.

Perhaps the best known, to western audiences, of sexual assaults by the Arab spring activists, is the assault on CBS’s Lara Logan.  Logan was brutally physically and sexually assaulted by those demonstrating in Tahrir Square crowds in February, 2011.

When Eltahawy was asked to comment on CTV News on the attacks on Logan, she “unequivocally condemned” the violence experienced by Logan.  However, the focus of her ire was always pointed back at the Mubarak regime, which was, she said, “known for targetting women.”

Eltahawy even went so far as to insinuate that Logan’s story was in some ways questionable, or at least an anomaly.  She also deflected the responsibility for the attack on unnamed others.

“Women I know said it was the safest area in Cairo,” Eltahawy said of Tahrir Square during the demonstrations.  But after Mubarak, the area was “open to all, so we don’t know who else was there.”

Pamela Hall is pressing charges against Eltahawy.  Her clothing and her bags were damaged by the paint.  When reached by The Jewish Press, Hall said she knew who Eltahawy was as soon as she saw her, but she was “surprised” to see her spray painting the ad.

According to Hall, using “paint is a much more serious act than slapping a sticker up and walking away.  What was she thinking?”

Chabad of Westport Hoping for Town Approval at Long Last

Friday, June 15th, 2012

According to the Westport Daily Voice, the structure that used to house the Three Bears Restaurant in Westport, CT, will shortly officially become the new home of Chabad Lubavitch of Westport, which has been operating without approval out of the space since January.

On Thursday night, an attorney for Chabad appeared before the town’s Planning and Zoning Commission, seeking a change of use from restaurant to religious institution, as well as approval of interior renovations.

“We are planning modest renovations,” Weisman said. “We’re not doing anything to the outside of the building. We may paint it, we may do some cosmetic work, but it will look exactly as it does today.”

The building will be divided into a sanctuary, three classrooms, and office space.

Five months ago, Chabad was cited by the Planning and Zoning Department for occupying the building without a special permit.

The citation was issued after a complaint from a neighbor.

Let Kids Be Kids

Monday, June 4th, 2012

Dear Dr. Yael:

I now see why so many children are insecure.

I have been a day-care provider for many years. When parents initially consider day care they want a small group so their children will not be neglected. But problems arise when their children turn two, and nursery or playgroup becomes an option. All of a sudden a group of 20-25 children is not a problem because it is much cheaper. I refer to two-two and a half year olds, whose parents feel that they need to exclusively be with children their own age.

These children nap for a good two hours; being in a disciplined environment is not really a must at this age. I have witnessed many playgroup settings where “let’s go, you have to come with us,” or “you have to… etc.” are the prevalent phrases.

Here’s my question: Why can’t these children enjoy being toddlers? In daycare we play, read stories, paint, etc. But if a child does not want to join and would rather play with his cars or trains, what’s the harm? I respect and welcome your opinion.

Morah Deena

Note to readers: The following reply was written by Dr. Orit Respler-Herman, a child psychologist:

Dear Morah Deena:

Younger children definitely need more attention than older ones and, while it is good to teach children, as they get older, to be more independent, two-year-olds are definitely too young to advocate for themselves when they are in group of 20-25 other children. Of course every child is different, some being more mature than others. However, a study completed by two Harvard Medical School researchers, Michael L. Commons and Patrice M. Miller, found that America’s “let them cry” attitude toward children can lead to more fears and insecurities among adults.

The researchers further found that physical contact and reassurance will make children more secure and better able to form adult relationships when they finally make their own way in life. Many playgroups are aware that children need much love and attention, and ensure that they receive an abundance of it. But some nurseries have too many children and thus cannot guarantee that the children’s emotional needs are being met. These places should certainly be avoided, even if they have a monetary lure.

The money that will be saved by sending your precious children to a place that may not feed their emotional requirements will surely be used later on in life to help him or her regain self-esteem. To build up that self-esteem now, it is imperative that you give your children your time and love when they are with you. And when they’re in school, it is also very important to ensure that they receive love and attention in order to feel secure in your absence.

Self-esteem is one of the greatest gifts parents can give their children. When children feel secure, they can make better life choices regarding friends, schoolwork, and eventually a spouse. Conversely, insecure children often have various social and academic problems that can permeate their lives. If parents try hard to imbue their children with self-esteem, why would they allow them to be neglected in school?

As children mature and gain more independence, they are expected to function in a classroom with 20-25 children. While all children surely benefit from some one-on-one attention, it is important that they learn to become more independent and to wait for their needs to be met.

As with everything else, children need a balance between attention and independence. They need us to fill their lives with love and positive energy, but as they grow older they also need to learn that they are not the center of everyone’s universe and that they will sometimes have to wait for their needs to be met. This is why we usually encourage parents to give children some sort of pre-school experience. In addition to the excellent social skills that children learn from attending school, they also learn how to function within a group setting along with the basic give-and-take of a micro-society.

