web analytics
September 18, 2014 / 23 Elul, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘rabin’

Who Said, ‘I Oppose the Creation of a Palestinian State’?

Monday, January 7th, 2013

Quiz: Who is the “I” in this headline in Time Magazine?

“I Oppose the Creation of a Palestinian State”

Answer: Yitzchak Rabin in an interview in Time Magazine:

I Oppose the Creation of a Palestinian State
By Lisa Beyer/Tel Aviv and Yitzhak Rabin
Monday, Sept. 27, 1993

Q. Now that you’ve signed this agreement with the Palestinians, what next?
A. For me, the main test is the implementation, especially in Gaza. Jericho is symbolic. In Gaza there are three-quarters of a million Palestinians, poverty, economic and social problems. The real problem is to what extent the P.L.O. will have the means to take over. They have never been responsible for running a large community — to maintain law and order, to prevent terror, to run an economy, to build houses, to run schools, to develop industries. The whole future depends on how it works in Gaza-Jericho.
Q. How do you think the Palestinians will manage self-rule?
A. I believe there is a good chance they will succeed. But without a tremendous amount of money from the outside, I don’t see great hope that they will manage even in Gaza.
Q. How do you assess the security risks to Israel?
A. The Palestinians don’t present militarily a threat to the existence of Israel. There are certain risks to the personal security of a limited number of Israelis.
Q. What if the personal-security risks to Israelis increase?
A. If terror will continue, it means the Palestinians cannot keep their commitments, so what is the meaning of the agreement?
Q. In that case the accord would be rolled back?
A. I didn’t say so. You said it.
Q. How will your government respond if the right wing in Israel rebels against the accord?
A. I don’t believe that there will be rebellion. Israel is a democracy. There might be expressions of opposition, but I believe that whatever the government and Knesset approve will be carried out.
Q. What about rebellion against the Palestinian authorities?
A. No doubt they’ll have problems, mainly with Hamas. They will focus on increased terror activities against Israelis. They believe that the best way to foil the deal is to create antagonism to the agreement among the Israelis. We had lately suicide terror acts. It creates problems.
Q. The Labor Party seems to be softening its opposition to a Palestinian state.
A. No. I am against this. I oppose the creation of an independent Palestinian state between Israel and Jordan, and I don’t believe that at this stage it would be a good idea if I brought out the options.
Q. How will the accord affect your negotiations with Syria, Lebanon and Jordan?
A. We expect the other partners in the peace negotiations to assist in the implementation of what has been agreed upon with the Palestinians. Idon’t see a problem signing a peace treaty with Jordan tomorrow if they limit the issues to Jordanian-Israeli problems. It will facilitate negotiations with Syria, but maybe on a longer timetable.
Q. When you shook Arafat’s hand in Washington, you managed a smile. Or was it a grimace?
A. I can’t remember. I stood there for about one hour. Do you expect me to remember every expression that I had?
Q. It must have been a memorable moment. How did you feel?
A. It was not easy.
Q. What made you decide finally to deal directly with the P.L.O.?
A. It took me and others a long time to overcome the mental and practical block to this. For 30 years the P.L.O. carried out terror activities, among them many cases I can call atrocities. But mutual recognition, in my humble opinion — to the extent that they will keep their commitment, and I assume they will — made the P.L.O. entirely different from what it was before.
Q. You are 71 years old, late in your political career. Did this motivate you to reach a solution now?
A. It is not a question of my age but a question of my purpose in being in politics. When I decided to run for Prime Minister, I believed that the coincidence of events on the international scene, in the Middle East, in Israel were ripe to achieve two goals: peace and security, and changing the order of national priorities for the people of Israel — not to look at the territories as the main issue. At least 96% of Israeli Jews live on sovereign Israeli soil, within the green lines, including united Jerusalem. The future of Israel depends much more on what that 96% of Jews and about 1 million non-Jewish Israeli citizens will achieve in their economy, social progress, cultural and scientific achievements.

How right he was – and how wrong.

Visit My Right Word.

Shas Gonna Shas

Monday, January 7th, 2013

“Haters gonna hate,” the saying goes. Ditto for political parties.

On January 3, Ynet reported about a Shas event held in the Arab Galileevillage of Abu Sanan. Aryeh Deri mentioned feeling at home and told his audience, “You will have someone to turn to and our respect.” Eli Yishai likewise stated, “Inshallah, God willing, we will have our victory party right here.”

This should be as surprising as reading that Meretz members advocate public transportation on Shabbat. Does Shas greasing the rails for Oslo I by abstention ring a bell? How about the coalition Shas formed with Meretz and Labor in 1992 to enable Rabin’s government?

