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Posts Tagged ‘Priestly Blessing’

Birkat Cohanim

Sunday, September 22nd, 2013

On Sunday morning, the traditional Birkat Cohanim, Blessing of the Priests, was held in the Kotel plaza. The Kotel was packed.

.Birkat Cohanim

 

 

 

.Shacharit on Sukkot at the Kotel

 

 

 

.Priestly Blessing at the Kotel

 

Next year on the Temple Mount.

WoW Miss their Chance for Equality at Kotel Priestly Blessing

Sunday, September 22nd, 2013

Tens of thousands of Jews prayed at the Western Wall Sunday, the fourth day of Sukkot, and received the traditional priestly blessing of dozens of Kohenim, but no Women of the Wall tried to join.

Kohenim are of the priestly tribe traced to the Biblical High Priest Aaron.

The Women of the Wall have campaigned vigorously the past year to pressure for the same religious standing of men to read from a Torah scroll and wear tefillin at the Western Wall. They have succeeded in winning the right to pray as they wish at the southern section of the Western Wall, known as Robinson’s Arch and not adjacent to the more widely-known section of the Wall.

So why didn’t they try to prove again that “equal” mean the “same” and presume they are Kohenim. Don’t Reform Jews deserve their blessing?

The Reform movement generally maintains a policy of “equality” and rejects the distinctions between Kohenim and other Israeli tribes, but some Reform and Conservative prayer groups allow the daughter of a Kohen to perform the Priestly Blessing.

The same prayer groups also call a daughter of a Kohen to the reading of the Torah, in place of the traditional recognition of a Kohen for the Torah portion that is chanted in Israel on the Sabbath, holidays, Rosh Chodesh (the beginning of the month and on Mondays and Thursdays.

The Kohenim were active in sacrifices in the Holy Temples, and Reform and Conservative thought concludes that since the Temples have been destroyed and there are no sacrifices today, the designation of a Kohen is either out of date or is not restricted to men. The Conservative movement is split with two opposing opinions on whether a daughter of a Kohen can perform the Priestly Blessing.

Most Reform and Conservative congregations omit the Priestly Blessing, which in Orthodox congregations in the Diaspora are performed only on the three festivals of Passover, Shavuot and Sukkot. The blessing is recited toward the end of the additional Musaf prayers. Reform Jews usually don’t bother themselves with praying too much, and they delete Musaf.

Reform Rabbi Jeffrey W. Goldwasser posted on a website “More liberal communities, those that insist on thorough gender equality, do not observe the distinction of Kohanim and Levi’im at all.”

Reform Jews, with their 11th Commandment of equality, declare that all Jews are equal in their functions as Jews. All of us are the same. Everyone is a priest, everyone can wear tefillin, everyone can read from the Torah, and everyone can do pretty much as he or she pleases.

That begs one question: If all are equal, if Jewish law rejects the Torah as the living law of today, and if every Jew can understand the Torah as he wants, why is there such a thing as a Reform “rabbi”?

So much for equality.

Video: Under the Prayer Shawl – Secrets of the Priestly Blessing

Tuesday, April 10th, 2012

“Under the Prayer Shawl – Secrets of the Priestly Blessing”, was shot on location at the 2011 annual massive blessing by the Jewish Priests (Kohanim) at the Western Wall (Kotel) in Jerusalem during the Passover festival. The Kohanim (priests) are Jews descended directly from Aaron, the older brother of the Biblical Moses, who was given the special duty to bless the nation of Israel. See how this mystical practice continues today and how it has passed, in surprising ways, into world culture.

Photo Essay: Jerusalem Pilgrimage and Priestly Blessings 5772

Monday, April 9th, 2012

Jewish worshippers cover themselves with prayer shawls as they pray in front of the Western Wall, in Jerusalem's Old City, during the mass priestly blessing on the pilgrimage holiday of Passover.

The priestly blessing is know in Hebrew as Birkat Kohanim or as 'the raising of the hands' (Hebrew: nesiat kapayim), or 'Dukhanen' (from the Hebrew word dukhan - platform - because the blessing is given from a raised rostrum).

The Priestly Blessing consists of the following Biblical verses (Numbers 6:24–26): May the LORD bless you and guard you - May the LORD make His face shed light upon you and be gracious unto you - May the LORD lift up His face unto you and give you peace.

Jews from all over Israel and the world come on the pilgrimage festivals to take part in the mass Birkat Kohanim.

Jews stand on the Mount of Olives overlooking the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem and gaze towards the Temple Mount, where two temples stood and were destroyed. Jews pray for the reestablishment of a third temple in the same place.

The Mamilla open-air mall stands adjacent to the western entrance of Jerusalem's Old City at Jaffa Gate. In a few short years since its establishment, it has become a popular shopping and dining destination. It was packed on the day of the Priestly Blessing of Passover 5772.

After the Priestly Blessing the Sephardic Chief Rabbi Shlomo Amar welcomes worshipers at the Western Wall in Jerusalem and blessed them himself.

 

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/photos/photo-essay-priestly-blessings-and-jerusalem-pilgrimage-5772/2012/04/09/

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