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December 7, 2016 / 7 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘pottery’

High School Students Help Discover a Unique 1,600 Year Old Pottery Workshop in the Galilee

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

By Michael Zeff/TPS

Galilee (TPS) – High school students assisting an Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) archaeological survey discovered an ancient Roman pottery workshop in the Western Galilee.

“We have been conducting a large scale survey and excavations in the town of Shlomi at the request of the local municipal council and the Israel Lands Authority for the past six months, ” IAA geologist Anastasia Shapiro told Tazpit Press Service (TPS). “We unearthed an impressive factory for the manufacturing of jars, urns, and various vessels as part of the project.”

According to Israeli law, IAA experts must conduct an archaeological survey of any construction site before issuing approval to begin building on it.

The pottery factory, which includes a unique kiln, storehouses, water basins, and mosaic floors, was dated by the IAA to the late Roman Period, roughly 1,600 years ago.

“The kiln, which was only recently discovered, is the ‘cherry on top’ for this excavation,” Shapiro explained to TPS. “As archaeologists, we have encountered many ancient kilns, but they were all built or constructed out of stone. This one, however, is the first to be discovered that was actually excavated into the rock.”

According to Shapiro, it is very rare to discover a complete kiln as they tend to break or be destroyed with time. In this case, the entire structure of the kiln has been preserved as it is made out of one piece of solid rock.

“There is no other known discovery like this. It is simply one of a kind,” said Shapiro.

IAA archaeologists also concluded that the pottery workshop itself was an important, thriving one. The ceramic debris that was discovered around the kiln indicates that two types of vessels were manufactured by the workshop–storage jars that could be transported overland and amphorae that were used to store wine or oil to be exported from Israel by sea.

The discovery was aided by a large group of high school students from neighboring communities and from the cities of Nahariya and Qiryat Bialik.

“The students who volunteered on this project since May exposed the walls of the ancient workshop prior to the discovery of the kiln itself, as well as other features of the complex, such as water holes and mosaic floors,” explained Shapiro.

The students who assisted in the discovery were part of a large group of students who have been participating in archeological excavations in six different sites around the Galilee. The Ministry of Education has been encouraging Israeli teens to enhance their education outside of the classroom in order to increase student involvement in various public projects in neighboring communities.

“One can learn a lot during a history lesson in school, but there’s nothing like actually holding history in one’s hands,” Gilad Zinamon, an IAA education coordinator, told TPS.

TPS / Tazpit News Agency

Jerusalem’s Armenian Pottery

Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015

One of the four quarters of Jerusalem’s Old City is the Armenian Quarter. It’s located between the Yafo and Zion gates.

Armenians have been in Jerusalem since the fourth century CE. Though many arrived only after the 1915 Armenian Genocide committed by Turkey.

The entire Armenian quarter consists of no more than around 1000 people.

But there you can find genuine (Jerusalem-style) Armenian pottery and artwork, and even watch as it’s made.

JERUSALEM OLD CITY

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‘Sunken Treasure Chest’ of Ancient Pottery found in Woman’s Basement

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

“Hello, Israel Antiquities Authority? Look, I am cleaning out my basement and there is a whole bunch of pottery and other stuff here that my family of fishermen left me. Maybe you guys want the junk so my grandchildren can see it in the future?”

That is not a direct quote, but is closer to the truth than what the archaeologists at IAA expected when they arrived at the home of Osnat Lester in the northern Israel tower of Poriya.

They certainly did not they would discover a whole treasure of well-preserved ancient pottery.

They found a bunch of boxed that contained ancient and rare unbroken pottery vessels. Lester explained that a fisherman in her family had hauled the pottery out of the Mediterranean Sea.

The vessels cover several period of time, evidence of the importance of the Mediterranean in journeys my merchants whose wares often were left behind or were sunk, often with their ships, said IAA spokeswoman Yoli Shwartz.

One of the vases was identified as being about 3,000 years old, at the time of the Jewish kingdoms. Other pieces of pottery were from the Roman and Byzantine periods.

 

 

 

 

Jewish Press News Briefs

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