web analytics
April 18, 2014 / 18 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Rabbi Steinsaltz’

Talmudic, Tenacious, Tough-Minded: An Interview With Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz

Wednesday, June 20th, 2012

Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz is quite the accomplished personality. The author of over 60 books, Rabbi Steinsaltz has also translated the entire Talmud into Hebrew, a project he started in 1965 at the age of 28 and took 45 years to complete. To date, over two million copies of the Steinsaltz Talmud – in Hebrew, English, French, and Russian – have been sold. No wonder Time magazine once dubbed him a “once-in-a-millennium scholar.”

Last month, Rabbi Steinsaltz’s career hit another high as Koren Publishers Jerusalem released the first volume of its English translation of the Steinsaltz Talmud. From 1989-1999, Random House published four masechtot of the Steinsaltz Talmud in English, but then stopped. Koren Publishers has now stepped into the breach.

The new English edition features color illustrations, vowelized and punctuated Gemara pages, and Koren’s signature aesthetic touch. According to Rabbi Tzvi Hersh Weinreb, the project’s editor-in-chief, the entire set of 41 volumes is scheduled to be published within the next four years. A Steinsaltz Talmud iPad app will also be available soon.

The Jewish Press recently spoke with Rabbi Steinsaltz about the new translation, his background, and various controversies that have surrounded him and his work.

The Jewish Press: Why should someone buy the Steinsaltz Talmud over ArtScroll’s immensely popular Shas?

Rabbi Steinsaltz: Look, it’s not the same. I would put it in the following way: When you learn from my Gemara, I hope that you get a kick to learn further, and that you don’t feel that you know everything and that all the problems are answered.

Does the ArtScroll Shas not do that as well?

I think ArtScroll gives too much in a way. Everything is in there. I’m trying to have it in a way that you study and want more.

Basically I want, not just that you will look at the Gemara, but that you will get involved in it. You cannot learn Gemara completely passively. You have to be a participant.

There are two parts to what Hillel HaZaken said about kol haTorah kulah. One part is always quoted – “What you don’t want done to you, don’t do to others.” But the other part – “And all the rest go and learn” – is no less important.

I hope to have people who will learn and say, “We want to know more, we have more questions.”

You started translating Shas into Hebrew at the age of 28. What led you to embark on this enormous project and what gave you the confidence that you’d be able to do it?

For the first part of the question, I will just tell you it’s what makes people want to climb Mount Everest – the mountain is there, the challenge is there, and the need is there. So you do it.

[In terms of being able to translate Shas], I thought at the time, and other people thought as well, that I was able to do it. Hopefully I didn’t disappoint.

Were you scared of embarking on such a major project at such a young age?

Well, I’m not a scared person – not of bullets and not of ideas.

But why assume such a major undertaking?

Because the Talmud is the central pillar of Judaism, and if the central pillar is not at hand for most people, they miss something very important. The Talmud was, in so many ways, a closed book for many people – so I tried to open it.

In the original editions of the Steinsaltz Talmud, you changed the traditional look – the tzuras hadaf – of the pages, for which you were heavily criticized. For the new edition of the Hebrew and English Steinsaltz Talmud, however, you restored the old look. Why did you originally change it and why did you restore it?

Look, in the beginning, it just couldn’t be done. All the additional material couldn’t be put on the old pages. I tried twenty-odd formats, and found out that if I used the traditional page, it would be at least two and a half times as big, which wouldn’t be usable. So the question is: What do you do – duplicate the page as ArtScroll did or cut it?

What I originally did in my Hebrew Gemaras was cut it. About 150 years ago in Poland, an edition with exactly the same kind of half pages was published. They made notes about why this was needed and [said] there was nothing holy about the other format. The traditional page is after all just a page. Even sifrei Torah can be written in different ways; surely Gemaras can be done differently too.

Title: The Miracle of The Seventh Day

Friday, August 1st, 2003

Title: The Miracle of The Seventh Day
Author: Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz
Publisher: Jossey-Bass Pub., A Wiley Imprint, San Francisco, CA


The sub-title is of The Miracle of the Seventh Day is A Guide to the Spiritual Meaning, Significance and Weekly Practice of the Jewish Sabbath, written by Rabbi Steinsaltz, a leader among the activists of the Kiruv movement, this very attractively published volume is designed to be a working tool toward assisting the newly initiated toward understanding the hidden meanings of prayer.

The Miracle of The Seventh Day is not a siddur, or prayer book, but a guide toward Jewish custom in the home, beginning with the lighting of Shabbos candles, Kiddush, Birchat Hamazon (grace following meals), Melava Malkah (escorting the Sabbath Queen), etc. As with almost all his writings, Rabbi Steinsaltz writes in clear, reasoned exposition, demonstrating his basic value as a teacher – and instructor – to the newly initiated, as well as an expositor of the many hidden meanings to those who may feel familiar with liturgy and custom.

Each section begins with Rabbi Steinsaltz’ introduction, assisting our entry (or re-entry) into the “World of Sabbath.” We have many Minhagim (customs) and Halakhot (laws) that we observe to enhance the reality of the experience of the Jewish Sabbath, which is not merely a day of rest – but a day of renewal and inspiration.

Each prayer or blessing includes a modern Ivrit transliteration printed in English, line for line, and the entire volume is printed in an unusual format that makes it quite compact (easy to lay on the table along-side meals). The typography, including both a modern Hebrew typeface, as
well as the English, is quite attractive, and printed on very good quality, acid-free paper stock, smythe-sewn bound to lay perfectly flat when opened to any particular page. That the title page says this is “An Arthur Kurzweil Book” is indicative of the exceptional work of this well-known exponent of better Judaica publication.

Rabbi Jonathan Chipman, and Yehudit Shabtai performed the wonderfully reflective translation (from the original written in Lashon Kodesh). 

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/title-the-miracle-of-the-seventh-day/2003/08/01/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: