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December 3, 2016 / 3 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘restaurant’

Popular Albany Kosher Restaurant Gives Up Supervision

Wednesday, September 28th, 2016

“It is with great sadness that This Thursday, September 29th will be the last day that Terra will be Kosher under the supervision of the Vaad,” went the announcement this week on the Facebook page of a unique vegetarian restaurant at 238 Washington Ave., in Albany, NY. Terra, with a large international menu of Vegetarian, Vegan and Pescetarian (pronounced pes·ca·tar·i·an, meaning dining on fish) dishes boasts of being the only full service restaurant of its kind between NYC and Montreal.

Until Thursday, Terra has been under the supervision of the Vaad Hakahsruth of the Capital District, and Rabbi Moshe Bomzer (Orthodox) was the Rav HaMachshir.

The restaurant’s Facebook pages stated plainly: “It has been our privilege to have served the community for almost 22 months. However, without the Jewish travelers, the local support is simply not enough. (Travel season ended after Labor Day).”

“On behalf of our owner, Dzavid Cekic and the ‘man with the dream’ for a kosher restaurant in the Capital District, Howard Katz, we want to say THANK YOU to all who help make TERRA possible. We hope you will stop in on Wednesday or Thursday ‘one moe time’ for a pizza or dinner to say ‘farewell, until we meet again.'”

The Facebook entry promised that “if there is a show of support, we will look to resurrect a new Capital District kosher Restaurant in a smaller space, in a location more suitable for our locals. Thank you again, one and all.”

Terra's Eggplant Parmesan

Terra’s Eggplant Parmesan

Before the closing announcement, Terra claimed that it served “The BEST Eggplant Parmesan in the Capital District, and it ‘happens to be’… Cholov Yisroel Kosher!!!”

Ah, well.

The Terra move represents a loss of 25% of the kosher restaurants available around Albany and Saratoga Springs, NY. For the list of the remaining three, click here.

David Israel

UPDATE: Four Dead, 4 in Critical Condition from Tel Aviv Sarona Market Terror Attack [video]

Wednesday, June 8th, 2016

Four people are dead and 4 more are in critical condition and are being treated at Ichilov Hospital on Wednesday night, in a “Ramadan” terror attack in the Sarona Food MArket, on Kaplan Street in the heart of Tel Aviv. There are additional wounded. The attack happened just before 9:30 PM

According to eyewitnesses, the two Arab terrorists were sitting inside a restaurant dressed in their Ramadan finest clothing. They ordered food and then they stood up. They began shooting their Carl Gustav submachine guns at the other restaurant guests. One of them, after he emptied his gun, threw it down and the two started running.

Both terrorists have been neutralized. One was captured alive but seriously wounded and is undergoing surgery at Ichilov Hospital. The second one is now undergoing interrogation.

Police sappers are dealing with suspected bombs in the area.

Police issued a statement that the situation is under control, as both terrorists have been neutralized.

Arab sources initially claimed the terrorists are from the village of Dura in the Har Hebron region.

The two terrorists are cousins and are from the village of Yatta in the Hebron area, which is near Dura.

Hamas terror chief Ismail Haniyeh praised the attack on his Twitter feed.

 


 

 


 

 

David Israel

There’s Hope for the Left After All

Sunday, January 31st, 2016

Sometimes, when all you hear are the radical and loud voices from the extreme left, such as from the No Israel Fund, the Reform movement’s IRAC, and Meretz, you think they exclusively and unanimously represent everyone on that side of the spectrum – all the secular, all the non-Orthodox and all the Leftists.

But now we know they don’t.

A Meretz councilwoman from Raanana tried to initiate a boycott against a popular restaurant in Raanana

The owner recently decided he wanted his restaurant to be closed on Shabbat – and the Meretz city councilwoman went on a rampage, posting her boycott call on the Meretz-Raanana page.

But instead of getting backing and support – she was strongly rebuked by her own constituency, with hundreds of responses from people who were utterly disgusted, repulsed and embarrassed by her actions and anti-religious beliefs.

When you read these responses, you realize that these radical leftwing leaders don’t properly or fully represent their constituencies, and they are very much like the Arab MKs who are obsessed with acting as anti-Israeli 5th columns in the Knesset, rather than working to improve the quality of life of the citizens that voted them in.

It’s responses like these that show me can all live together.

While our society does have many political and religious differences, perhaps those differences are in truth exaggerated and overstated by these radical organizations and their leadership seeking to maintain, fund and promote themselves via a supposed struggle, schism and conflict that no longer actually exists, and which, in reality, has evolved into a straightforward, healthy and respectful diversity of thought among our different sectors.

Today, that is what I’m choosing to believe.

Here are some of the responses:

Nitay Sheinenzon: “As a member of the Meretz party I express objection and repulsion over this shocking post. Every time a place decides to become kosher and offers service to the religious public, it is blessed, every business that decides to rest on the Day of Rest according to our tradition is legitimate, and I wish them a good day of rest and Shabbat Shalom.”

Nir Koren: “Really? Boycotting a restaurant because it’s kosher? As a Meretz voter, activist and member of the Meretz Conference, I am ashamed that this announcement was posted on a page with my party’s name on it.”

Arik Meshulam: “As a complete atheist, I don’t give a hoot which restaurant is open on Shabbat and which is closed. If a person has decided to close his restaurant on Shabbat, it’s his business, why would you force him to keep it open? It’s his private restaurant. You’re just as bad as the religious people who force businesses to close on Shabbat.”

Erez Wohl: “I join the extreme leftists who think this post is embarrassing. We thought we were past the phase of hate for the religious in Meretz L.”

JoeSettler

Meretz Call to Boycott Restaurant Closing on Shabbat Backfires

Saturday, January 30th, 2016

A popular eatery in one of the more upscale communities along Israel’s Mediterranean coastline has decided to “go kosher” and close its doors on the Sabbath.”

But the decision made by the Raanana River restaurant has disgruntled members of the Meretz party. The local branch went so far as the launch a boycott of the restaurant via Facebook.

“Starting this weekend, the River Raanana has become a shomer Shabbat restaurant, closed on Friday nights and Saturdays,” wrote Idit Diamant on the Meretz Ra’anana Facebook page.

“As there are very few restaurants in Ra’anana that remain open on Friday nights and fewer that make deliveries I personally feel hurt by this change,” she wrote.

“I call upon all those for whom this is important to do as I do and to go also during the week to restaurants that remain open on the Sabbath.

“It is important that the greater public in Ra’anana will make known its opinion and support those businesses that stay open on the Sabbath if we want someone to care about our needs.”

Someone who saw the post was upset enough about the boycott to try and launch a counter demonstration.

“I want to point out that I personally oppose religious coercion in any form; I believe everyone should be free to practice their faith as they see fit, but this post disgusts me,” the writer commented.

“This week I have a meeting in Ra’anana, and of course I am going to eat there, to show my support for [this restaurant,]” the commenter wrote in the post.

 

Additional Details (JNi.Media)

Idit Diamante happens to represent Meretz on the Ra’anana city council, and serves as chair of the transportation committee and the ethics committee, and serves on the Audit Committee, the committee to promote the status of children, to anti-drugs committee, anti-violence committee, subcommittee for planning and construction, the budget distribution committee, and the support committee. She’s a busy lady.

The Ra’anana mayor, Zeev Bielski, represents an independent, local party, aptly named “Ra’anana that We Love.” They have 6 members on the council. Meretz is part of the coalition in Ra’anana, with one of three deputy mayors, Ronit Weintraub. Another deputy mayor is Haim Goldman, from the United Religious List. So it’s not as if Meretz doesn’t know how to get along with religious folks. But that’s a different story.

A mother of four grown boys, Dr. Idit Diamante is a physicist and an engineer, a researcher and hi-tech consultant, who has been in local public service since 1998. On her profile page she states her dedication to women’s causes and to reliable, transparent politics. Heaven knows why, in a moment’s rage, she trashed all that rich experience and seemingly a cool headedness and let her spoiled rich girl’s insensitive side shine through.

Now, here comes the wonderful part about this story: it received close to 300 responses since Friday afternoon, many of which were, predictably enough, from right-wingers who let her have it, as you can imagine. But the most wonderful responses came from people who defined themselves as Meretz members, left-wingers, atheists, who hated it just as much!

Nitay Sheinenzon: “As a member of the Meretz party I express objection and repulsion over this shocking post. Every time a place decides to become kosher and offers service to the religious public, it is blessed, every business that decides to rest on the Day of Rest according to our tradition is legitimate, and I wish them a good day of rest and Shabbat Shalom.”

Nir Koren: “Really? Boycotting a restaurant because it’s kosher? As a Meretz voter, activist and member of the Meretz Conference, I am ashamed that this announcement was posted on a page with my party’s name on it.”

Arik Meshulam: “As a complete atheist, I don’t give a hoot which restaurant is open on Shabbat and which is closed. If a person has decided to close his restaurant on Shabbat, it’s his business, why would you force him to keep it open? It’s his private restaurant. You’re just as bad as the religious people who force businesses to close on Shabbat.”

Erez Wohl: “I join the extreme leftists who think this post is embarrassing. We thought we were past the phase of hate for the religious in Meretz L.”

Finally, a cute post by Daniela Mizrachi: “A good week to everyone and good tidings. Ms. Idit, thank you so much for saving us a lot of advertising expenses, and thank you, everyone, for your support and understanding, we’ll be happy to have you over — River Restaurant, a river of oriental tastes.”

Bon appétit.

Hana Levi Julian

Jewish Money in the Civil War to be Shown in Jerusalem

Sunday, February 1st, 2015

The interest of the Jewish community in the American Civil War has traditionally been minute, as most Jews who arrived came in long after the War had ended. For that reason, two rare American Civil War tokens issued during the war by a Jewish restaurant in New York City have raised much curiosity among collectors.

The 150-year-old tokens will be presented this week at the Kedem Auction House in Jerusalem.

