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Posts Tagged ‘redemption’

The Tragic Vacuum (Part Three)

Wednesday, April 13th, 2011

Several weeks ago I published a letter from an elderly Holocaust survivor who expressed her fear regarding the world situation, specifically the hatred of Israel and escalation of anti-Semitism that is reminiscent of pre-Holocaust Europe. Her letter provoked a torrent of e-mails from young and old readers, several of which I published, but I had not responded to her directly. B’ezrat Hashem, I will do so now.

My Dear Friend:

First, allow me to apologize for the delay in responding to your specific questions, but since you are familiar with my columns you are aware I always allow my readers to respond to the challenges under discussion.

I wish I could tell you that your fears are unfounded, that your imagination is running away with you, that reality proves you wrong. Sadly, however, you are right on target and those who make light of your worries are sleeping, even as our people slept in pre-Holocaust Europe.

What we are witnessing today was predicted by our prophets and sages but, alas, we are no longer familiar with their teachings. Ours is a generation of which the prophet Amos said: “And days shall come saith the L-rd, and I shall send a hunger into the land – not a hunger for bread, nor a thirst for water, but a hunger for the Word of G-d.”

This is the spiritual famine we are witnessing today. We simply do not comprehend and we continue on our merry way with business as usual.

Maimonides taught that when suffering is visited upon us, we are commanded to cry out and awaken our people with the sound of the shofar. Everyone must be alerted to examine his or her life and commit to greater adherence to Torah and mitzvos.

Maimonides warned that if we regard the tragedies that befall us simply as “the way of the world” – natural happenings – we will be guilty of achzarius, cruelty.

At first glance, it is difficult to understand why Maimonides would choose the term “cruelty” to describe those who view trials and tribulations as natural happenings. Such people may be unthinking, apathetic, foolish, blind or obtuse, but why accuse them of cruelty?

The answer is simple. If we regard our pain and suffering as mere coincidence, we will feel no motivation to examine our lives, abandon our old ways, and change. So, yes, such an attitude is cruel, for it invites additional misfortune upon ourselves and others.

It would be the height of cruelty to dismiss what is occurring in the world today as mere happenstance. Great Torah luminaries of past generations, such as the Chofetz Chaim and Rabbi Elchanan Wasserman, told us we are entering the final stages of history – a period called “Ikvesa D’Meshicha” – Footsteps of the Messiah.

Our Torah foretells four exiles through which our people would suffer: that of Egypt, of Babylonia, of the Persian-Mede empires and of the Greek and Roman empires – the exile in which we presently find ourselves, for it was the Romans who exiled us when they destroyed the Second Temple.

In Pirkei d’Rabbi Eliezer, an early midrashic work, it is written that before the coming of Messiah we will have to contend with a fifth source of tribulation that will come from Yishmael – the Arabs – who will cause terrible suffering to the world and to our people. This teaching is reaffirmed by Rabbi Chaim Vital, the illustrious disciple of the Arizal, who wrote that before the final curtain falls on the stage of history, Yishmael will inflict torture on our people in ways the world had never before seen.

One need not have great powers of discernment to recognize the painful veracity of these predictions. Just consider the constant, senseless, brutal acts of terror – the suicide bombers, decapitations, hijackings, missiles, etc.

We are the generation that has been destined to witness the fulfillment of the prophecy given to Hagar (Genesis 16:11-13): “Behold, you will conceive and give birth to a son, and you shall name him Ishmael…. and he shall be a wild ass of a man, with his hand against everyone, and everyone’s hand against him .”

The long arm of Ishmael’s terror has indeed reached every part of the world.

There is yet another amazing prophecy in the Yalkut Shimoni – a medieval/midrashic compilation that eerily foretells the events of today and should give us all pause. Rabbi Yitzchok said, “The year in which Melech HaMashiach will be revealed, all the nations of the world will be provoking each other. The king of Persia [Iran] will provoke the king of Arabia. The king of Arabia will go to Edom [the leader of the Christian nations] to take counsel and the King of Persia [Ahmadinejad] will threaten to destroy the entire world.