It wasn’t out of the blue that Rabbi Aaron Rakeffet-Rothkoff said in 2010, “Any commitment of Shas to Torat HaShem Temima is purely coincidental at best… A vote for Shas is a vote to give back the Kotel” (See 28:45 here.)

Rabbi David Bar-Hayim has commented on Shas and Oslo I: “They allowed it to take place because they did nothing…They did nothing because they were paid off. This is a clear-cut, simple, straightforward case of shochad…” (See 1:19:50 here.)

But the problem isn’t just Shas. Before the establishment of this party, the Lubavitcher Rebbe zt”l likewise stated regarding the Camp David Accords:

What’s most distressing is that the voices that should have been raised in opposition have been   silenced by bribes. Those who have accepted the bribes may protest the money has gone to Yeshivos, etc. However, no money that is stained with Jewish blood can help in the education of    a Jewish child.

These words remain all too timely, as do those of Rabbi Meir Kahane hy”d in 1981:

Years of a National Religious Party holding the balance of power in the government and doing    nothing as it supped happily at the tables of money and power. Almost four years of an Agudat Yisrael party, which is quite happy to support Begin in return for money for its institutions and yeshivot.

Specific to Rabbi Kahane’s points, Rabbi Rakeffets remarked on various occasions from 2005 and 2012 about the destruction of Gush Katif, the empowerment of Hamas, and the complicity of Agudat Yisrael:

* “You open up The Jewish Press, Menachem Porush is crying and yelling and shouting…against the disengagement. You phony. You falsifier. You liar. Your own party is sitting in the government and giving them a majority and enabling them to do what they want, and you’re crying in The Jewish Press. And people are so stupid. They read it and follow it and think Torah Mi Sinai. (See 28:55 here.)

* “Every rocket falling in on Israel today—Agudat Yisrael, the Gerrer Rebbe, has a share in it.” (See 8:50 here.)

* “…a Moetzet Gedolei HaTorah that enabled the Israeli government to give back Gush Katif and bring endless tragedy upon the Jewish People…Agudat Yisrael made it possible. I lived it. I saw it. It was tangible. Everyone knows about it…The price we are paying, the price we have paid, and the price we will yet pay for the stupidity of Agudat Yisrael that enabled the Israeli government to go along with Sharon and Olmert. It’s overwhelming.” (See 1:05:35 here.)

Likud-Beiteinu Leader: I Oppose a Palestinian State

Sunday, January 6th, 2013

The idea that a Palestinian state can lead to enduring peace in Israel has become a diplomatic obsession for Israeli and American policy makers. Ironically, it was former Prime Minister Yitzchak Rabin who was in favor of territorial compromise but opposed a Palestinian state. Despite this, establishing such a state has become the equivalent of a “Messiah” that will bring the long awaited peace to the region. President Shimon Peres declared that there is a majority that supports a two state solution. Such a declaration shows that the President is not updated because a recent poll by Mina Tzemach proves just the opposite namely there is a solid majority in Israel against a Palestinian state.

The fact of the matter is that a Palestinian state would not only fail to bring peace and stability to the region, but would increase the tension and usher in permanent instability to the region. Such a state would immediately ally itself with and become a client of rivals and enemies of America such as Iran, would harm American, Israeli, and even Arab interests. A Palestinian State would be a tailwind to insurgent terrorists in Iraq. It would provide Russia and possibly China and North Korea with a foothold in the eastern flank of the Mediterranean at the expense of vital US interests.

The history of the PA’s Abu Mazen tells us something important about the likely character of a Palestinian state. Abu Mazen who will be heading this state is afraid to call for elections in the Palestinian Authority out of fear that Hamas would gain control. In other words, he lacks public support even now. Besides that, he is a graduate of Moscow University (Ph.D. thesis: Holocaust Denial) and it was he who managed the logistics of the Munich Massacre of eleven Israeli athletes in 1972. Abu Mazen is one of the engineers of contemporary Palestinian hate education, which has become a production line for terrorists.

This history is not that of a peace maker, and the PLO’s track record of inter-Arab treachery, non-compliance, corruption, repression and terrorism does not give evidence of a peaceful Palestinian state of the future. Since its makeover from a terrorist organization to a semi-independent entity in 1993, the Palestinian Authority, is led by PLO graduates of terrorist bases in Iraq, Libya, Yemen, Sudan, Lebanon, Syria and Tunisia

The proposed Palestinian State would inflict destruction upon America’s Arab allies and would enhance the fortunes of its rivals and enemies. Other states in the region know this. During the October 1994 signing of the Israel-Jordan peace treaty, top commanders of the Jordanian military urged their Israeli counterparts to stop short of a Palestinian state west of the Jordan River, “lest it destroy the [pro-US] Hashemite regime east of the River.”

