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April 23, 2014 / 23 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Presidents Conference’

Jewish Leaders: Arabs Looking to Israel to Eliminate Iran Threat

Thursday, February 23rd, 2012

JERUSALEM – A number of pro-Western Arab leaders have told officials of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations that “Israel remains the only hope of confronting and eliminating the Iranian threat to the entire Middle East region.”

Malcolm Hoenlein, executive vice chairman of the Presidents Conference, acknowledged during a press conference at Jerusalem’s Inbal Hotel earlier this week that he and other high-ranking Jewish organizational leaders have conducted “ongoing quiet discussions with Arab leaders whose goals are not to get headlines, but rather to engage in serious dialogue based on regional issues.”

Hoenlein added, “While I choose not to reveal their names, they have all expressed serious concern about Iran and are interested in making peace with Israel. They are serious about what they say and proof of that has been seen in recent weeks, as you don’t hear many of these leaders raise the Palestinian issue against Israel in our discussions or in the headlines.”

Richard B. Stone, the new chairman of the Presidents Conference, told The Jewish Press, “You can see that the Palestinian issue, and the peace process in general, have also receded into the background within the White House during the past few weeks. Even the Europeans are with us [on the issue of Iran] as much as they can be. During private talks with leading politicians in Europe, we also discovered pro-Israel support in places that we didn’t expect.”

On Tuesday members of the Presidents Conference, who were in Israel for their annual weeklong leadership mission, quietly slipped away from the Inbal Hotel with an armed escort and traveled to Amman for a meeting with King Abdullah II.

The delegation had a “remarkably candid and open exchange” with the king, Hoenlein said upon his return from the Jordanian capital. Hoenlein said Abdullah, who has been harshly critical of Netanyahu, voiced his “appreciation” for the Israeli leader’s efforts at “creating a climate in which negotiations can move forward.”

The delegation in turn told the king it appreciated “the role he is playing in trying to bring the Palestinians to direct negotiations” with Israel, said Hoenlein.

Also in their hour-long meeting, Abdullah and the Jewish leaders discussed issues related to Syria and Iran, as well as reforms in Jordan, Hoenlein said.

In addition to the king, the delegation met with the Jordanian foreign minister and the U.S. and Israeli ambassadors to Jordan.

Hoenlein met with Abdullah a month ago in Washington and proposed the Amman meeting with Jewish leaders. The king was receptive to the idea and instructed his staff to work with the Presidents Conference.

In his address to the Presidents Conference on Sunday, Netanyahu avoided speaking about a possible Israeli military strike against Iran, choosing instead to focus on what he called “four great challenges.”

Israel, he said, “must deal with the threat of a nuclear armed Iran, missile attacks from our neighbors, cyber warfare and border penetration by thousands of illegal refugees who could engulf the country. Meeting these challenges will require ingenuity, dedication, management and a lot of money.”

Netanyahu also said Israel’s economy must continue to grow to support financing of the increased defense needs.

Netanyahu said that when the revolutions across the Arab landscape began, he heard criticism that he was not optimistic enough.

“I think optimism is being realistic and addressing things as they are, and we looked at it with sober eyes and we said it might go to the Google generation, but it might not – it might go to the Islamist direction. And by and large it has,” he said.

Netanyahu said that since most of the Arab countries that had rebellions now being run by Islamists – with Iran as exemplar, achieving progress with the Palestinians is difficult because they “pile precondition on precondition” in order to appease their radical patrons.

The increased cost of defending the Jewish state, and leaving enough money for social, educational, and health needs, cannot hinge on foreign assistance and must come from the country’s economy, Netanyahu said.

– Supplemental reporting by JTA

Goldmann’s Questionable Quote

Wednesday, May 28th, 2008

Shakespeare had it right: the evil that men do indeed lives after them. Case in point: Nahum Goldmann, who served in a variety of Jewish and Zionist organizational leadership posts from the 1920’s through the 1970’s (he died in 1982).

Despite the decades he spent in the arena fighting for Jewish causes, Goldmann was a notorious wild card who mistook his own often idiosyncratic views for the Wisdom of the Ages and who had a penchant for criticizing Israel vociferously and publicly (in fact, the more public his forum, the more vociferous his criticism).

In his 1978 book The Jewish Paradox – a manifesto of wrong-headed thinking about Jews, Israel and the Middle East – Goldmann unloaded a bushel of shockingly obtuse and naïve statements, a number of which are given loving prominence in articles on pro-Arab and neo-Nazi websites. By far the most notorious is the following eyebrow-raising statement Goldmann claims was made to him by David Ben-Gurion in 1955:

…. Why should the Arabs make peace? If I was an Arab leader I would never make terms with Israel. That is natural: we have taken their country. Sure, God promised it to us, but what does it matter to them? Our God is not theirs. We come from Israel, it’s true, but two thousand years ago, and what is that to them? There has been anti-Semitism, the Nazis, Hitler, Auschwitz, but was that their fault? They only see one thing: We have come here and stolen their country. Why should they accept that?

Now, it could be that Ben-Gurion said, word for word, exactly what Goldmann attributed to him. But all sorts of red flags should pop up since (a) there is no independent verification of the quote; (b) the statement jibes perfectly, in tone and sentiment, with Goldmann’s own oft-expressed views; (c) Goldmann waited some 23 years to make it public; and (d) Ben-Gurion, conveniently dead for five years at the time of the book’s publication, was in no position to acknowledge or deny Goldmann’s veracity.

But none of the above prevented the historian Benny Morris from mentioning the quote in his new book 1948: The First Arab-Israeli War or David Margolick from citing it in his New York Times review of Morris’s book.

How Machiavellian and self-centered an individual was Nahum Goldmann? In a 1978 article in New York magazine, Sol Stern reported that Goldmann had traveled to Washington to urge Carter administration officials to “break the back” of the Israel lobby, “plead[ing] with the administration to stand firm and not back off from confrontations with the organized Jewish community as other administrations had done.”

In his 1987 book The Lobby, a decidedly unfavorable look at how the organized Jewish community influences U.S. Middle East policy, Edward Tivnan elaborated:

[Carter] and his men could not quite believe their ears. Goldmann had devoted his long life to Zionism, had been a major player in the “Jewish lobby” since the Truman Administration, had, in fact, invented one of the lobby’s most effective players, the Presidents’ Conference, and here he was actually arguing that his own brainchild, the Presidents’ Conference, had become a “destructive force” and a “major obstacle” to peace in the Middle East. Goldmann contended that despite the flak the White House would get in the beginning, eventually, if the Israelis compromised and a peace settlement were reached, Carter would emerge as “the hero of the Jews.”

The proposal was riddled with an irony that was probably beyond the people in the room. Goldmann had created the Presidents’ Conference to prevent the kind of dissent among American Jewish leaders that he himself was now demonstrating. The raison d’etre of the group was to present a united front to the White House on Middle East matters. But, of course, that was back when Goldmann’s friends were running Israel.

Now that [Menachem] Begin was running the Jewish state, Goldmann was willing to do anything to undermine his policies – including destroying his own pressure group….

In The Jewish Paradox Goldmann wrote: “The Israelis have the great weakness of thinking that the whole world revolves around them” – a monumental act of projection and a far more fitting epitaph for Goldmann himself, a man who time and again showed himself to care considerably less about Israel than about his own standing and reputation, and whose grotesque ego made him willing, even eager, to undermine Israel whenever the nation or its leaders failed to conform to his expectations and preferences.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/media-monitor/goldmanns-questionable-quote/2008/05/28/

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