Thus I agree that younger children (i.e. 2-3 year olds) benefit from a smaller-size daycare or playgroup surrounding. It would be ideal for a parent to find a small playgroup (5-7 children) with a morah that is loving and laid back. It is beneficial for all children, whatever the age, to have structure. At the same time, young children need the freedom to follow their own will – within certain parameters.

Attacks on Jewish Maale HaZeitim Continue, Jerusalem Fire Dept. Slow to Respond

Monday, May 14th, 2012

Despite the arrest of a local Arab man for repeat Molotov cocktail attacks on the eastern Jerusalem Jewish neighborhood of  Maale HaZeitim, assaults on the residential area just across from the Old City of Jerusalem continue, with two offenses occurring in the last 72 hours.

On Friday night, as residents of  Maale HaZeitim gathered in their synagogue to commemorate the Sabbath, a series of fireworks were aimed and fired at the buildings, exploding loudly and catching grass on the perimeter of the neighborhood on fire.

After a quick consultation with the synagogue’s rabbi to determine the permissibility of calling the fire department to extinguish the flames on Shabbat, a resident dialed the emergency number for Jerusalem’s fire department.  According to the resident who placed the call, no one answered the service number.  Hanging up and trying again thereafter, the phone was answered immediately by a fire department representative, who sent a fire truck to the scene.

Residents of Maale HaZeitim told the Jewish Press that the fire truck took approximately 15 minutes to arrive.  By then, the fire had consumed the perimeter grass and extinguished itself.  Fire fighters surveyed the scene, made a report, and left the neighborhood.  The perpetrator has not been apprehended.

The Friday night attack was followed by one in the afternoon on Sunday, on the opposite side of the community.  According to reports by residents of one of the buildings, a bottle of brown oil-based paint was hurled at the homes around 3:30pm, the 20th such attack in the last few months.  The balcony of an  empty apartment in Maale HaZeitim’s “Building 5″ shows splatterings of multiple colors of paint accumulated over the course of several attacks, as well as shards of broken glass from the bottles in which the paint was poured.

Though Maale HaZeitim is under the protection of the Jerusalem Police department like all other Jerusalem neighborhoods, the city also employs a special guard service to provide protection onsite 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  Despite this, attacks against the community continue, with residents expressing concern that the guards do not respond quickly to attacks.  One resident told the Jewish Press that a guard apologized to her for failing to respond to a firebomb  attack on her apartment because he had concentrated on studying for his college entrance exams and simply failed to see the assault take place.  Other residents stated that guards are afraid to respond to attacks, for fear of being incriminated by police, treated unjustly in the judicial system,  and serving time in jail for defending Jewish residents.

A Jerusalem police officer, on condition of anonymity, told the Jewish Press that guards often fail to alert local law enforcement immediately when an attack occurs, weakening the potential for a successful police response.  However, on April 30, a coordinated effort by the police, border police, and the local guards resulted in the apprehension of a man who admitted to conducting multiple firebomb attacks on the community.

Maale HaZeitim mothers have expressed concern and outrage that many of their small children have grown fearful of Arabs as a result of recent attacks, and demanded protection from the city and state, as afforded to them by right as citizens of Israel and Jerusalem.

Before Color Photographs

Monday, March 26th, 2012

Horses and buggies? Gas lights on streets? Did my mother grow up in the Dark Ages of History? She told me about living in buildings without elevators, where no apartment had its own bathroom. Years later I decided it was like my college dorm in the 1950′s when I had to climb stairs to my room on the 4th floor, and a bathroom with showers was at the end of each floor’s hallway; no big deal. She informed me there were no washing machines, dryers, refrigerators with freezers, and gas stoves had to be lit with a match; this didn’t seem to affect me as I wasn’t doing laundry or grocery shopping and cooking; being a young girl, my mother was responsible for all of my needs.

My mother spoke of her girlhood apartments with coin-operated heating devices; was she cold in the winter, I wondered, suddenly listening to what she was saying! My dad bought space heaters for us to use during World War II, and I always grabbed it first for my bedroom and warmed up my clothes before putting them on for school. But I just plugged it in; no coins were necessary. She mentioned that there were no electric sewing machines and she hand-made most of our childhood dresses; she taught me to sew when I was about nine years old.

The author's father outside their family home

The daily life she was describing, even that coin-space-heater, seemed as far back as hoopskirts, and I’d only thought those gowns were gorgeous and never about the wearer being restricted. My mother didn’t appear old but she certainly had to be since she’d been living “before” so much. I tried to imagine her sleeping on a fire escape in the summer because the tiny apartment was too hot, sharing a bed with her sister, even the 4 flights of stairs she walked up and down just to get to the street or school, and really couldn’t. My childhood in a big house with my own bedroom, streetlights, cars, radios, 78-rpm recordings, was “modern,” and I tended to “see” my mother in my world and not one before I was ever born.