Even more worrisome are the ties between the PLO and Iran. The PLO was one of the earliest allies of the Ayatollah Khomeini when he toppled the Shah of Iran in 1979. After his 2005 election to the chairmanship of the Palestinian Authority, Abu Mazen’s first visits were to Teheran and Damascus. A Palestinian state would extend Iran’s long terrorist arm, facilitating subversive operations against pro-Western Arab regimes. It would also enable Iran to enhance its intelligence and military operations in the region, including port facilities in Gaza.

The long and determined effort by Israeli leaders to promote a Palestinian state and to soften the Palestinian Authority’s harsh features cannot change the fact that a Palestinian State would add fuel to the fire of terrorism in the region. Besides all that, it is not hard to forsee rockets flying into Israel from Judea and Samaria as they did after the disengagement from Gaza in the south. In summation: we must remove the idea of a Palestinian state in our area from the Israeli agenda immediately if not sooner.

Observing Shabbat Worldwide to Protect Israel

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

“Just as Shabbat has kept the Jews throughout the generations, Shabbat has also kept us.”  A 28-year-old man who left Chicago three years ago to make Israel his home, is, therefore, turning to Shabbat to unify those who wish to spiritually protect the Jewish nation.

In 2005, Yosef Meir Rabin served with Israel’s Defense Forces as part of the Machal, or Overseas Volunteer unit.  Now he’s an Israeli, an observant Jew and someone who takes to heart what he hears from his rabbis.

On Sunday, November 18,  Rabin joined thousands of others in Jerusalem at the kotel.  They were there to pray for the safety of Israel’s soldiers in their fight against Gaza terrorists in Operation Pillar of Defense.  In addition to other prayers, they said slichot, prayers typically recited as we approach the high Holy Days.  The prayer for the safety of Israel’s soldiers was also recited.

The Sephardic Chief Rabbi of Israel, Shlomo Amar, encouraged everyone to keep Shabbat, especially at this time.  Rabin repeated Rabbi Amar’s words to The Jewish Press, “Shabbat is the greatest spiritual connection.”

The next day, Yosef kept playing over in his mind the words he had heard, and the special prayers that were said at the Kotel.  He decided to include those who weren’t able to join him, to amplify the powerful words spoken there, and to spiritually connect all lovers of Israel with a day focused on the safety of the Jewish nation’s citizens and soldiers.

Rabin took a simple idea and is sharing it with the world.  Or at least those on Facebook.  He created a Facebook page for a United Shabbat, on which he has asked people to commit to spending this Shabbat thinking about and praying for the safety of Israel. People are asked to refrain from all the 39 forbidden Shabbat activities, and to instead spend the 25 hour with friends and family eating, singing and praying for the welfare of the IDF and of our Jewish nation.  All non-Jewish supporters of Israel are invited to join in by praying for and thinking about the health and safety of Israel and the IDF.

Rabin told The Jewish Press that “just as the Jews have kept Shabbat throughout the generations, the Shabbat has also kept us. It is, as our Sages teach, ‘A source of Blessing.’  With this in mind, the 25 hours of Shabbat beginning on Friday, November 23 will be a Global United Shabbat.

A link is provided on the Worldwide Shabbat page so that folks anywhere in the world can find out where Shabbat begins in their location.  And the Hebrew language, transliteration and English translation of the prayers for the IDF are also on the page.

Rabin said he “hopes this United Shabbat will bring together the Jewish Nation and bring great spiritual protection to our endangered brothers and sisters, and of course our holy Soldiers who bravely stand guard on our nation and land.”

The page was launched on Monday, November 20, and several hundred people have already signed on.  Anyone who wants to join in should go to the Facebook page, “Worldwide Shabbat Observance for the Protection of Israeli Soldiers and Citizens.”  Of course it isn’t necessary to go to the Facebook page, but, as Rabin noted, “it will provide a sense of community and solidarity.”

Two Very Different Jews Memorialized on Saturday

Sunday, October 28th, 2012

Memorials for two memorable Jews took place this weekend, though they stood, perhaps, on opposite sides of the political spectrum.

The Matriarch Rachel, wife of the Patriarch Jacob and mother to biblical figures Joseph and Benjamin, was remembered on the 11th of the Jewish month of Cheshvan, being visited by a reported 70,000+ of her and her husband’s descendants.  Jews from all over Israel and all walks of life came on Friday and Saturday night to pay their respects to the beloved matriarch, who is considered to be the mother of aliyah, said to be weeping for her exiled children by the prophet Jeremiah.

