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May 4, 2016 / 26 Nisan, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘Republican’

Will Israel be ‘Trumped’ by the US Presidential Elections?

Thursday, March 10th, 2016

There is a great deal at stake for Americans voting in this year’s U.S. presidential elections — but at least as much is riding on the results for the State of Israel.

GOP frontrunner Donald Trump has been one of the few candidates in the race to insist he would maintain neutrality when dealing with Israel and the Palestinian Authority from the White House.

Israeli Jews surveyed so far have nevertheless expressed more faith in his ability to deal fairly with Israel than any of the other candidates.

This may be due to Trump’s blunt, “in your face” style – the very characteristic that so alienates some of his American audiences – but which is similar to a large percentage of Israelis in the Jewish State.

It is far easier to deal with a person who is “up front” about their intentions, one might say, than a smiling politician who hides the weapon. Moreover, Trump pulls no punches about dealing with tough situations in a like manner – a necessary Middle Eastern attitude.

But probably the biggest factor in his popularity has to do with his willingness to simply say he will be neutral in dealing with both sides.

At an MSNBC town hall meeting in South Carolina on Feb. 17, Trump described a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinian Authority as “probably the toughest deal in the world right now to make.” What he did promise was that if he were elected president, he would “give it one hell of a shot.” This was a deal in which he would act as “sort of a neutral guy,” he said. Wisely, when asked whose fault it was that no agreement had been reached so far, he deflected the question – and did not blame either side.

That is the mark of a real negotiator, one who has the seasoned skills of someone who has been at the table for a very long time. It gives the lie to those who claim Trump lacks foreign policy experience; they forget that Trump has been dealing with political leaders around the world for years while cutting deals in nations on different continents for his various business interests.

Israelis have too often heard American politicians claim their undying support of Israel only to throw the Jewish State under the bus as they try to “bring peace” to the Middle East.

However, at a Republican debate held on CNN, Trump did comment at one point: “It doesn’t help if I start saying, ‘I am very pro-Israel, very pro, more than anybody on this stage… With that being said, I am totally pro-Israel.” But he was unwilling to go farther, and made no promises whatsoever. Certainly no promise to ‘bring peace to the Middle East.’

Nearly every single U.S. presidential candidate has vowed to move the American embassy to the Israeli capital of Jerusalem – and not one has done it once taking office.

Every American president swears up and down about the “unbreakable bond” between the two countries – but that didn’t stop President Barack Obama from freezing the supply of basic military equipment and ordnance in the middle of Israel’s defensive counter terrorist war with Hamas in the summer of 2014.

Promises are one thing and action is quite another, and if Israelis have learned anything, it is to know not to depend on fancy promises. So when a guy like Trump says he will be neutral, after flowery vows of endless support – that gets the attention of Israelis who are really sick of making that run for the bomb shelters.

Trump’s style and substance is straightforward, simple and different. He’s making no promises and no pretensions to expertise. He is an executive who says he’ll run the country pretty much the same way – by hiring top experts to do what they do best, in the areas of their specialization.

Hana Levi Julian

Jeb Bush Ends 2016 GOP Presidential Campaign

Sunday, February 21st, 2016

Former Florida governor Jeb Bush made one of the most painful decisions of his life Saturday night: he suspended his 2016 campaign to run for president of the United States.

Bush ran his campaign on his track record, his common sense and his solid background of success. One would think that would have been enough to at least have brought him into the top circle.

He is ethical, knowledgeable, smart, and has a great track record.

But in the age of glitzy multi-media, the Harry Truman thing is no longer enough.

Worse, Bush has two prior presidents in the family that he either had to live up to, or to live down. In either case, they were shadows that followed him wherever he went.

Hillary Clinton’s own historic shadow was right there beside her and able to ride the glitzy 21st century wave of technology. But for the most part, Bush’s shadows mostly left him to face the public alone at every stage. It was only in South Carolina that the family came out to help – and it was too little, too late.

