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November 25, 2014 / 3 Kislev, 5775
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Posts Tagged ‘Parshas Noach’

Parshas Noach

Wednesday, October 17th, 2012

New York City
CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
October 19, 2012 – 3 Cheshvan 5773
5:49 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

 

Sabbath Ends: 6:53 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Weekly Reading: Noach
Weekly Haftara: Roni Akara (Isaiah 54:1-55:5)
Daf Yomi: Shabbos 16
Mishna Yomit: Nazir 2:5-6
Halacha Yomit: Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 139:5-7
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Kelim chap. 6-4
Earliest Time for Tallis and Tefillin: 6:18 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 9:56 a.m. NYC E.D.T.

Parshas Noach

Wednesday, October 26th, 2011

Vol. LXII No. 43                                           5772

New York City

CANDLE LIGHTING TIME

October 28, 2011 – 30  Tishrei 5772

5:37 NYC E.D.T.

 

Sabbath Ends: 6:43 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

Weekly Reading: Noach

Weekly Haftara: Koh Amar Hashem (Isaiah 66:1-24)

Daf Yomi: Chullin 124

Mishna Yomit: Pesachim 9:4-5

Halacha Yomit: Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 181: 1-5

Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Metam’ei Mishkav u’Moshav  chap. 1-3

Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin 6:27 a.m. NYC E.D.T.

Latest Kerias Shema: 10:01 a.m. NYC E.D.T.

 

Today is Rosh Chodesh Cheshvan (Rosh Chodesh is 2 days, Friday and Shabbos). Friday morning: Shacharis with inclusion of Ya’aleh VeYavo in the Shemoneh Esreh. Following chazzan’s repetition we say half-Hallel, Kaddish Tiskabbel. We take out one Sefer Torah from the Ark. We read in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:1-15), we call four Aliyos (Kohen, Levi, Yisrael, Yisrael), the Baal Keriah recites half-Kaddish. We return the Torah to the Ark, Ashrei, U’va LeTziyyon – we delete Lamenatze’ach – the chazzan recites half-Kaddish; all then remove their tefillin.

Mussaf of Rosh Chodesh, followed by chazzan’s repetition and Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, Shir Shel Yom, Borchi Nafshi and their respective Kaddish recitals (for mourners). Nusach Sefarad say Shir Shel Yom and Borchi Nafshi after half-Hallel. Before Aleinu they add Ein K’Elokeinu with Kaddish DeRabbanan.

Mincha: In the Shemoneh Esreh we say Ya’aleh VeYavo, followed by chazzan’s repetition and Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu and Mourner’s Kaddish.

Birkas Hamazon: In the Grace after Meals we add Ya’aleh VeYavo as well as mention of Rosh Chodesh in Beracha Acharona (Me’ein Shalosh) at all times.

Friday evening, Kabbalas Shabbos and the usual Maariv tefilla with inclusion of Ya’aleh VeYavo in the Shemoneh Esreh. If one forgot to say Ya’aleh VeYavo – at Maariv only one does not repeat. (The Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 422:1, based on Berachos 30b, explains this as due to the fact that we do not sanctify the new month at night – and this rule applies even when Rosh Chodesh is two days.)

Shabbos mornings: Shacharis is usual Shabbos tefilla with inclusion of Ya’aleh VeYavo in the Shemoneh Esreh as well as in the chazzan’s repetition, followed by half-Hallel, Kaddish Tiskabbel. We remove two Torah scrolls from the Ark and in the first we read the weekly portion of Noach and call seven Aliyos. We then call the Maftir and read from the second Sefer Torah in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:9-15). We then read the Haftara, Hashamayim Kis’i (Yeshayahu 66:1-24). We say Yekum Purkan, we do not say Av HaRachamim, nor is there Hazkaras Neshamos, but we continue with Ashrei. We return the scrolls to the Ark and the chazzan says half-Kaddish.

Mussaf: Instead of Tikkanta Shabbos we substitute Ata Yatzarta and in the Korbanos (sacrifices) we mention both Shabbos and Rosh Chodesh; after chazzan’s repetition, Kaddish Tiskabbel followed by Ein K’Elokeinu, Aleinu, Shir Shel Yom and Borchi Nafshi and their respective Kaddish recitals (for mourners). Nusach Sefarad say Shir Shel Yom and Borchi Nafshi after Shacharis.

Mincha is usual Shabbos tefilla. We include Ya’aleh VeYavo in the Shemoneh Esreh. We do not say Tzidkas’cha. Maariv is the usual Motza’ei Shabbos tefilla.

                        The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by may congregations and Yeshivos for our brothers and sisters in Eretz Yisrael: Chapter 83, 130, 142. – Y.K.

You’ve Got To Believe!

Wednesday, July 15th, 2009

In Memory Of My Dear Brother Nachman Arye Ben Meir HaLevi

I had no way of seeing it coming – a “quick” traffic light and I was caught in the middle of a sea of cars. The second I started to run I was horrified to see the car closest to me race in my direction. I felt doomed. The few seconds it took me to run past the car were filled with the terrible thought, “This is it. That car is going to hit me.”

Against all logic and the laws of nature, I found myself safe, not a scratch on me. I was relieved to find myself out of harm’s way, stopping at the side of the car that had just menaced me.

The driver had stopped her car once I made it out of her way. Miraculously, I was no longer in danger. Standing at the side of her car I found myself screaming at the driver. She never looked at me. She just stared straight ahead, as if in a trance. (Oh, my gosh. A driver in a trance.) When I finished venting my rage that awful driver continued on her way.

I completed crossing the street. Thank goodness the other cars waited for me. My mind was racing, trying to make sense out of what had just occurred. The frightening scene played again and again in my mind.

Then I came to terms with the fact that the unbelievable had happened. I outran a speeding car. Hashem in his mercy suspended the laws of nature so that I might live. (Someone jokingly said that I should sleep in the shoes I wore that day.)

Once I calmed down I remembered the envelope in my pocketbook. I took it out and put it in the mailbox. The night before I had offhandedly picked up an envelope for charity and thought I might as well make a donation. That was the envelope I just mailed. I now realize that it just may have been the reason I was saved. There is a saying that charity saves from death.

The next day was Shabbos and in shul, Chabad of Memphis, Rabbi Levi Klein arranged for me to Bentsch Gomel. I’m sort of a private person, but I did not mind one bit getting up to say that special prayer in gratitude to Hashem. I was alive.

The Torah portion that Shabbos was Parshas Noach. I was reading along in English when my mind went back to a beautiful Shabbos day in 1991 when I lived in Manhattan. On that afternoon, my brother Norman, a”h, and I took a walk to the South Street Seaport.

I do not remember which one of us saw it first, the beautiful cloud decorated with circles, each containing a color of the rainbow. It seemed to travel with us as we walked. It was a stunning work of art in the sky.

My brother’s take on it was that the form that enclosed all those fascinating colors was a cloud, and not the usual arc of the rainbow, because the cloud we were seeing signified that it would serve a very specific purpose. Without my brother going into detail, I knew it was almost like a prayer on the part of my big brother that I would be protected in some special way.

So here I am all those years later, thanking Hashem for keeping my body – indeed my very life – intact.

Parshas Noach, always one of my favorite readings, depicts Hashem’s mercy, for He gave us the rainbow as a sign of comfort that He would never totally destroy us. What an appropriate reading for the day after my close call.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/jewish-columns/lessons-in-emunah/youve-got-to-believe/2009/07/15/

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