“The nations of the world will be outraged and panic. They will fall on their faces and will experience pains like birth pangs. Israel too, will be outraged, and in a state of panic ask, ‘Where do we go?’

“But say unto them, ‘My children, do not fear. The time of your redemption has come. And this last redemption shall be different from the first that was followed by further bondage and pain. After this last redemption, you shall not experience any further pain or subjugation’ ” (Yalkut Shimoni, Isaiah 59).

Referring to this teaching, the Klausenberger Rebbe, zt”l, said, “Remember these words. They are perhaps not understood now, but in time they will be, and will be a source of strength to our people.”

Had you heard these prophecies centuries ago, when they were written, you might have laughed and scoffed. Even if you read them as recently as 1970, you would have been hard put to believe it, for of all Muslim countries, the Shah’s Iran was probably the friendliest. But today, the impossible has become possible and events are unfolding so rapidly we have difficulty absorbing their impact. So how are we to understand it all?

The Yalkut compares our suffering to birth pangs. But birth pangs are deceptive – when the contractions begin, it’s easy to ignore them since they are mild and occur between long intervals. As birth becomes imminent, however, the contractions intensify and the pain becomes more intense. And just when it appears the woman can no longer endure the pain, the baby is born and new life enters the world. It is these labor pains to which we are witness today.

How long will the labor last? It’s anyone’s guess, but one thing is certain. Please G-d, the birth is sure to take place. In the interim however, we may very well ask, “Is it possible to ease the suffering? Is it possible to protect ourselves from these painful contractions?”

The answer to that is a most emphatic “Yes!”

(To be continued)

Q & A: Two Adars (Part II)

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011

   QUESTION: I have a few questions regarding the Jewish leap year. Why do we always add a second Adar as opposed to adding a second Tevet or Iyar for example? Why do we call it Adar Alef? Why is Purim celebrated in the second Adar? And which Adar is the real Adar?

Shea Aronovitch

(Via E-Mail)

 