Especially when it came to appearing before the cameras: a place where Bush often appeared awkward and uncomfortable. His body language lacked confidence; when he spoked – always courteous, educated, to the point – his voice held no authority. He shined at Town Hall meetings: but America’s presidential campaigns no longer really depend on these since the country has grown so large, and broadcast media reigns supreme.

When the voters are watching the candidates on television, focus groups interviewed after the debates or the broadcast Town Hall meetings explain: They’re not looking for a micro-manager – presidents HIRE experts. What voters in America look for is a qualified executive who will lead: someone who is knowledgeable, ethical but authoritative and who automatically attracts a nation’s respect.

The media mavens who worked with Jeb Bush either did not work with him long enough, or he wasn’t paying attention. Or maybe he secretly just didn’t want this job bad enough – also a distinct possibility.

(Ted Cruz – Trump’s closest competitor — incidentally, is another candidate who either should be paying more attention to his media mavens – or should change the ones he is working with. He too has major issues with his body language and vocal delivery. Cruz is a candidate who should have easily bypassed Trump by now – but Trump has him beat by a country mile due to his charisma problem.)

In any case on Saturday night, Bush, 63, had enough.

When it was clear he would not even be able to pull South Carolina, where the Bush family is really well-loved, Bush told his supporters: “The people of Iowa and New Hampshire and South Carolina have spoken and I really respect their decision, so tonight I am suspending my campaign,” he said. The audience gasped, according to CNN, which is based in Atlanta, Georgia.

But really, it’s no surprise. What’s surprising is that he was able to hang on this long.

Hana Levi Julian

Clinton Wins Nevada Caucus, Trump Takes SC, Bush is Out

Sunday, February 21st, 2016

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton won a narrow victory in Nevada’s Democratic caucus – but the primary was held on a Saturday and therefore excluded all observant Jewish voters.

Even so, the heavy turnout indicated that Clinton is going to face an uphill battle even in states she thought she might win handily. At the end, with 85 percent of the precincts reporting in Nevada, the two-time First Lady won 53-47.

Sanders congratulated Clinton on her victory and said he looked forward to the primaries and caucuses ahead.

The Republican contest in South Carolina on the same day involved a far broader field, but Donald Trump again triumphed with 33 percent, although his victory margin has narrowed. Senators Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio battled for second place with 99 percent of the precincts reporting; Rubio had a slim lead with slightly more than 22 percent. Rubio had placed third in Iowa, where Cruz won.

Jeb Bush decided to suspend his campaign after a night in which the numbers made it clear he was just not in the picture for this year’s run. It is not yet clear to whom he will encourage his supporters to turn.

At his victory rally, Trump dismissed the idea that other candidates would benefit from Bush’s decision to end his campaign. “[Analysts] don’t understand that as people drop out, I’m going to get a lot of those votes,” he said. He acknowledged the negative turn the race had taken, saying it had become “mean” and “vicious” but added, “When you win, it’s beautiful.”

In typical businessman manner, he ended his speech as if closing a deal: “Let’s put this thing away, and let’s make America great again.”

Hana Levi Julian

Iowa Caucus Produces Cruz for GOP But No Clear Winner for Democrats

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

The two presidential candidates for the Democratic party are still not clear about which one of them won this round in the Iowa caucus.

The process in the state is not a simple primary election as in most others, but rather operates as a “gathering of neighbors” around the state. Voters meet to talk about the candidates, take an initial vote, discuss and then vote again.

The state holds 44 elected delegates who will ultimately help determine the nominee at the Democratic National Convention this summer.

Although campaign officials for Hillary Clinton said the former Secretary of State won a slim victory over Bernie Sanders on Monday, his campaign said the results were not settled: there remain questions in several counties.

The Iowa Democratic Party itself said results in the state were the closest in Iowa Democratic caucus history, and no winner has yet been officially declared.

