web analytics
April 20, 2014 / 20 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘paper of record’

Technology, the Move to the Right and The Jewish Press

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

We live in a world of great technological flux. When I was growing up, life was fairly predictable. Things hardly changed at all. Decades would go by and a newspaper stayed pretty much the same… reporting news, commentary, sports, and entertainment. TV was about network broadcast. TV news was the most widely used method for people to get the news.Telephones were land lines and used exclusively to make phone calls.

Then… at the tail end of the 20th century – along came cable TV, the VCR, the mobile telephone, and the internet. That changed everything. The world as we knew it then no longer exists. With the advent of these things and improvements to them occurring in near rapid fire fashion – the only thing that seems constant now… is change. The moment you buy one item, a new improved one comes along making the one you just bought obsolete. It’s truly hard to keep up. And it’s expensive to buy all these new items all the time. Not to mention the expense of data plans required to use most of them.

The most stable items of the past are now running the risk of extinction. Telephone calls are giving way to text messaging. Books are giving way to e-books. Newspapers are giving way to internet news sites.

As a lover of technology I used to be able to keep up on new developments. But things are happening so fast that I can no longer do that without spending time on it that I don’t have. Which is a bit distressing for a technophile like me.

One of the industries that seems to be suffering the most is the newspaper industry. Giants like the New York Times are struggling to stay alive. Weekly periodicals like Newsweek have already conceded defeat and have gone entirely electronic.

As it affects me and other observant Jews the idea that newspapers and books are becoming obsolete is not a good outcome. That is because of Shabbos. On Shabbos observant Jews turn off their electronics. It is a violation of Halacha to use electronic devices on that day. The reasons for that are complex and beyond the scope of this essay.

The elimination of electronics on our day of rest assures the continuation of the publication of Seforim and books that interest the observant reader. Like those published by ArtScroll. And it gives a reprieve from extinction to Orthodox newspapers and magazines. My observation is that there has never been a better time for them than right now.

Which brings me to three publications worthy of discussion. The Jewish Press, Mishpacha Magazine, and Ami Magazine. The two latter ones having debuted relatively recently. They both seem to be flourishing. With Ami, the newest ‘kid on the block’ catching up to rival Mishpacha in circulation.

These two magazines are quite modern in terms of design. With its glossy paper, good photography,state of the art layout and graphics they are easily on par with any secular counterpart like Time and the now defunct Newsweek. The articles are for the most part well written… and an easy read on a Shabbos afternoon. And for the most part pretty informative.

And then there is the Jewish Press. I believe they must be suffering a loss of readership because of competition from these magazines. If that is true, it is very sad although understandable. It’s hard to complete with a couple of ‘glossies’ who have some very talented regular columnists writing for them. Like Jonathan Rosenblum, Avi Shafran, Eitan Kobre, and Emanuel Feldman among others. They also try to cater to a broad based observant readership including Modern Orthodox Jews by featuring articles about Rav Hershel Shachter, the Rav, Rav Aharon Soloveichik and other non Charedi figures – placing them all in a good light forthe most part.

Although these glossies do a good job in attracting readers, they do not represent in any way a moderate all inclusive Hashkafa. Nor do they have the broad representation of Hashkafos as does the Jewish Press.

The truth is that the Jewish Press is really the best of the three in terms of what really counts – content. Even though I do not always agree with their editorial positions. The only thing missing is the ‘glossy’ look of its competitors. But on every other level it is better than both Ami and Mishpacha. There is no doubt in my mind that they represent every Hashkafa in a fair and unbiased way, They feature columnists from all segments of Orthodoxy. And they refuse to cater to the extreme right by not publishing pictures of women. Something both Mishpacha and Ami do. The Jewish Press is definitely fair and more balanced.

Spinning Reality

Friday, September 21st, 2001

There is no question that many everyday Palestinians experience disruption in their daily lives because of Israeli security measures against infiltration. It could not be otherwise but that Israel's need to restrict terrorist access to its citizens would also impact on the mobility of those workaday Palestinians. There also can be no question that the overhanging Palestinian terrorist threat is the reason for the stringent Israeli security measures. So, although we have come not to expect too much objectivity these days from The New York Times, the “paper of record” outdid itself on Tuesday. For The Times, the only story to be told about Israel's security measures was the impact they are having on Palestinian civilians.

Entitled, “For Palestinians, A Daily, Dirty Obstacle Course,” and appearing on the front page, it began with,

This is where the miserable part of Dr. Dima Amin's day kicks in, on the stretch of a broken road running past a Palestinian refugee camp. This is where she finds out if it will take forever for her to get to work in Jerusalem, or just horribly long.

“You never can tell,” Dr. Amin said.” “Sometimes it's easy, other times…” She did not have to say more. A roll of the eyes said it all.

“It makes you so stressed,” she said, “every single day.”

And so it went.

But is that really the story to be told about lives being intruded upon? What about ordinary Israelis being at risk when walking the streets, or going to work, or to a cafe or pizza shop? What about kids going to school, to a sports event, or on a bus? After all, Israel is reacting defensively while its citizens are being threatened by purposeful terror. For Heaven's sake, the Palestinians regularly proclaim their intentions to kill Jews! And incredibly, The Times story quotes the very same Palestinian leaders, complaining of the restrictions, who are complicit in the suicide bombings.

In a larger sense, of course, Israel's actions are no where as onerous as America's immigration policy. For economic reasons, we restrict access of foreign nationals altogether. In Israel's case, Palestinian workers are merely regulated in their comings and goings.

Yet, the Middle East being what it is, this reality is not the one that rises to the surface.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/editorial/spinning-reality/2001/09/21/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: