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July 27, 2016 / 21 Tammuz, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘restaurant’

Williamsburg Store Owners Slammed for Banning Sleeveless Shoppers

Wednesday, July 25th, 2012

If a snooty restaurant can require that men wear dinner jackets in order to be served, is it okay for shopkeepers to require its customers to wear modest attire?  That’s the kind of question being debated in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, these days.

Restaurants with a “no shoes, no service” rule have been commonplace for years.  That rule is partly for health purposes, but it is also partly because many people are turned off by seeing someone else’s bare feet when they eat.  If someone is barefoot and hungry, they’ll just have to go to a different restaurant and no one thinks about raising claims of discrimination.

But for some reason the ban by certain Orthodox Brooklyn shopkeepers on customers’ cleavage and bare shoulders has raised the ire of some local consumers, and confused the general public and even law professors concerning permissible limitations on public attire.

One of the complaints is that the stores with the dress codes serve lots of people, not just Jews.

“Religious freedom is one thing, but we do not have the right to enforce our beliefs on someone else,” one local resident claimed.

Another added, “Why should they be able to say that on their signs?  It’s not OK.”

Actually, it is.

So long as the shopkeepers are only telling you what you cannot do in their store – in other words, not requiring you to change your own lifestyle to conform to their own – the shopkeeper has wide latitude about what can be required of customers.  And it isn’t as if the Brooklyn dress codes require customers to follow the religious practices of the storeowners.  There is no prohibition on women wearing pants, for example, nor is there a distinction made between men and women – the discrimination is appearance-based, not gender based.

Marci Hamilton teaches Constitutional Law at Cardozo Law School.  Presumably she knows the difference between discrimination imposed by the government – which is virtually always verboten – and restrictions imposed by private actors, such as shopkeepers, on their personal property, which is almost always permissible, so long as not overtly discriminatory.

When asked to comment on signs hanging in Brooklyn shop windows that state: “No Low Cut Neckline Allowed in the Store,” or “Entry here in modest dress only,” Hamilton bristled.

According to an account in the New York Post, Hamilton referred to the Orthodox dress code as a form of “Balkanization” of the United States.  She said, “It’s no longer sufficient that [the Orthodox] have shared norms among themselves, they are increasingly trying to impose their norms on the rest of the culture.”

UCLA Constitutional Law professor Eugene Volokh, however, points out that there is no constitutional clause against Balkanization.  “Indeed, it is perfectly legal and a part of American tradition that certain communities in the United States prefer to interact primarily within their own parameters, the Amish, for example.”

For Volokh, so long as the dress code applies equally – and it need not even be applied exactly equally – and doesn’t single out people of a certain race, color or gender – there is nothing unconstitutional about the dress codes.

“There are still plenty of fancy restaurants in New York City that require men wear jackets, aren’t there?” Volokh asked.  “What’s the difference?”  In fact, a quick check reveals the famous 21 Club in Manhattan prohibits sneakers and jeans, and dinner jackets are required for male patrons.

Nonetheless, Hamilton maintained, “There’s a movement toward insularity among religious groups.  It’s dangerous for tolerance, and it’s also dangerous for peace.”

The dress code requirements of Orthodox shopkeepers may be dangerous for their own bank accounts, but it’s hard to understand how such standards could endanger peace.

Lori Lowenthal Marcus

Shootout and Chase in Eilat

Sunday, July 22nd, 2012

During an armed robbery overnight at the La Casa restaurant in Eilat, two policemen who arrived at the scene had their guns taken away by the thieves.

The thieves then fled the scene, hijacked a taxi. Three addditional police cars began chasing them through the streets of Eilat.

During the chase, policemen managed to shoot out the tires of the taxi.

The thieves exited the taxi and began shooting back at the policemen. The police shot back and killed one of the armed robbers, the second was injured.

The thieves were from a village in Israel’s north and are related.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Scotland’s Only Glatt Kosher Restaurant

Thursday, June 21st, 2012

If you are seeking a new place to visit this summer with all kosher amenities at your disposal, why not visit Scotland? Glasgow has a full range of Jewish facilities to cater for tourists and business people alike. Including daily minyanim, a mikveh for men and women, and kosher food. Edinburgh has a mikveh for ladies, minyanim only a few times during the week.

