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January 23, 2017 / 25 Tevet, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘population’

As 5777 Rolls In, Israel’s Population at 8.585 Million

Wednesday, September 28th, 2016

On the eve of the Jewish new year 5777, Israel’s population is estimated at 8.585 million, not including about 183 thousand foreign residents, according to a statement released Tuesday by the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics.

The Jewish population of Israel has reached about 6.419 million, constituting 74.8% of the overall population.

The Arab population is 1.786 million, or 20.8% of the overall population.

Non-Arab Christians, as well as members of other religions and individuals without religious affiliation are estimated at 380 thousand, about 4.4% of the overall population.

Since last Rosh Hashanah, Israel’s population has grown by about 172,000. The rate of growth remained at 2%, similar to previous years.

About 189 thousand babies were born in Israel in 5776, and an estimated 46 thousand passed away.

Some 30 thousand were added to the immigration balance, 25 thousand out of them new olim.

It should be noted that 5776 was a leap year, with 13 lunar months, or 385 days.

JNi.Media

Israel Revisits Importing Foreign Workers for Hi-Tech

Sunday, July 31st, 2016

The government Cabinet discussed a proposal Sunday to inject more foreign workers into the hi-tech sector.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said in his opening remarks that while new sectors of Israel’s population are being trained — including the hareidi-religious and Israeli-Arab populations — the government is still considering permits for foreign workers.

The decision, he said, would “aid in the continued growth of the high-tech sector in Israel. The demand is enormous and the supply of workers is small,” he explained. “We are using various means to increase the supply of trained high-tech workers. We have turned to populations that have not been involved in high-tech until now, such as the ultra-orthodox and of course our Arab citizens.

“We are also trying various means to train our young people, also in mathematics, computer and science studies – this will take time.

“In the meantime, we are interested in assisting the absorption of a limited number of expert workers, who could help in passing the standardized exams in order to ease the absorption of workers with unique know-how.

“The Cabinet will make it possible for their spouses to stay in Israel and work here legally,” he said.

“This is what is being done in the Silicon Valley in the United States, and this is giving them considerable strength and, of course, it doubles employment for the local population in the United States. We will do this here as well,” he said.

Hana Levi Julian

New Ruling Requires Both Mothers Listed on Birth Certificate

Tuesday, July 26th, 2016

Israel’s Family Court has ordered the Interior Ministry to list both mothers on the birth certificates of children of gay couples.

The ruling, to cover both the biological and adoptive mothers, came after a petition to the court by attorney Daniela Yaakovi, representing three couples of two “mothers.”

Each case was won by Yaakovi, who said Sunday, “These are precedent-setting rulings, in practice an expression of the existing situation and the parental connection that is established from the moment of birth.

“They will end the discriminatory practice of the Interior Ministry which refuses to issue birth certificates with the names of two parents of the same sex.”

The ruling did not address cases where the couples involved two men.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Israeli ‘Law and Order Bill’ Approved by Cabinet

Sunday, July 24th, 2016

The Israeli government approved on Sunday a new law described by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as a bill to “increase and strengthen enforcement in the field of planning and construction.”

Dubbed by some as the “law and order bill,” the law is also being called the “one state, one law” bill, a measure Netanyahu says is intended to equalized enforcement of the laws across all populations.

“Our government is investing considerable resources in developing the Arab sector – economic development, education, transportation, housing solutions and other issues,” the prime minister said in opening remarks to the weekly cabinet meeting.

“Alongside all of these, we are working to create a reality of one state with one law; law and order for everyone, without exception. This is desirable and the time has come for it to be so in the State of Israel.”

One of the issues that may be addressed by this bill is the rage invariably provoked when police enforce demolition of illegal structures that are built by Arabs.

Illegal structures built by Jews are also demolished, and those demolitions provoke equal rancor but generally are completed with far less violence and danger to the engineers and/or security forces involved in the operation. Moreover, there are far fewer illegal structures built by Jews, and fewer Jewish squatters. The difference in the numbers and the response to enforcement of the laws is one of the driving forces behind the creation of the law.

A new division was also created in the Israel Police earlier this year with an eye towards law enforcement in the Arab sector.

This past April, Israel Police Chief Roni Alsheikh appointed the department’s first Muslim deputy commissioner-year-old Gemal Hakrush, the highest-ranking Muslim ever to serve in the force.

Hakrush heads a new Israel Police division to deal with law enforcement in the Arab sector, which comprises 20 percent of the nation’s population and where customs and culture codes are different, with Israeli police held in deep suspicion. In some areas, they are simply outright feared or hated, with Israeli Arab police officers considered “traitors.”