ANSWER: Adar, the name for the 12th month, was adopted by the Jews from the Babylonian exile. While Jews add a month periodically to the lunar calendar after the twelfth month as per the beraita in Rosh Hashanah (7a) (see also Pesachim 6a), the Babylonians did not. The second of the two Adars is considered the “leap” – or extra – month, which we refer to as Adar Sheni (or Adar Bet).
*     *     *
   As we see it so far, the second Adar is the “leap” month. If so, why do we celebrate Purim in the second Adar? The Mechaber explains (Orach Chayyim 685:1), “If the rosh chodesh of Adar that is closest to Nissan [i.e. Adar II] falls on Shabbat, we read Parashat Shekalim [the first of the four special Torah readings - Shekalim, followed by Zachor, Parah, and finally Parashat Hachodesh].”
   The Mishna Berura (ad loc., citing Rashi on Megilla 29a s.v. “Korin beparashat Shekalim” explains that this is done so that in the time of the existence of the Temple they would bring their shekalim in the month closest to rosh chodesh Nissan in order to be able to bring offerings from rosh chodesh and on from the new shekalim donations.
   Also of interest is the dispute between R. Eliezer b. R. Yosi and Rabban Shimon b. Gamaliel (Megilla 6b) as to whether we perform the mitzvot of Purim – reading the Megilla and giving matanot la’evyonim – gifts to the poor – during the first Adar or the second. R. Eliezer b. R. Yosi is of the opinion that we observe the mitzvot of Purim during the Adar closest to Shevat, just as in all the other years, as the verse states (Esther 9:27), “Bechol shana veshana – each and every year,” and we have a rule of “Ein ma’avirin al hamitzvot – We do not allow a mitzvah to be bypassed,” meaning that we perform it as soon as possible.
   Rabban Shimon b. Gamaliel derives from the same verse that just as Purim is in the Adar closest to Nissan in an ordinary year, so is it in a leap year, so that we may connect the redemption of Purim to the redemption from Egypt. Thus, according to Rabban Shimon b. Gamaliel, whose opinion we follow, Purim during a leap year is celebrated during the second Adar for a reason unrelated to whether that month is the added one.
   Rabbi Dov Aaron Brisman (segan av beit din of the Iggud Horabbanim – Rabbinical Alliance of America, rav, Philadelphia) addresses this matter as well (Responsa Shalmei Chova, Yoreh De’ah 94). He was asked about the proper observance of a yahrzeit for a man who died on the second day of rosh chodesh, which is the first day of Adar. The death occurred during a non-leap year, and the deceased’s son wanted to know when to observe the yahrzeit during a leap year – rosh chodesh of Adar I or Adar II.
   Rabbi Brisman cites Chochmat Adam (171:1), Kitzur Shulchan Aruch (221:3), and Kol Bo (on aveilut), all reflecting the Ashkenazi custom to recite kaddish on that day (in this case, the first of Adar) in both Adars of a leap year.
   However, the fast of the ba’al yahrzeit – the one observing the yahrzeit – is only observed in the first Adar. This ruling is rooted in Rema (Orach Chayyim 568:7), Magen Avraham (op. cit. sk20), and Shach (Yoreh Deah 402:sk11).
   Next, Rabbi Brisman cites the opposing view of the Mechaber (Orach Chayyim 568:7). If the death occurs in Adar during a regular year, the fast is observed on that day in the second Adar of a leap year. Rema posits otherwise – that the fast is observed during the first Adar – unless the deceased died during the second Adar of a leap year.
   In that case, the fast is held during the second Adar of all subsequent leap years. If the death occurred during Adar of a regular year or the first Adar of a leap year, the custom is to fast during the first Adar of leap years. Rema also cites the more stringent view of Mahari Molin to fast on that date in both Adars of a leap year.
   As you see, deciding which is the “real” Adar is not a simple matter and has practical repercussions.

(To be continued)

 

   Rabbi Yaakov Klass can be contacted at yklass@jewishpress.com.

Title: The Alternative

Wednesday, November 17th, 2010

Title: The Alternative

Author: Rabbi Yehuda Schwartz

Publisher: Mazo Publishers

 

 

   The Alternative, by Rabbi Yehuda Schwartz, outspoken “Inside View” columnist, is his first book since retiring from The Jewish Press more than 20 years ago. In it, he describes the cosmological connection between Israel and the nations and looks into the future on the subject of Messianism.

 

   In the early 80′s, Rabbi Schwartz’ weekly column earned him an enviable reputation for his impeccable integrity, even as some may have argued with his style. In The Alternative, as a student of the late gaon Reb Chaim Zimmerman, z”l, the author has faithfully presented his understanding of the gaon’s position of redemption in our time, as he heard so many times at his public lectures and sitting at this table in Jerusalem for more than 20 years.

 

   With a vengeance against all political correctness that permeates Jewish thinking on the controversial subject, the author also challenges both Christianity and Islam to come up with a better solution for all mankind than provided for in the Torah.

 

   In The Alternative, Rabbi Schwartz presents the halachic argument for the other option in redemption, a natural evolution from Jewish statehood in 1948 until this very moment, when the nations are coming “on Jerusalem,” exactly as predicted by Jewish prophecy. It is the first comprehensive compendium in English on redemption which, except for a few sections limited to Torah scholars, is written in lucid, straightforward and precise language, with adequate endnotes and references to corroborate its conclusions.

 

   Until now, the Rambam’s description of Messianism (see end Hilchot Melachim) has singularly dominated discussion and understanding on the subject of Moshiach. However, the transfer of Jewish ownership from the United Nations back into the collective hands of tzibbur in Israel, Rabbi Schwartz posits, effectively changed the rules of “his coming.”

 

   The new school of thought no longer speaks of the “coming of Moshiach.” Rather, the modern understanding supports the probability that the Jewish nation, returned to its homeland, through a series of “natural causes,” is now preparing the infrastructure for the eventual body of Jewish law which will probably appoint the King of Israel, who will then be anointed with the oil of kings reserved for his occasion, according to tradition, now lying buried beneath the present Temple site.

 

   In Chapter 4, the two redemption possibilities – “hastened” or “in its time” – based on the Gemara (Sanhedrin 98a) – and specifically outlined and developed in detail in the traditional Shmoneh Esreh, are opened to the reader perhaps for the first time, even though it is recited three time daily. At the beginning, to be worthy of the complete redemption in a “hastened” scenario, we need perfect faith, perfect repentance and perfect healing from the effects of the long exile.

 

   The “in its time” possibility following, outlines and presents in detail the program of a natural redemption in our time, based on the Gemara (Megilla 17b).

 

   Additional Messianic subjects covered in The Alternative are: Messianic Origins, Redemption and the Seven Proofs, Religious Wars, the Temple Mount, and the End of Days – The Future. When asked what he hoped to achieve with The Alternative, Rabbi Schwartz said he hoped it would open the hearts and minds of those many who simply have been confused over the years on the whole subject of Moshiach and were stuck with slogans.

 

   To this reviewer, The Alternative is “an eye-opener,” a must for all serious students of the redemption, and a guidebook to future events as the world continues coming against Israel and Jerusalem.

 

   Rabbi Schwartz’ courage and willingness to put his understanding of this period in book form, as he gleaned from a master of Torah and logic, will leave the burden of proof on future generations against his erudite presentation on the subject.

 

   The Alternative is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Mazo Publishers and selected bookstores.

Title: The Alternative

Wednesday, November 17th, 2010

Title: The Alternative


Author: Rabbi Yehuda Schwartz


Publisher: Mazo Publishers


 


 


   The Alternative, by Rabbi Yehuda Schwartz, outspoken “Inside View” columnist, is his first book since retiring from The Jewish Press more than 20 years ago. In it, he describes the cosmological connection between Israel and the nations and looks into the future on the subject of Messianism.

 

   In the early 80′s, Rabbi Schwartz’ weekly column earned him an enviable reputation for his impeccable integrity, even as some may have argued with his style. In The Alternative, as a student of the late gaon Reb Chaim Zimmerman, z”l, the author has faithfully presented his understanding of the gaon‘s position of redemption in our time, as he heard so many times at his public lectures and sitting at this table in Jerusalem for more than 20 years.

 

   With a vengeance against all political correctness that permeates Jewish thinking on the controversial subject, the author also challenges both Christianity and Islam to come up with a better solution for all mankind than provided for in the Torah.

 

   In The Alternative, Rabbi Schwartz presents the halachic argument for the other option in redemption, a natural evolution from Jewish statehood in 1948 until this very moment, when the nations are coming “on Jerusalem,” exactly as predicted by Jewish prophecy. It is the first comprehensive compendium in English on redemption which, except for a few sections limited to Torah scholars, is written in lucid, straightforward and precise language, with adequate endnotes and references to corroborate its conclusions.

 

   Until now, the Rambam’s description of Messianism (see end Hilchot Melachim) has singularly dominated discussion and understanding on the subject of Moshiach. However, the transfer of Jewish ownership from the United Nations back into the collective hands of tzibbur in Israel, Rabbi Schwartz posits, effectively changed the rules of “his coming.”

 

   The new school of thought no longer speaks of the “coming of Moshiach.” Rather, the modern understanding supports the probability that the Jewish nation, returned to its homeland, through a series of “natural causes,” is now preparing the infrastructure for the eventual body of Jewish law which will probably appoint the King of Israel, who will then be anointed with the oil of kings reserved for his occasion, according to tradition, now lying buried beneath the present Temple site.

 

   In Chapter 4, the two redemption possibilities – “hastened” or “in its time” – based on the Gemara (Sanhedrin 98a) – and specifically outlined and developed in detail in the traditional Shmoneh Esreh, are opened to the reader perhaps for the first time, even though it is recited three time daily. At the beginning, to be worthy of the complete redemption in a “hastened” scenario, we need perfect faith, perfect repentance and perfect healing from the effects of the long exile.

 

   The “in its time” possibility following, outlines and presents in detail the program of a natural redemption in our time, based on the Gemara (Megilla 17b).

 

   Additional Messianic subjects covered in The Alternative are: Messianic Origins, Redemption and the Seven Proofs, Religious Wars, the Temple Mount, and the End of Days – The Future. When asked what he hoped to achieve with The Alternative, Rabbi Schwartz said he hoped it would open the hearts and minds of those many who simply have been confused over the years on the whole subject of Moshiach and were stuck with slogans.

 

   To this reviewer, The Alternative is “an eye-opener,” a must for all serious students of the redemption, and a guidebook to future events as the world continues coming against Israel and Jerusalem.

 

   Rabbi Schwartz’ courage and willingness to put his understanding of this period in book form, as he gleaned from a master of Torah and logic, will leave the burden of proof on future generations against his erudite presentation on the subject.

 

   The Alternative is available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Mazo Publishers and selected bookstores.

Heeding The Cry Of The Unborn

Monday, March 29th, 2010

Let’s face it: it’s unusual and even somewhat bizarre nowadays to encounter a family with more than two children. It is almost as if a war is launched against the unborn after a “red line” of two or three children has been reached.

Instead of enriching our world with the unparalleled innocence and joy of children, we have impoverished it with various ways of contraception. It’s no wonder the birth ratio of our global population is rapidly deteriorating. In the United States, it stands at 2.11 children per family. Europe’s birth ratio is even lower: it currently stands at 1.38 children per family, and if not for the massive influx of immigrants from North Africa and the Middle East, it could have been much worse.

My wife and I were made aware of these shocking statistics after we were blessed with our sixth child a few weeks ago. “When are you going to stop?” many asked. “We really hope this is your last one,” others suggested gently, with a tone of affection and bewilderment.

Why has our society developed a mindset obsessed with birth control and family planning? Are we afraid of overpopulating the world? Have we become unsure of our ability to raise more than two children?

Bringing up children involves an enormous sacrifice of emotion, time, attention and financial resources. Every parent knows that when a child is born, a new environment is created in the home. The new arrival swiftly captures the center stage of consciousness. The focus of life suddenly shifts from “I” to “you,” from receiving to giving.

But in our society – where the “I” is idolized and the “you” is invariably abandoned – where does one find space for children and the sacrifice they require? Can the selfish man or woman become selfless and allow room for unborn children?

Perhaps there’s an additional reason for the reluctance of our society to procreate: It’s no secret that children intensify the love and commitment between spouses. When a husband and wife have children they learn to surmount their differences and unite in love and devotion for the sake of their offspring. As more children are born, the commitment only deepens, as every child becomes another binding factor.

Yet today, many prefer to shy away from this binding commitment due in large part to the unprecedented number of divorces around the world. Further, this crisis often raises doubt and ambiguity in the minds of many a husband and wife who wonder whether their spouse is really “the right one.”

“Maybe I should have married someone richer, smarter or stronger,” they fantasize. But if the marriage unit is not established as a fait établi, it will never be able to soar to new heights of love and commitment. For how can one build a towering edifice and an everlasting genealogical tree of blossoming branches and fruits without solid foundations of certainty?

“For this is what God says – He who fashioned and made the earth did not create it to be empty, but formed it to be inhabited” (Isaiah 45:18). Indeed, the purpose of creation was to inhabit the world and elevate it. The world is not complete without the habitation of man. And the world will only reach its ultimate purpose through the unique contributions of each and every human being.