Whatever holiday you require, be it luxury, basic or partial self-catering, let L’Chaim’s Restaurant provide all your culinary requirements. These include nightly dining at L’Chaim’s gourmet restaurant, ready to heat/hot meals delivered to your hotel (or can be collected), breakfast trays, lunch trays, fresh sandwiches, and a comprehensive menu of all Shabbos meals including cholent with or without a slow cooker anywhere in Scotland.

The restaurant is under the hashgacha of the West of Scotland Kashrus commission and is personally supervised by Rabbi Chaim and Rebbetzin Sora Jacobs, Lubavitch shluchim in Glasgow for 42 years. Only Kedassia or MH Manchester shechita is used.

When you walk into L’Chaim’s you are invited to dine in the candle-lit dining room with its own decorative ambiance. Its elegant setting and smart décor is ideal for a relaxing night out and business meetings.

Once seated, freshly baked French baguettes are brought to your table and the experience of first class cuisine in trendy surroundings begins. L’Chaim’s has a wine license and you can enjoy a choice of 15 popular kosher wines.

The restaurant is located on the complex of Giffnock Shul, the largest congregation in Scotland, headed by Rabbi Moshe Rubin. It is the only shul with a daily and Shabbos minyan both morning and evening.

Besides numerous luxury hotels in Glasgow, there are two small hotels close to Giffnock Shul, enabling people to enjoy Shabbos minyanim and atmosphere. People can purchase all their Shabbos and weekday meals from L’Chaim’s.

You can try one of the two hotels listed below: Redhurst Hotel, tel. 0141-638-6465, Redhurst@lineone.ne. Orchard Park Hotel, tel. 0141-638-1044, e-mail ozcapaldi@hotmail.com.

Hotels in Scotland will heat and store meals for guests as required and provide a table for guests to enjoy their Shabbos and weekday kosher food. Check with the hotel when booking your room.

For further information, see go to www.lchaimsrestaurant.co.uk.

Jewish Press Staff

Kosher Delight Has Slung Its Last Burger

Tuesday, June 19th, 2012

Kosher Delight, one of the longest surviving kosher establishments in Manhattan, sold its last burger on June 17.

Since opening in 1984, the restaurant has been a fixture for any Jewish tourists visiting New York and almost every religious Jew in the city has eaten there at least once. The news was originally posted by Dani Klein on his blog, YeahThatsKosher.com. He said that reaction has been mixed since he had started blogging about the closing.

“A lot of people say it’s about time, and a lot of people are complaining: what am I going to do before the Knicks or Rangers game?” Klein said. “It’s a mainstay for our generation. I happen to love the Double Delight. I still think it’s one of the best burgers if you like that type of burger.”

Klein had reservations though.

“It definitely wasn’t the cleanest place,” he said. “If you ever went down to the bathroom, not only was it scary but it smelled like dead chickens.”

Klein said he wasn’t sure about the reasons for the closure, but suspected it had to do with declining sales and health food violations. His blog quoted the most recent New York Restaurant report that cited seven violations, five of which were rated as major. In the inspection prior to that, the restaurant received a grade of A. The restaurant was written up for 49 violations.

Ratings for the restaurant according to Yelp, the online review site, were negative.

Zechariah Mehler, a kosher food critic for Long Island-based newspaper, The Jewish Star, said he believed declining standards had led to the closure.

“Even by the standards of fast food, the quality of KD had been declining over the past few years,” said Mehler. “That decline, mixed with the rising number of fast food and lunch spots in the area must have seriously impacted the restaurant.”

A person identifying themselves as a member of the Huberfeld family that owned the Kosher Delight in midtown and the one in Brooklyn said that the closure was caused by simply a new lease.

“After 28 years at this location, the current landlord did not offer a lease renewal to Kosher Delight at a price that Kosher Delight could afford,” the Huberfelds’ impromptu spokesman said. “Sales have remained consistent over the last several years. Different competitors have come and gone, but our strong and loyal customer base has remained and contributed to our success. As a matter of fact, as news of the store’s pending closure circulated, we received hundreds and hundreds of emails asking if we plan on re-opening.”

The spokesman said that the Brooklyn location on Avenue J, which has been open since 1979, will continue operating.