On Saturday night, a somewhat different Jew was also remembered, albeit by a significantly smaller and less pious crowd.  Less than 25,000 people gathered in Tel Aviv on Saturday night to remember former Prime Minister Yitzchak Rabin.  Less a celebration of his life and accomplishments than a nostalgic gathering for Oslo and reflection on his murder, the Rabin memorial this year was themed “Remembering the Murder: Fighting for Democracy”.

Special Report: Bibi Outmaneuvered Obama, Funded Settlements After Freeze

Monday, July 30th, 2012

Though the government of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu instituted an unprecedented 10 month building freeze in Judea and Samaria due to pressure by the US beginning in November 2009, an Israeli business newspaper report shows that financial support for Jewish communities leaped a whopping 38% the following year.

According to the report by Israel’s Calcalist newspaper, the Israeli government invested NIS 10 billion in Jewish life in the biblical heartland to the north and south of Jerusalem between 2003 and 2011. This amount includes the total government investment: financial support to local authorities, cross-investment in infrastructure and lost revenue to the state as a result of tax benefits. In fact, this amount should include all but defense spending on security in the communities, information about which has not been released to the public.

Under Prime Minister Yitzchak Rabin, government investment in Judea and Samaria reached perhaps its largest levels, with the government in 1993 earmarking 60%of its NIS 2.5 million Judea and Samaria budget on construction alone.  The funding was distributed the same year as the signing of the Oslo Accords.

From 1994-1997, investment took a hit, with governmental investment dropping to just over  1.5 billion annually, and then rose again in 2003 to 2.1 billion, only to begin sinking again.

In 2005, with the announcement of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s unilateral withdrawal from the Jewish Gush Katif communities of Gaza, funding took a nose dive.  For the next four years, during the term of Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, residents of Judea and Samaria saw a paltry NIS 805 million per year put back into their towns.

Following the second inauguration of Prime Minister Netanyahu, funding to Judea and Samaria began to rise again.  In 2010, an additional 41 million shekels was added to the budget for the region, then an additional NIS 254 million in 2011, an increase of 38% in a year when the whole government budget was raised by just 2.7%, and a return to the levels of investment made prior to the Gaza withdrawal.

According to the report, the education budget for Judea and Samaria grew 272% from 2003 to 2011, and the Yesha Council –  an umbrella organization of municipal councils of Jewish communities in Judea and Samaria – stated that the number of Jews in the communities grew by 5% every one of those years, with 345 to 360 thousand Jews living in the region, not including eastern Jerusalem.  The Yesha Council was quoted as saying that in the Binyamin Regional Council alone, infrastructure, schools and transportation were needed for an additional 10-15% growth in the number of children entering the first grade.

An official of the organization praised the government for creating a more positive atmosphere in regard to Judea and Samaria, but said that the region received no special benefits other than a reduced cost of public transportation.

While some say the Prime Minister Netanyahu’s personal politics are responsible for the increase in budget numbers, others note that the 18 percent growth Judea and Samaria has experienced in the last three years is attributable to the high birth rate, and say the increase in budget is commensurate with the needs of the growing population.

In 2010, Haaretz reported that security sources publicized 28 incidents of building freeze violations, just 4 months into the measure, including in Tekoa, Psago, Emanuel, Kedumim, Beitar Illit, Maale Adumim and Kfar Etzion.  Radical anti-Judea and Samaria development group Peace Now alleged that building on 600 new homes was begun in over 60 communities, a little over what would be built if the freeze had not been instituted.

That same month, MK Danny Danon of the prime minister’s Likud party initiated a bill to compensate residents of Judea and Samaria who suffered losses as a result of the construction freeze.

Though funding for Judea and Samaria is less than half of what it was under Prime Minister Rabin, and given the controversial settlement between the Netanyahu government and the residents of the Ulpana in Beit El, in which residents agreed to peacefully leave their homes the Ulpana mountain in exchange for the promise of 300 new homes in the town following a court case asserting Palestinian ownership of the Ulpana land in the Supreme Court, many view the administration of Netanyahu as pro-Judea and Samaria.  Under his watch, the college in the Samarian city of Ariel received university status, and the Edmund Levy report was celebrated as a major victory in the battle to assert full Israeli sovereignty in all areas in which Israelis make their homes, including Judea, Samaria, and the Golan.