Clinton and Sanders remained in a virtual dead heat overnight according to every media outlet.

A statement from the party leader called it a “historically close” finish but did not declare a winner. Clinton won 699.57 state delegates, Sanders had 695.49, Martin O’Malley had 7.68 and there were an uncommitted number that totaled 0.46, with one Des Moines precinct that had not yet reported in, with a total of 2.28 state delegate equivalents.

By the end of the night, Martin O’Malley decided to suspend his campaign.

Clinton led among women, and Sanders led among men, according to CBS News. First-time caucus attendees supported Sanders over Clinton, 59 percent to 37 percent. He also drew more support among the “under 30″ crowd – 84 percent – and 58 percent in the 30 to 45 age group. Clinton held sway among those in the 45 to 64 age range (58 percent) and the over 65 crowd (69 percent). The “very liberal” Democrats supported Sanders over Clinton, 58 percent to 39 percent.

The Republican caucus came up with a win for Texas Senator Ted Cruz, and at least a stall for billionaire celebrity Donald Trump. Cruz led the candidates with 28 percent of the vote, followed by Trump with 24 percent, and Florida Senator Marco Rubio extremely close behind with 23 percent, still in the top three.

Cruz set a Republican caucus record on Monday night by winning more than 50,000 votes. The senator is clearly preferred over Trump by the GOP rank-and-file party establishment, although it is still too early to tell who will represent the party in November.

That did not stop Cruz from underlining his anti-Washington Insider campaign in a speech at the end of the evening.

“Iowa has sent notice that the Republican nominees for the next president of the United States will not be chosen by the Washington establishment, will not be chosen by the lobbyists,” Cruz said at a victory party at the Iowa state fair in Des Moines. Instead, he said, the candidate will be “chosen by the most incredibly powerful force where all sovereignty resides in our nation, by ‘we the people’ – the American people.”

Hana Levi Julian

Ahead of the Republican Field, Carson Claims Jewish Support on ‘Gun Control and the Holocaust’

Sunday, October 25th, 2015

(JNi.media) Appearing on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” Republican presidential candidate, retired neurosurgeon Dr. Ben Carson, many in the Jewish community have supported his point of view linking the Nazi gun control efforts and the ease with which they were able to round up Jews. After the October 1, 2015 mass shooting at Umpqua Community College in Oregon, Carson said Hitler would not have attained his goals as easily if the Jews were armed. “There’s a reason these dictatorial people take the guns first,” Carson said, and caught much flak for it.

“Some people will try to take that and, you know, make it into an anti-Jewish thing, which is foolishness,” Carson said, adding that many in the Jewish community have told him he was exactly right.

Carson, who said he would “love” to see abortion becoming illegal nationwide with few exceptions, with the overturning of Roe vs. Wade, told NBC’s Chuck Todd: “I’m a reasonable person and if people can come up with a reasonable explanation of why they would like to kill a baby, I’ll listen.”

He did concede possibly allowing abortions to preserve the life of the mother, saying, “That’s an extraordinarily rare situation, but if in that very rare situation it occurred, I believe there’s room to discuss that.”

Carson is leading the Republican field in recent polling. A Friday Des Moines Regisiter/Bloomberg poll shows him with a nine-point lead in Iowa. A Quinnipiac University poll Thursday gives him an eight point lead over Donald Trump in Iowa.

Alluding to the hatchet job much of the media, as well as his chief rival in the race, billionaire Donald Trump, have done on him, Carson said: “As people get to know me, they know that I’m not a hateful, pathological person like some people try to make me out to be. And that will be self-evident. So I don’t really worry about that.”

As to the attack from Trump saying he has “super low energy,” Carson said, “I’m not sure that there’s anybody else running who has spent 18 or 20 hours intently operating on somebody.”

JNi.Media

Trump Ranks No. 2 GOP Candidate in Nationwide Poll

Wednesday, July 1st, 2015

Donald Trump now is in the number two spot, shared with Ben Carson, in Iowa and Michigan after a survey that already placed him in the second spot in New Hampshire, according to a CNN poll.

The social mood in the United States, as well as most of the world, demands a change, not just from President Barack Obama but from the “establishment” politicians who are viewed by rank and file voters, rightly or wrongly, lackeys for corporate boardrooms and Wall Street.

There are too many people who want “anyone but Trump” for him to be president, but he just keeps on trucking.

The primary elections won’t be held until early next year, but Trump is enjoying solid support from a growing minority. Working against him is the strong dislike of the maverick billionaire by almost half of those polled.

A Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday gives Trump 10% support in Iowa, eight points behind Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and tied with Dr. Ben Carson, another candidate with no political experience. They have left behind better-known names and experienced politicians, some of them like Ted Cruz and Mike Huckabee who are perfect for the conservative state of Iowa. Right behind Carson and Trump are Senators Rand Paul and Ted Cruz, followed by Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio.

Before Trump announced his candidacy, he won only 4% support, according to a poll carried out for Des Moines Register/Bloomberg.

In Michigan, Trump is tied with Carson and also with Bush, with Walker in first place.

Dean Debnam of Public Policy Polling, said in a statement:

Donald Trump’s in the top tier of the Republican field for a second consecutive week in our polling, Time will tell how long the Trump Bump lasts, but it’s at least two weeks at this point.

There are at least 16 Republicans running for the nomination for president, and that makes Trump all the more distinguishable from the others.

The JewishPress.com two weeks ago drew a parallel here between Trump and former Alabama Gov. George Wallace. Like Wallace, Trump does not care what anyone thinks about him or his opinions. He says what he thinks, and you can take it or leave it. Like Wallace, Trump is a magnet for people who resent ObamaCare, resent a dismal American foreign policy, especially in the Middle East, and are fed up with politicians whose popularity is based on how many promises can be made, fulfilled or not.

For them, this is what they want to hear about the biggest domestic issue today:

It’s people—our fine American people, living their own lives, buying their own homes, educating their children, running their own farms, working the way they like to work, and not having the bureaucrats and intellectual morons trying to manage everything for them. It’s a matter of trusting the people to make their own decisions.

It sounds like Trump, but it was out of the mouth of Wallace in the 1968 campaign, when his third-party candidacy attracted 10 million voters and 45 electoral votes.

If Trump loses his bid for the GOP nomination, as expected, and if he decides to run as a third-party candidate, he could cause wreak havoc for both the Republican and Democratic parties.

The pollsters and politicians sneered and mocked Wallace, but his third-party candidacy threatened to throw the election to the House of Representatives, which is what happens if no candidate wins a majority of electoral votes.

For the time being, the media are having a field day covering Trump, as seen in this CNN video here.

Tzvi Ben-Gedalyahu

Obama Accuses GOP Senators of ‘Common Cause with Iran Hardliners’

Monday, March 9th, 2015

President Barack Obama responded Monday to an open letter sent to Iran by 47 Republican Senators to Iran, about the limitations of any agreement signed by his administration with Tehran acquiescing to a nuclear development program the Congress may not like.

Obama accused the senators — who included three presidential candidates — of aligning with Iranian hardliners.

The letter said that any such agreement signed by the president or Secretary of State John Kerry might only last as long as Obama remains in office because it is formatted as an “executive agreement.”

“It’s somewhat ironic to see some members of Congress wanting to make common cause with the hardliners in Iran. It’s an unusual coalition,” Obama told reporters in a brief news conference in the Oval Office on Monday afternoon.

Asked what might happen following any agreement signed by the U.S. and world powers if Congress does not like the deal, the president replied, “If we do (sign) then we’ll be able to make the case to the American people.”

Hana Levi Julian

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/obama-accuses-gop-senators-of-common-cause-with-iran-hardliners/2015/03/09/

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