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May 22, 2015 / 4 Sivan, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘RAID’

Arab ‘Day of Mourning’ in Negev Bedouin Schools

Monday, January 19th, 2015

A man in his 40s – the second victim since last Wednesday — has died following a riot at a funeral and general strike by Arab business owners and Negev Bedouin schools in Israel.

The man, a Bedouin, was in his 40s. He was allegedly participating in a riot against Israeli police following the funeral held for a man who was shot by police last Wednesday.

The strike Sunday was held to mourn 21-year-old Sami al-Ajar, a resident of Rahat, the largest Bedouin city in Israel. After his funeral Sunday, more than two dozen people were wounded, including one seriously. Two police officers were hurt, one in serious condition.

The violence began late last Wednesday with a raid by police who came to Rahat to execute a search warrant on a suspected drug house.

Police were attacked by a mob that gathered to hurl rocks, bottles and other objects at the officers.

Police initially used standard crowd-dispersal methods to control the mob, but as things spiraled out of control, they fired into the air to protect themselves and their two prisoners, they said. Al-Ajar was shot in the melee.

2 Dead in Belgium Counter Terror Raid

Thursday, January 15th, 2015

At least two people are reported dead following a counterterrorism raid in eastern Belgium, according to RTBF, the Belgian public television station.

A third person was seriously wounded in the shootout, which took place in Verviers, the British Telegraph reported.

It is not clear whether the casualties are terror suspects or security personnel. Verviers is a city about 70 miles from Brussels with a population of 55,000.

Federal prosecutors in the country told media a police operation was in process near the center of town but did not confirm casualties. The Belga news agency reported that police activity was continuing in the area.

The alleged terrorists had reportedly returned recently from Syria, according to Belga.

In another part of Belgium, a man suspected of selling the weapons used in last week’s terror attacks in France is also being detained, according to Fox News.

The suspect is being held in Carleroi on suspicion of arms dealing, said a spokesperson for Belgium’s federal prosecution. “Further investigations will have to show whether there is a link with the events in Paris,” he said.

Belgian media reported the suspect turned himself in on Tuesday, saying he had been in contact with Amedy Coulibaly. The ISIS terrorist murdered a French policewoman last Thursday and held more than a dozen people hostage at the Hyper Cacher kosher grocery in Paris, killing four, before he was shot and killed by security forces as they stormed the site at the start of the Sabbath at sunset Friday.

Weapons, Ammo Seized Near Ma’ale Adumim

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

The guardians of Israel do not sleep . . .

Israeli security and police officers tracked down and seized weapons and ammunition in the Arab village of Azaria overnight, in the wee hours of Monday morning. The village is located next to Ma’ale Adumim, a large Jerusalem suburb.

Two unregistered guns with three cartridges and around two hundred 9mm bullets were discovered during the search carried out in a joint raid by Israeli intelligence personnel and Border Police, the 0404 website reported.

One suspect was arrested and taken into custody for questioning at the Ma’ale Adumim police station.

Police Arrested 20 Islamists Following Toulouse Murders, Terrorist Network May Be Shut Down

Friday, March 30th, 2012

French elite police units, including the same RAID unit that took 32 hours to spray Toulouse gunman Merah with bullets, have now taken the initiative, and early Friday morning arrested some 20 Islamist militants, including a few in Toulouse.

RAID carried out the arrests in Toulouse in the southwest, Nantes and Le Mans in western France, as well as in the Paris region.

The obvious question is: seriously? A week later, and only twenty bad guys are under arrest?

Americans, Israelis, let’s face it, Mankind, are happy to make fun of the French when it comes to military and police capability. They make fantastic cheese and wine, goes the generally accepted notion, but when it comes to security we’d all prefer to be watched over by Navy Seals or Israeli Commandos.

That general notion is more than a bit unfair, but all of us are not eager to be confused with the facts when it comes to evaluating the French.

Our prejudices were only reinforced by the performance of the elite RAID unit in Toulouse. Last week, Christian Prouteau, founder of the GIGN, an elite French police unit that was not part of the Toulouse failure, questioned the way the operation had been carried out. He asked why RAID had not utilized tear gas and other measures to disable Merah, and said he was surprised that after so many hours of waiting, Police still failed to capture the gunman alive.

But bungling the job in Toulouse does not necessarily imply that Police have their numbers wrong.

Interior Minister Claude Gueant last week defended the security forces’ efforts to stomp out terrorism in that country, saying 700 people have been detained over the past 10 years, and about 60 “Islamists with terrorist tendencies” are currently in French prisons.

How many active Jihadists are operating in France? And how many are, in effect, engaged in plotting the next wild, murderous attack?

The French news channel France 24 says French authorities believe that only between 20 and 30 French nationals are tied to the radical Jihadist groups in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

CNN, citing a 2010 French intelligence estimate, says the potential number is more like 200 or 250.

Mathieu Guidère, a professor of Islamic and Middle Eastern studies at the University Toulouse II-Le Mirail, told France 24 that the number of French radical Islamists, both violent and non-violent, may be as high as one thousand, with a nucleus of a few—only 10 to 20—who are engaged in plotting.

How reliable are those figures? This depends on the reliability of the men and women in and out of uniform who gather the data. And in that area, the French have been gutsy leaders rather than cowardly followers.

Marc Perelman, writing for Front Page Magazine in 2006, described a 1988 appearance of Alain Marsaud, then France’s top antiterrorist magistrate, before FBI new recruits at the bureau’s academy in Quantico, Virginia.

Marsaud told the audience of would-be federal agents of the deadly threat posed to Western society by radical Islamist terrorist networks. His presentation was “an unmitigated flop.”

“They thought we were Martians,” said Marsaud, who at the time of the interview chaired the French Parliaments domestic security commission. “They were interested in neo-Nazis and green activists, and that was it.”

Excellent cheese and wine aside, it was France which uncovered and thwarted a plot to crash a jetliner into the Eiffel Tower, which was a chilling preview of the 9/11 attacks on the US. France was the first to deal with the unpleasant fact that its own citizens may become assets of Islamist terrorist groups—years before British Muslims bombed the London Underground.

France learned all about Arab terrorism from the Algerian war in the 1950’s, from Palestinian groups in the 1970s, and from Iranian- and Syrian-inspired terrorism in the 1980s. As a result France developed a system that connects seamlessly the judiciary and security forces.

The 1986 comprehensive antiterrorism law set up a centralized unit of investigating magistrates in Paris, headed initially by Marsaud, with jurisdiction over all terrorism cases. Unlike other French criminal proceedings, “terrorist trials in France are judged only by panels of professional magistrates, without the participation of juries.”

Perelman writes:

In the French system, an investigating judge is the equivalent of an empowered U.S. prosecutor. The judge is in charge of a secret probe, through which he or she can file charges, order wiretaps, and issue warrants and subpoenas. The conclusions of the judge are then transmitted to the prosecutors office, which decides whether to send the case to trial. The antiterrorist magistrates have even broader powers than their peers. For instance, they can request the assistance of the police and intelligence services, order the preventive detention of suspects for six days without charge, and justify keeping someone behind bars for several years pending an investigation. In addition, they have an international mandate when a French national is involved in a terrorist act, be it as a perpetrator or as a victim. As a result, France today has a pool of specialized judges and investigators adept at dismantling and prosecuting terrorist networks.

Olivier Guitta wrote in Front Page Magazine in 2005 that “the French understand how clerics and imams radicalize members of the Arab community and help to enlist them in terrorist causes.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/police-arrested-20-islamist-following-toulouse-murders-terrorist-network-may-be-shut-down/2012/03/30/

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