Mordechai Kedar: The Failure of the Palestinian Venture

Monday, April 23rd, 2012

Lately, there have been many rumors circulating about the intentions of the Palestinians, specifically Abu Mazen, to dismantle the Palestinian Authority and return to the pre-Oslo days, when Israel was responsible for all of the territories of Judea and Samaria, including the Arab cities. About one month ago, in March 2012, a conference including Egyptian and Palestinian notables convened in Cairo, and discussed this as a serious possibility, “because at present there is no political solution on the horizon.” The questions that the conference dealt with were: who has the authority to implement a decision to disband the PA, and whether the advantages of such a move would outweigh the disadvantages. According to the participants, the PA has failed because it has not achieved a full Israeli withdrawal from all of the territories “occupied” in 1967, and has failed to impose the refugees’ “right of return” upon Israel.

Ibrahim Hamami, head of the Center for Palestinian Affairs in London, who participated in the conference, stated: “The Palestinian Authority was established to serve the goals of the occupation by continuing negotiations, while the Palestinian citizen did not benefit from it at all. On the contrary: it was the Palestinians who were forced to withdraw because of the settlement activity and roadblocks. An additional reason to dismantle the PA is the Israeli “fear of deterioration in security that will occur in Israel because of the absence of Palestinian security organizations.” By saying it, Hamami implies that the whole raison d’être of the PA security organizations is to foster Israel’s security, and thus undermines the legitimacy of the existence of the PA. Hamami claims that six years ago, in 2006, Abbas had already hinted at the possibility of dismantling the PA after Israel broke into the Jericho prison and arrested Ahmed Sadat and his associates. Since then, the possibility of dismantling the PA has arisen from time to time, when Abbas has become frustrated with Israel.

As a result, Palestinian spokesmen have it easy: they just have to blame Israel for their failure. It’s convenient and it provides an explanation that the West will buy, because it doesn’t have a deep understanding of the problems of the Middle East in general, and the Israeli-Palestinian issue in particular. The truth of the matter is, there never was a chance for the Palestinian Authority to succeed, because of the innate problems that flow from the nature of the political culture of the Middle East. We will focus on a few of them:

1. The fundamental problem of any modern Arab state is the problem of its legitimacy to exist as a state, principally because the state does not reflect a well-defined ethnic unit, and therefore is not a nation-state in the European sense, e.g. France and Holland. Traditionally, there is no “Syrian people”, “Jordanian people”, “Lebanese people”, or “Sudanese people”. There is an “Arab people”, which is divided into tribes, clans, religious groups, and sects. Arab states such as Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, and Sudan are creations of colonialism, which was responsible for the arbitrary division of the Arab nation, without regard to demographic facts. The PA suffers from this problem too, because – traditionally – there was never a “Palestinian People”, and there is no trace of such an entity in any book or newspaper that was printed before 1920 – before the area of “Sham” (Greater Syria) was divided into four political units: Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, and Palestine-Israel.

2. Most of the members of the “Palestinian People”, the virtual collective upon which the idea of a Palestinian state is supposed to be built, are descendants of immigrants that entered the area between the Mediterranean Sea and the Jordan River during the second half of the 19th century and the twentieth century. The Ottoman Empire, the British Mandate, and the Jewish villages that were established in pre-state Israel were an attractive source of livelihood for the immigrant workers, who came from the surrounding areas. Many Egyptians fled to Israel in the 1860s in order to escape forced labor – digging the Suez Canal. Therefore even today, many “Palestinians” have names such as “Al-Masri” (The Egyptian), “Masarwa” (Egyptians), and “Fayoumi”, names which point to their Egyptian origin. Others are called “Al-Haurani”, because they were brought by the British from the Hauran, in Syria, principally to work in the port of Haifa. The inhabitants of the village of Jisr al-Zarqa are Sudanese, and therefore they did not participate in the 1948 War of Independence and remained in the place where they settled, between Caesaria and Ma’agan Michael. European geographers who visited the Land of Israel in the 19th century, as well as the international investigative committees which operated during the first half of the twentieth century, documented groups of immigrants from Iran, Afghanistan, Yemen, Iraq, North Africa, and the Balkans, who were residing in Israel. Residents of Rehania and Kfar Kama, two Galilee villages, are Cherkessian from the Caucasus. The Booshank clan, which lives in Kfar Manda, came from Bosnia. All of the residents of the Negev, most of the residents of the Gaza Strip, and some from Mount Hebron are Bedouins, who for centuries wandered between the deserts of Sinai, the Negev, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia. Their Saudi Arabian dialect clearly testifies to their country of origin. Some of the Armenians – who are Christian – fled to Israel from Turkey in the years 1915-1918, because of the genocide the Turks were perpetrating against them. Therefore, “Palestinians” are mostly a mixed people, various groups whose origin is not the Land of Israel.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/analysis/dr-mordechai-kedar/mordechai-kedar-the-failure-of-the-palestinian-venture/2012/04/23/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: