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April 20, 2014 / 20 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘Religious soldiers’

Potential Religious Chief of Staff Promoted to Shomron Commander

Monday, February 24th, 2014

The IDF officer who was brought to a disciplinary trial 10 years ago for allowing his soldiers to shoot live fire at violent leftist rioters has been promoted to commander of the Shomron Brigade.

Col. Shai Kalfer, who studied at Yeshiva Shavei Hevron before enlisting in the Golani unit, will take over the brigade in the same area where his soldiers shot at rioters in December 2003 and injured lightly two protesters, one of them an American leftist.

When “demonstrators” are throwing rocks – not stones, but rocks and boulders – and metal objects at you, a normal soldier would shoot back. That is why he has a rifle.

But that is only true in the United States, Britain, France and other normal countries, without even questioning the behavior of the goon squads in Arab countries where shooting rioters is not good enough when they can be raped and tortured.

But Israel is the land of lots of Jews with the Christian view that turning the other cheek will show the enemy. Things work differently here, where the anti-Zionists must be right if they say Jews are wrong.

Partly due to the massive foreign media barrage every time a soldier raises his weapon at someone trying to injure him, he has to consult his lawyer because he is almost certain to be investigated as if he were a traitor, especially if he actually pulls the trigger.

Flashback to 2003: Kalper was a company commander in the Golani Battalion while on patrol at the anti-suicide bombing fence, AKA Apartheid Wall because it denies the rights of suicide bombers to express their frustrations at being alive and at Jews being alive.

Dozens of leftists and anarchists, who know as much about the Arab-Israel struggle as most of y’all know about the aborigine culture in Australia, pummeled Kalper and his soldiers with their favorite peaceful weapons, rocks and anything else that that is not nailed to the ground and can be thrown.

The soldiers took refuge behind their jeep and received permission to shoot at the leftists.

Kalper was hauled into a military court for violating the bleeding hearts’ laws, but the judges concluded that no criminal action was justified since the soldiers arrived at the scene without proper riot-dispersal equipment.

The file was closed, and Kalper was able to continue his military career.

The Maariv Hebrew-language newspaper wrote in 2007 wrote that he was one of the 10 most promising religious soldiers who might take the helm of the IDF as Chief of Staff in the future.

His promotion to command the Shomron Brigade is a step in that direction. The last religious officer who was brigade commander and considered to be a future candidate as the Chief of Staff was Col. Dror Weinberg, who was commander of the Hebron Brigade. He was one of 10 soldiers and officers gunned down in a Friday night ambush by Arab terrorists near the Patriarchs’ Cave in Hebron in 2002.

Maariv reported Monday that when the IDF was asked to respond to the apparently shocking promotion of a man who allowed his soldiers to defend themselves, the military replied, “This is an old incident that was concluded in a disciplinary court. The officer involved [Kalper} has fulfilled subsequent positions excellently and in our eyes could be advanced to bridge commander.”

After his yeshiva studies, Kalper enlisted at the age of 20 instead of 18, making him older than his sergeant,  and he was called “the old man” by his soldiers, who also  have called him the “greatest and most responsible fighter.” In the newspaper survey of religious officers in 2007, Kalper’s soldiers had nothing but praise for him.

Too Many Religious Officers and a Constitution

Sunday, February 10th, 2013

In an interview last week with Makor Rishon, Dr. Arye (Arik) Carmon, head of the Israel Democracy Institute said,

“as the number of religious commanders in the army increases, we’re in for bigger problems.”

Dr. Carmon is not only the president of the Israel Democracy Institute, but he is one of the senior members of a group of people trying to put together a Constitution (“by Concensus”) for the state of Israel. A Constitution that is supposed to represent all of Israeli society and our shared values.

HIS CLARIFICATION

Following the publication of his statement last week, Carmon felt that there was a need to clarify what he really meant.

Carmon said (with my comments added in [italics]):

“As someone who was injured during my army service [yes, because that now gives any statement he makes automatic legitimacy], and whose sons fight shoulder to shoulder with their brother’s [see previous comment], the religious soldiers, the alumni of the National-Religious educational system, I have much respect for them, to the soldiers and commanders in the IDF whose contributions to the security of Israel are priceless [did he mention that some of his best friends are religious too?].It’s important for me to clarify that in the heat of the interview, my words were not understood properly [Actually, I think we did understand them properly].

I meant, that as long as there is no solution for the source of the authority in the IDF in general, and specifically, including the integration of women [because listening to women sing, is the biggest problem the army faces], the problems will grow and increase. As the number of religious soldiers and commanders grow, since the authority of their Rabbis is what rules for them, the size of the problem will get larger. More and more officers and soldiers will find themselves indecisive when they face this conflict.

Any other way to understand my words is mistaken.”

I’m honestly not sure what is worse, the original statement or his clarification.

Carmon is clearly afraid of two things, that the soldiers have a moral authority and value system that he doesn’t share, that supersedes blindly following orders, and that religious soldiers are blocking his coercive goals of secular-democratic supremacy.

His first problem is that religious soldiers listen to a higher moral authority, and he is afraid of the conflict that religious soldiers might have, especially if there are too many of them, and how that will affect their following orders.

Though logically that doesn’t make sense, because if there are more religious soldiers who share a common moral thought process, the conflict is unlikely to trickle down, as obviously immoral and illegal orders will be identified and stopped higher up in hierarchy – as they should be.

But, Carmon is thinking of two specific issues – one he states, which is the integration of women, and the other, which I believe he implies, is not following orders in case of another Expulsion/Disengagement – the classic Israeli argument of moral/religious right vs. the tyranny of the majority- the Jewish-Democratic state conflict.

Carmon has firmly placed himself firmly on one side of that argument, the secular side that immorally kicked out 8000 Jews from their homes and let a terrorist state develop in Gaza, and would do so again in Judea and Samaria if they could.

ONE SIDED CONCERN

Yet Carmon apparently doesn’t have a problem with too many left-wing pilots or reservists, hundreds of whom famously signed onto petitions saying they won’t follow orders to attack our enemies. You would think that he would find an identifiable group who seditiously and openly called for disobeying orders to attack the enemy to be far more worrisome than religious soldiers and officers, with a healthy and respected value system. But as you’ll see later in the article, he doesn’t.

To my knowledge, Carmon has never said that as the number of Left-wing pilots grows, the problems will increase. No, he specifically said the problem is with too many religious commanders.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/muqata/too-many-religious-officers-and-a-constitution/2013/02/10/

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