The background of the minting of these tokens lies in the American Civil War, during which the state ran out of money as it consumed the existent stash. This prompted the private issuing of over 10,000 different types of tokens by a wide range of private merchants to fill the gap.

Jews at the time comprised less than one percent of the total population, making Jewish artifacts from the time rare and uncommon. Despite the fact many Jewish merchants issued tokens as many of the Jews worked in commerce, only the Felix Dining Saloon token had Hebrew letters, stating Kosher food was served.

Not only the Hebrew letters make these tokens special however; the reverse side of one of the token reveals the Union Shield and the legend “Constitution and the Union” while another shows an Indian surrounded by 13 stars, representing the USA, of course. This corresponds with the historical research which showed that the contemporary Jews identified almost completely with their neighbors, showing long-term and even post-War loyalty and patriotism with the North or South in accordance with where they lived. Thousands of Jews had fought in the war itself, the majority with the North, though Jews were also slave owners and even slave traders.

The Felix Dining Saloon, a Jewish restaurant in New York, was the one to issue the tokens. The token inscription reveals the saloon was at 256 Broadway, New York, today a residential building opposite to City Hall Park. It should not be surprising that such overt restaurants acted in New York at the time as the Napoleonic Wars (1803 – 1815) brought to a substantial immigration wave of Ashkenazi Jews to the city and communal aid societies were formed.

Meron Eren of the Kedem Auction House concludes that “Small and rare as these tokens might be, they bear the vibrancy of Jewish life in New York, which started already over 150 year ago up till today. The tokens declare on one side the proud Jewish identity, and on the other side – the profound affiliation to the American state and values.”

Jewish Press Staff

What’s Wrong With the Star-K Kosher Phone?

Tuesday, August 20th, 2013

About a month ago the Star-K, a world renowned Kashrus agency, announced that they were certifying kosher phones. These phones have no access to the Internet, cannot place or receive text messages, cannot take photos, and most importantly, cannot be hacked to perform any of these tasks.

It’s not troubling to me that people would want a phone that is insulated from certain tasks. Although I think it is an unnecessary measure and perhaps counter productive, I don’t begrudge people their personal self control restraints.

What is troubling is that a kashrus agency is part of this initiative. A kashrus agency should be concerned with one thing and one thing only. Their singular concern should be the kosher status of the food. I don’t even think that a kashrus agency must concern itself with humanitarian or other ethical issues that may arise. I have no problem with a secondary agency coming in and providing a secondary level of supervision. But the kosher status of the food cannot be affected by anything other its status as kosher food.

So when I see a kashrus agency entering into the phone market, I see an agency that should be worried about kosher status of food but is now legislating morality. It’s not even as if the technical skills involved in kosher supervision overlap the neutering of cell phones. They have nothing to do with each other. I don’t think it is smart for kosher supervision to be intertwined or even related to morality supervision.

Similarly, when kosher supervision agencies make demands on the clientele or ambience of an eating establishment I believe they are overstepping their bounds. There are restaurants that are not allowed to be open at certain hours because they will lose their hechsher if they are open. This is far beyond the scope of kosher supervision. Tell me if the food is kosher and I will decide if I want to patronize the restaurant. That is all we need from a kashrus agency. The stretching of their authority serves no important purpose for the public. It seems to me that it is merely a self-serving, self-righteous way to legislate their morality. If they can legislate phones and who can eat where, what’s next?

I am not making a slippery slope argument. I am pointing out that there is no logical connection between the kosher status of food and the kosher status of a phone. There is also no relationship between the kosher status of a restaurant and whether teenagers are hanging out. In other words, the kashrus agencies are already legislating their morality. There is no reason to think it only will apply in these two instances because there is no connection between these two things and the kosher status of food.

We need to stop using the word kosher for things other than food. Yes, the word is a general term but it has evolved into a word that describes whether food can be eaten by orthodox Jews who keep kosher. We don’t eat anything that is not kosher. Using the word kosher for phones and Internet implies that the non-kosher versions are not allowed to be used. This is sophomoric and divisive.

If anything, the kashrus agencies should be concerned with the ethics and morality of the actual food. This is something they have resisted time and time again. I am not recommending they get into the ethics of food business, but if they must expand their business and purview of supervision I think that is the first place they should be looking to legislate seeing as they have the knowledge and expertise to monitor and report on that aspect of food production. But teens mingling and phones? They don’t belong there at all.

Visit Fink or Swim.

Rabbi Eliyahu Fink

Israel Hotels Attracting Tourists with OU Kosher Certification

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

Israeli restaurants and hotels are more interested n seeking kosher certification from the American-based Orthodox Union (OU) in order to attract foreign tourists, according to the Kosher Today newsletter.

It said that many American Jewish tourists generally are more familiar with the OU than Israeli rabbinic certifications.

The OU operates in Israel in an office near downtown Jerusalem and has several kosher supervisors.

Not all restaurants are willing to accept OU supervision. Kosher Today noted that the La Cuisine restaurant decided to forfeit its OU certification for Passover rather than agree to its requirements for proper cleaning of the facility before the holiday.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/israel-hotels-attracting-tourists-with-ou-kosher-certification/2013/05/07/

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