“Did you grow up in black and white?” my granddaughter, Elaina asked; we were looking at some photos. They were all black and white. When did color film come out, and be inexpensive enough to put a roll in a camera, I wondered but kept that to myself? The question was cleverly put. Was she being diplomatic about age, or merely observant that photos were shades of grey? If I were to tell any of my grandchildren about my “black and white” days, might I then seem as ancient as my own mother had been because of the “lack of?”

I quickly remembered some of my early childhood before houses/cars/offices were air-conditioned, when music records were heavy 78-rpm and only one could be played at a time. We had a weighty black telephone with a personal phone number of only a few digits, and a real operator generated long distance calls, microwaves were not even imagined. My early hosiery had seams and were made of silk. All my elementary school classes were held in one room (except sewing for girls and shop for boys), taught by a single female teacher, and the desks had inkwells for liquid ink. There were no ballpoint pens.

Well, I could tell Elaina that my parents got our first television set in May 1948, the screen was very tiny, and there were almost no programs on anyway. Nah. She’d laugh. Hmm. We had no cell phones, x-boxes, computers, fax machines, eye contact lenses, automatic garage door openers, frost free refrigerators, self-cleaning ovens, disposable items, riding lawn mowers, cars with navigation systems and keyless operation, our cotton clothing required heavy starching via a solution to soak the items in…my mind was remembering things as if turning a rolladex and bringing up file cards. Now a hand-held device with a tiny memory chip takes the place of file cards and calendars. I can make a phone call to Israel and get an instant connection, and, with a computer or tablet, have a video call.

“Elaina, color photography didn’t exist, and a black and white portrait was hand colored in transparent oil paint.” I smiled as I remembered when I personally learned this process, enjoyed both making plain into magical visual with paint, and there was not the fading I eventually had when color film came out for my camera and captured color images. I paused. I did want to tell her about life before hand-held hair dryers, curling irons, and automatic ice machines in refrigerators, but decided to enjoy playing in raked leaves and sharing giggles and “young” things with her which I couldn’t do if I revealed “my days.” It would sound so old, just like my mother’s did for me. So, I merely answered, “Yes, Elaina, I was a very little girl during black and white.”

Haman’s ‘Family Tree’

Thursday, March 1st, 2012

This Purim centerpiece is sure to keep all your guests “hanging around” until dessert. This project can be put together on any level, from simple backyard branches with plain gingerbread man cookies dangling, to curly willow branches with elaborately decorated royal iced gingerbread man cookies – and everything in between! Before you can say all of Haman’s 10 sons in one breath – the cookies will be gone.

 

Here is a basic cookie recipe to get you started:

Ingredients

4 cups flour 1 cup margarine 1-1/4 cups sugar 2 eggs 1/2 T. lemon juice 1 tsp. baking powder 1 T. vanilla sugar 1/4 c. orange juice

Directions

Mix flour and margarine in a large mixing bowl. Add sugar and eggs; mix. Add remaining dough ingredients; mix until well-combined. Roll dough out on parchment paper or cookie sheet.

Preparing Cookies For Tree

Supplies:

Cookie dough Gingerbread man cookie cutter You may use any of the following supplies to decorate your cookies (or keep them plain): Edible markers, colored sugar, rolled fondant or royal icing Hamentash chocolate mold 3 oz baking chocolate 5 oz yellow baking chocolate 4 yards and 1/8”of ribbon (cut into 12” pieces)

Directions

1. Roll out dough. 2. Using you cookie cutter, cut out 11 cookies (if you like you can make “Haman” larger) 3. Using a drinking straw, make a hole towards the top of the gingerbread man’s head. Bake according to recipe directions. (If using the recipe above: Bake at 350° for 12 to 15 minutes.) 4. Decorate cookies as desired 5. Thead ribbon through hole. Join ends of ribbon to form a tight knot. 6. Melt baking chocolate in double boiler or microwave. 7. Using a toothpick,” paint” the chocolate in the center of the hamantash mold. Allow to dry (approx 5 minutes) 8. Next, add the yellow chocolate to the bowl and remelt until the chocolate is well combined 9. Using a small spoon, fill the hamentash mold with the chocolate. 10. Place chocolate mold in freezer till solid. 11. Remove hamentash from molds. 12. Repeat process till each gingerbread man has a hat 13. Using the chocolate as your” glue” attach hamentash to cookie

 

Haman’s Tree

Supplies

Curly Willow branches (available at florists) or you can use backyard branches Large vase to fit branches 3-4 yards of 5/8 “ wide ribbon for bows 1 yard of 1-1/2“ wide ribbon 11 gingerbread cookies

Assembly

Arrange branches in vase Hang cookies from branches Cut 5/8” ribbon into 12” pieces-randomly tie bows around branches Wrap the 1-1/2” ribbon around vase and form bow. TIP: Instead of using a vase and branches, you can hang cookies from your chandelier over your dining table.

Cut out desired shapes with cookie cuttters and remove extra dough. Reroll extra dough and cut out additional cookies, continuing until all dough has been used.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/potpourri/hamans-family-tree/2012/03/01/

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