Hana Levi Julian

Israel Among Top Five Countries on WHO 2015 Life Expectancy Chart

Friday, May 20th, 2016

Only 22 countries around the globe have reached an average life expectancy at birth greater than 80 years, according to the World Health Organization’s Global Health Observatory (GHO) data, which would suggest that if one is planning to retire abroad, one should consider those countries most seriously.

Life expectancy at birth reflects the overall mortality level of a population. It summarizes the mortality pattern that prevails across all age groups in a given year – children and adolescents, adults and the elderly. Global life expectancy at birth in 2015 was 71.4 years (73.8 years for females and 69.1 years for males), ranging from 60.0 years in the WHO African Region to 76.8 years in the WHO European Region, giving a ratio of 1.3 between the two regions. Women live longer than men all around the world. The gap in life expectancy between the sexes was 4.5 years in 1990 and had remained almost the same by 2015 (4.6).

Global average life expectancy increased by 5 years between 2000 and 2015, the fastest increase since the 1960s. Those gains reverse declines during the 1990s, when life expectancy fell in Africa because of the AIDS epidemic, and in Eastern Europe following the collapse of the Soviet Union. The 2000-2015 increase was greatest in the WHO African Region, where life expectancy increased by 9.4 years to 60 years, driven mainly by improvements in child survival, and expanded access to antiretrovirals for treatment of HIV.

As to the friendly global race of whose citizens get to live longer, the top countries are, in descending order: Japan – 83.7, Switzerland – 83.4, Singapore – 83.1, Italy – 82.7, and Israel – 82.5. The US did not make the 80+ club in 2015, with only 79.3 years’ life expectancy. Neither did the Russian Federation – 70.5.

Israel’s neighbors are definitely not ideal locations for retirement: Egypt – 70.9, Jordan – 74.1, Lebanon – 74.9, and Syria – 64.5 (if you’re lucky). Nigeria stands out with 54.5 life expectancy, along with Angola – 52.4, Burkina Faso – 59.9, Burundi – 59.6, Cameroon – 57.3, Central African Republic – 52.5, Chad – 53.1, Guinea – 59, and Guinea-Bissau – 58.9.

So, here is the list of world countries where you’ll get to grow older than 80, barring unexpected circumstances:

Japan – 83.7
Switzerland – 83.4
Singapore – 83.1
Italy – 82.7
Israel – 82.5
France – 82.4
Sweden – 82.4
Canada – 82.2
Luxembourg – 82
Netherlands – 81.9
Norway – 81.8
Malta – 81.7
New Zealand – 81.6
Austria – 81.5
Belgium – 81.1
Finland – 81.1
Germany – 81
Denmark – 80.6
Chile – 80.5
Cyprus – 80.5

JNi.Media

On Eve of 2016 Israel Boasts Population of 8.5 Million

Thursday, December 31st, 2015

(JNi.media) According to the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics, on December 31, 2015, Israel’s population is estimated at 8,462,000.

An estimated 6,335,000 are Jews (74.9% of the population). 1,757,000 are Arabs (20.7%). And 370,000 are classified as “other” (4.4%).

During 2015, the population of Israel grew by 2%.

During the year an estimated 176,700 babies were born, 74% Jewish, 23% Arab and 4.4% “other.”

An estimated 28,000 Olim arrived in Israel (this number clashes with preliminary figures provided by the UJA putting this figure at 33,000). The main countries the newcomers came from are France (25%), Ukraine (24%), Russia (23%), and the United States (9%).

These population estimates do not include the population of foreign workers living in Israel, which was estimated at about 192,000 at the end of 2014.

JNi.Media

Jewish New Year’s Eve: Israel Reaches 8.4M

Tuesday, September 8th, 2015

In the past year, the State of Israel has enlarged its population 1.9 percent, or 158,000 new citizens.

During this past year, 168,000 new Israelis were born and 42,000 died. In addition, 28,000 new olim arrived on aliyah – a 35 percent increase over last year.

The highest percent of new immigrants came from war-torn Ukraine (26 percent), closely followed by France (25 percent), where anti-Semitism is skyrocketing. Those populations were not far ahead of Russia, whose immigration statistic for the year was 21 percent. Immigration from the U.S. only reached nine percent.

Of the now 8.412 million people living in the State of Israel, 6.3 million – the vast majority (74.9 percent) – are Jews.

The next largest population (20.7 percent) in the country is comprised of Israeli Arabs, some 1.746 million people.

The rest (4.4 percent) – 366,000 – are a mix of residents who hail from various other ethnic groups and faiths.

It is believed by those who work in demographics in the Central Bureau of Statistics that Israel’s population will grow to 10 million sometime between 2025 and 2030.

Hana Levi Julian

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/jewish-new-years-eve-israel-reaches-8-4m/2015/09/08/

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