In many ways, blogger Klein said, the closure of Kosher Delight was emblematic of a larger trend in kosher food.

“I think that we’re seeing a surge in restaurants that are classier — even cheaper restaurants that are cleaner and more modern,” Klein explained. “We don’t expect cheap prices because kosher is never cheap, but at least we could get a clean environment with a smile. Because we keep kosher… doesn’t mean we need to sacrifice quality and ambience.”

Kosher Delight is the third kosher restaurant in Manhattan to close down this year. Clubhouse Cafe, owned by the Le Marais restaurant, closed last week. According to Klein, Clubhouse was forced out by a new owner who is turning the building into a mall.

Klein says Clubhouse is looking for a new location and the owners expect to rebuild in half-a-year.

J2 Pizza, which billed itself as “The Most Famous Kosher Pizza Place in the World” and whose wall was littered with pictures of famous celebrities who visited the midtown restaurant, left their pervious location and moved to 35th street and 5th and 6th avenue.

Klein claims that this was also due to a rent increase combined with being shut down several times for health code violations. The restaurant now operates under the name “The Jerusalem Cafe.”

“J2 was very much affected by the neighboring restaurants,” said Zechariah Mehler. “Plus they had been shut down so many times by the New York Board of Health, they knew that their name needed to be changed for them to survive. As if that would make us forget their there salad bar lacked a sneeze guard.”

Michael Orbach

Kosher Delight in Midtown NY Closing

Friday, June 15th, 2012

YeahThatsKosher.com reports that Kosher Delight, the 28-year old establishment on Broadway between 36th and 37th street is scheduled to close on Sunday, according to rumors and the restaurant’s staff. This closing comes on the heels of two other recent closures/moves in the midtown area, J2 Pizza and Clubhouse Cafe.

According to the website, Kosher Delight has recently been charged with violations of the City’s health code. During the most recent inspection, last month, seven violations were identified, according to the NY Restaurant Report. Two were classified as minor, and five major.

On its previous inspection, the restaurant received a deduction of 12 points and a grade of A, and had 4 violations. Over the four years for which we have published records, Kosher Delight has been written up for 49 violations.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Saudis Outraged by McDonald’s Toy They Believe to be Insulting to Muhammed

Monday, May 28th, 2012

Saudi Arabians are angry at a McDonald’s toy which they say mocks their prophet Muhammad. According to a report appearing Sunday, May 27th on the Arabic news website, Kermalkom.com, the McDonald’s fast food restaurant “abused the Prophet Muhammad by placing his name at the base of a toy that is being distributed as part of the Happy Meal, a toy which steps on the name ‘Muhammad.'” The toy consists of a blue superhero figurine (apparently a Power Ranger Samurai; click here for pictures). It stands on one leg, and, when the lever is pressed, it pounds on the base with the other leg. According to the Saudis, the designs that appear all around the base, where the figurine stomps its foot, is really the name “Muhammad” written several times in circles.

The toy had been distributed a few days before Saudi children and their parents began to take note of the name. Soon thereafter, Saudi Muslims launched several campaigns against McDonald’s in “response to the savage attacks on the noble Prophet,” under banners like “Help your Prophet!” and “Together in support of the Prophet.”

Saudis, “demanding the strongest possible punishment for the restaurant” and insisting that “they will not be silent until this is realized,” further complained how such an obvious insult could pass the supervision of the management at McDonalds.

In response, “Saudi McDonald’s” has withdrawn the toy from all its restaurants, “in order to safeguard against any accusations or misunderstandings.”
Originally published by Gatestone Institute http://www.gatestoneinstitute.org

Raymond Ibrahim

Former Ratner’s Building at 100 Norfolk Sold for $8.8 Million

Tuesday, May 1st, 2012

The website Bowery Boogie reported that the building at 100 Norfolk Street, on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, has been sold for an all-cash sum of $8.8 million (6% above ask).

The unconfirmed buyer, believed to be Brooklyn-based Urban-Scape, negotiated air rights from adjoining buildings and will be constructing a 44,000 square-foot condo (12 stories).

The previous owner of 100 Norfolk was Ratner’s, the world famous Kosher dairy restaurant which went under a decade ago.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/former-ratners-building-at-100-norfolk-sold-for-8-8-million/2012/05/01/

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