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April 19, 2014 / 19 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘privacy’

Security Agencies Believe Israel’s Biometric Database Not Secure

Monday, March 3rd, 2014

Mossad, Shabak, and certain IDF officers have been ordered to avoid participation in the biometric ID “Smart Teudat Zehut” program that is currently under trial and being pushed onto unsuspecting citizens in Israel.

Israel’s security forces strongly believe that the biometric database is not sufficiently secure, according to a report in Haaretz.

But one doesn’t need to be a secret agent to worry about this program.

Private citizens should also be concerned about who will have access to their biometric and personal data, whether deliberately or accidentally, and how that data will be used and connected up with other database information, to track the activities of average citizens.

MK Moshe Feiglin (Likud) has been saying for months now that the new biometric database is bad news for Israelis.

In an article he published in The Jewish Press more than a year ago, Guard our Freedom: Beware the Biometric Law, MK Feiglin noted that the possibility of breaking into the ID database is simply too strong a temptation for powerful interest groups and tycoons, who are sure to find a way to get to this data.

“We’re giving the State unlimited abilities to control and manage civilian life,” Feiglin warned in a press interview recently. “We’re talking about being biometrically marked. If we were offered to be marked on our forehead we would refuse. We’d also refuse a tattoo on our ear, but when the tattoo is transparent we agree.”

“People can lose their liberty without feeling a thing,” he cautions. “So guard it with the greatest vigilance and do not give anyone your biometric information.”

Israel’s Supermodel Bar Rafaeli Wins $113,000 in Samsung Lawsuit

Thursday, October 17th, 2013

Even Israeli supermodel Bar Rafaeli has a right to privacy, and even Samsung does not have the right to invade it, a Tel Aviv court ruled Wednesday in a decision that will cost Samsung nearly $160,000.

Samsung’s Israeli importer Suny Electronics went ahead and used online broadcasts of her in its advertising campaign in 2006 but without her knowledge.

She sued for violations of her rights of privacy. It’s one thing to go on the air, but it is another matter to take the conversation and use it for a commercial campaign without a person’s knowledge, let alone permission.

Samsung decided to go head-to-head and battle it out in the court and even sued Bar Rafaeli for libel for writing to Samsung’s office in Korea about the misuse.

Tel Aviv District Court Judge Avi Zamir decided in her favor and ordered Samsung to fork over $113,400 to Bar Rafaeli  plus another $42,000 to cover court costs.

He threw out the libel suit but also dismissed the supermodel’s claim for personal damages from a market consultant, Globes reported.

“The image of models, their voices, bodies, and names are their personal assets, and no one has the right to use them for commercial purposes without their consent and without compensation,” Judge Zamir ruled.

He added, “These assets have the right to be protected. Every model, male or female, even if they chose to reveal themselves in an advertisement, even the broadest and most exposing, in any media, has the right not to have use made of these private assets beyond what was agreed, and without their explicit consent.

“Even deviations from existing agreements over the extent of the permitted use of these assets, damage them, damage that justifies financial compensation.”

Considering that Bar Rafaeli is a good sell for anything from apples to zebras, Samsung may have gotten more than its money’s worth for the free use of her conversations.

An Even More Centralized Israel: Cashless and Criminal

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013

Centralization in Israel is a two-headed coin (or perhaps a two-headed monster).

There’s no doubt, that so many bureaucratic activities go much smoother in Israel than they do in America, because we have ID numbers and our cards are inter-linked to everything. Of course, sometimes that doubles the frustration when obvious things need to be manually duplicated over and over for no reason.

On the other hand, that centralization provides no flexibility or a safety net. Having problems with one government office can easily spill over to an unrelated one, since you’re linked together everywhere on record.

Then there is the basic issue of personal privacy and civil liberties.

And now, the Israeli government is attempting to implement two extreme decisions that threaten civil liberties more than ever.

They’re testing a biometric ID system. God forbid that should ever become mandatory.

Right now, even though your personal bio-data is out there with different organizations, there is still some semblance of privacy and protection because of the separation that naturally exists between your health fund, the army, the government, and so on.

But once that goes away, there goes your privacy. You will have no control over your personal information at all, and you’re reliant on the government, which as we know, is not the most effective of protectors of personal data.

The other move is even scarier.

The Israeli government is actually considering trying to find a way to abolish cash.

There was a unanimous cabinet decision to explore how to do that (Hey Naftali Bennett, I didn’t vote for you to lose my civil liberties – remember that come election time).

They want to get rid of cash, and give everyone rechargeable “cash cards” that will allow the government to track every single transaction you do. EVERY. SINGLE. TRANSACTION.

I can’t even begin to describe the civil liberties and privacy violations that implementing this system will create.

And if they actually believe this will get rid of cash, or the black market, they’re even stupider than I thought.

Bitcoin, gold, barter… you name it. Smart (and dumb) people will find their way around it. Not to do illegal transactions, mind you, but simply to protect their privacy away from the government’s snooping eyes.

And then we’ll all be criminals, because of a dangerous legislation which is an intrusive attempt to suck more tax money out of us and spy on us, and not just spy directly, but with data mining too, to study our purchase and transaction behavior, and find every last penny they can suck out of us and understand what we do with it.

I guarantee one thing. If this legislation passes, if the party I voted for, and the ones I didn’t, don’t stop this in its tracks, I will do everything (legal) to make sure those people do not get elected again, and be replaced with people who do care and understand the importance of civil liberties and fear the tyranny of government.

Palestinian Hacker Posts on Marc Zuckerberg’s Facebook Wall

Tuesday, August 20th, 2013

A Palestinian hacker posted a message on Facebook founder Marc Zuckerberg’s wall to show there is a bug in the social network’s security settings.

Khalil Shreateh of Hebron posted information about the bug on Zuckerberg’s wall late last week, following unsuccessful attempts to report the bug to Facebook security. The bug allowed Shreateh to post on the walls of other members despite security settings.

“Sorry for breaking your privacy … I had no other choice … after all the reports I sent to Facebook team,” Shreateh wrote on Zuckerberg’s wall.

Facebook security had denied that the flaw was a bug.

Shreateh, who is unemployed, had hoped to win a $500 reward paid out to hackers who discover bugs on Facebook. Instead, his Facebook account was frozen, since he violated Facebook’s terms of service by posting illegally on Zuckerberg’s page. His account has since been reinstated.

Zuckerberg has 18 million friends on his Facebook page.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/palestinian-hacker-posts-on-marc-zuckerbergs-facebook-wall/2013/08/20/

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