This poignant idea was well articulated by the Talmud (Avodah Zarah, 5a): “The son of David will come [and the world will attain a state of completion and redemption] only when all the souls destined to [inhabit earthly] bodies will be exhausted.” So if a person is blessed with the health (physical, emotional and mental) and ability to procreate, how can he or she halt the future contributions of the unborn that will bring about redemption to the world? And would the world ever have evolved if the parents of our historical heroes had decided not to bear them? And would you, the reader of this essay, be here today if not for the unwavering faith and commitment of your parents to give birth and raise a personal hero of their own?

Woody Allen once said, “I do not want to achieve immortality through my work. I want to achieve it through not dying.” Alas, in the end, everyone departs this world. Of course, our inner souls, unaffected by death, will continue to live on forever in the World to Come. Yet there exists a way in which we can continue to have an impact in this world even after our passing: we can have children. Most human achievements come and go. But children have the unique power to carry our lives onward, until the end of time.

Haman-nejad

Wednesday, March 17th, 2010

Something about this Purim bothered me. It seemed too relevant. Once again, a Persian Haman has emerged – Haman-nejad (nejad or nezhad is a Persian suffix meaning “descendant of”), who has again made the existence of Israel a topic for debate. Some say that the world is better off with Israel, and others say that the world is better off without Israel. “Enlightened” academia has not yet decided, but it looks like the scales are tipping in favor of a world without Israel.

 

These days are reminiscent of the 30s. The giddy optimism after World War I was gradually replaced by the foul winds of anti-Semitism and hatred. Slowly but surely, the enlightened world surrendered to the new fashion. Weak politicians made peace with the trend. Frightened Jews closed themselves in their neighborhoods as violent anti-Semitic incidents became routine. The establishment explained that the Jews must ride the murky wave – and that with time, it would pass.

 

When I was a boy, I was taught that another Holocaust cannot happen because we have a state. This line of thinking was bolstered by religious Zionist determinism that declared that the redemption process was a given. I always found comfort in the thought that while the State of Israel could bring suffering upon itself, its existence was guaranteed. Today, I no longer think so. The redemption is certainly guaranteed, but on one of the declines on the path that leads to redemption, we can certainly lose our state – at a terrible price.

 

Every physical holocaust must be preceded by delegitimization and dehumanization of the intended victims. The murder of six million Jews would not have been possible if not for the fact that it was preceded by the negation of their honor and basic human rights. The Persian tyrant’s nuclear plans are not as dangerous as the public debate that he has managed to arouse and the “Jewish Question” that has once again found its way into public discourse.

 

The average Israeli prefers to hide his head in the sand and trust Israel’s leadership to deal with the problem. Outside Israel, anyone who does not look too Jewish can still feel fairly comfortable. But that is precisely the syndrome of 1938: the threat is so horrific that the average person cannot integrate it – and chooses to ignore it instead.

 

This is not a problem that will go away if we ignore it. If you read the Scroll of Esther, you will understand what made Haman hate the Jews. Then listen to Haman-nejad and you will find the same paradigm.

 

The story of Purim begins with a feast that King Achashveirosh hosted in his palace, a celebration of his royal decree forbidding the rebuilding of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. In honor of the auspicious event, Achashveirosh invited the Jews of his capital, Shushan, to celebrate. He made sure that the Holy Temple vessels that had been stolen by the Babylonians when they destroyed the Temple were prominently on display.

 

The Jews were flattered to be invited, and wanted to prove that they were good Persians. They relished the opportunity to rub shoulders with Persian high society. That is where Haman stepped in. If you look at the caricatures in the Nazi Der Sturmer, you will see that the assimilated German Jew aroused the same disgust as the German Amalek.

 

And what does Haman-nejad say? He says that he has no problem with the Jews. He only has a problem with the Zionists. “It is a shame what the Germans did to the Jews,” he says. “So let the Austrians and Germans find them a place to live in Europe – not at the expense of the Palestinians.” And between us, the Foreign Ministry of the “Singapore of the Middle East” has a hard time explaining why the modern-day Haman is mistaken. If we are not a Jewish state, but rather a state of all its citizens, then what right do we have to act like colonialists?

 

In Tel Aviv, we hear this: “It is all the settlers’ fault. We will eliminate their settlements and everything will work out.” There were German Jews who also thought that the hatred they were experiencing was because of the Ost Yidden – the Eastern (Polish) Jews. About a year ago, I read an interview with German Jewish Holocaust survivors who are still convinced that the horrors that they experienced could have been prevented if not for the Ost Yidden.

 

The Purim story has a happy ending. But Jewish history has other stories that do not end quite as happily. We would be wise to learn the Purim story well to understand what caused the turnabout that saved the Jews. It just may help us deal with the storm clouds gathering on our horizon.

Title: Redemption to Redemption: The VERY Deep & Intricate Connection Between the Holidays Purim and Pesach

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

Title: Redemption to Redemption: The VERY Deep & Intricate Connection Between the Holidays Purim and Pesach


Author: Rabbi Pinchas Winston


Publisher: Thirtysix.org


 


 


   Remember to breathe as you read Redemption to Redemption: The VERY Deep & Intricate Connection Between the Holidays Purim and Pesach. The enlightening ideas presented by author Rabbi Pinchas Winston will boggle your mind. They’re the stuff of terrific discussions in any Jewish setting.

 

   Learn why Haman cleverly chose to build a gallows specifically 50 amot high in order to destroy not only Mordechai HaTzadik, but also the entire Jewish people. He was no fool. You won’t be either after reading that passage. You’ll also realize, with the author’s help, why we celebrate Purim only in the Adar sheini of Jewish leap years.

 

   Leaping right into the topic of geula (redemption) do you know why the nun sha’arei binah, the 50 Gates of Understanding, predicate eternal Jewish freedom? Care to learn why that’s relevant to the 50-amot courtyard outside the Mishkan?

 

   Can you explain the ever-higher levels of consciousness that a Jew attains by reaching pardes? And just what sort of orchard is that place, anyway? Balak and Bilaam knew, and this book explains why they invested great effort in cursing the Jewish nation. Hint: it all comes down to the exalted state of unity among the klal at Mattan Torah and the intellectual state that precedes such achdut. Hoshea understood the phenomenon. After reading this book, you can, too.

 

   Most Jews learn that Amalek represented cynicism, the polar opposite of Torah’s eternally positive point of view. Read Redemption to Redemption and learn why this makes Amalek relevant to the manna that fell from Heaven to nourish Jews in the desert. A few paragraphs later, you’ll understand why the power and gift of speech have so much in common with the lessons of Parshat HaMan, too.

 

   As the chapters leave Purim and delve into Pesach, readers will grow wide-eyed with wonder while considering the stunning act of chesed and damage control that Yosef achieved with his somewhat dysfunctional brothers. The life-saving importance of his exemplary behavior is a lesson for the ages: Appearances can conceal or reveal the truth. Yosef teaches us throughout the millennia that anyone associated with Torah life should strive for truth.

 

   Redemption to Redemption comes in spiral-bound or PDF formats exclusively through www.thirtysix.org. Answers as to how we Jews can actualize the geula appear in both versions of the book, covering material from Pri Tzadik Parshat Balak 3 to much of the vast world of genuine Jewish literature.

 

   Rabbi Winston has devoted his adult life studying and teaching these lessons. His time has been well spent. It can save generations of Jews from making misguided choices.

 

   The book offers a superb look at the deeper meanings of Torah life. It bears haskamah from Jerusalem’s Rabbi Mordechai Friedlander. Redemption to Redemption: The VERY Deep & Intricate Connection Between the Holidays Purim and Pesach belongs in shuls, homes and educational institutions for every age.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/title-redemption-to-redemption-the-very-deep-intricate-connection-between-the-holidays-purim-and-pesach/2009/03/04/

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