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April 21, 2014 / 21 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘rocks’

Now You See Them, Now You Don’t

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

Camouflaged IDF fighter jets fly low and fast inside the Ramon Crater in the Negev Desert.

Hundreds of millions of years ago, the Negev desert was covered by an ocean. Slowly, it receded northwards, leaving behind a hump-shaped hill. The hump was slowly flattened by water and climatic forces.

Five million years ago, give or take a year, the Arava Rift Valley was formed, with rivers changing their courses, carving out the inside of the crater which was a softer rock than that overlying. The crater bottom continued to deepen at a much faster rate than the surrounding walls, which gradually increased in height.

As the crater deepened, more layers of ancient rock were exposed with rocks at the bottom of the crater being up to 200 million years old. Today, the crater is 500 meters deep with the deepest point being Ein Saharonim (Saharonim Spring) which also contains the crater’s only natural water source which sustain much of the wildlife.

We have no idea how those two jets were made…

PA Child Terror Leader Sentenced, Released

Wednesday, May 30th, 2012

An Israeli military court Tuesday sentenced  Bassem al-Tamimi, a 45 year old Palestinian man who encourages Palestinian youth to attack Israeli soldiers with projectiles, was sentenced to 13 months in jail.

Al-Tamimi, who garnered the support of the European Union, which criticized Israel for imprisoning him, was released after the trial, having served all 13 months while awaiting trial.

Al-Tamimi’s tactics have been called child abuse by some, who accuse him of manipulating children to endanger themselves and others in a street war against Israel.  Amnesty International called al-Tamimi a “prisoner of conscience,’’ and celebrated him as a protest leader.

As of Late Friday Afternoon, ‘Global March on Jerusalem’ Fails to Ignite Mass Clashes with Police, Army

Friday, March 30th, 2012

Attempts by rioters throwing rocks at Israel Defense Force soldiers to conduct a ‘Global March to Jerusalem’ have, for the most part, been thwarted by Israeli authorities, who have maintained secure national borders and checkpoints inside the country on ‘Land Day’.

Organizers intended for a million Arabs from Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, and Egypt to infiltrate Israel’s borders and Palestinian Authority and Israeli Arabs to riot against Israeli army and law enforcement officers, with a goal of overcoming the obstacles to reach Jerusalem.

Beefed up security forces deployed on Israel’s borders and in sensitive locations throughout the country  remain on high alert, as news outlets from around the Arab world report that demonstrators are continuing to amass on Israel’s borders. Reports emanating from Jordan state that almost 20,000 people have gathered in order to converge on the Israeli border. Lebanese newspapers report that over 100 buses will be transporting Lebanese and Palestinian demonstrators to the Lebanese border.

More than a dozen Arabs have been arrested for throwing rocks at police near the Damascus Gate in Jerusalem’s old city (video by IDF Spokesperson’s Office).

Rioters Hurling Firebombs at IDF Forces in Bethlehem

 


AFP reported that more than 15,000 demonstrators in Jordan, waving Jordanian and Palestinian flags and carrying banners reading “Freedom for Jerusalem and freedom for Palestine,” and “Jerusalem, here we come,” joined in a peaceful sit-in at Kafrein, six miles from the border with Israel on Friday. Among them were opposition Islamist leaders and trade unionists,

“We will not forget you Jerusalem. Down with the Wadi Araba agreement,” they chanted, referring to the 1994 peace treaty between Jordan and Israel.

At the Kalandia checkpoint, north of Jerusalem, clashes began at around 12:30, after mosque Friday prayers. Dozens of young Palestinians threw stones at security forces manning the checkpoint.

Soldiers utilized the “screamer,”  which transmitts very high frequency sound to keep the rioters, and the “skunk,” which showered protesters with a liquid reminiscent of a stink-bomb.

A Hamas member of the Palestinian parliament, Ahmed Atun, who was expelled from Jerusalem a few months ago, received a light head injury and required treatment.

According to a report by Ynet, Palestinian politician Mustafa Barghouti was injured by a tear gas canister that struck him in the head, and was taken to a hospital in Ramallah for treatment.

The PLO Executive Committee has encouraged the protests, saying they are necessary “to affirm the Arab and Palestinian character of Jerusalem.”

The committee insisted that the only solution to the conflict would be the establishment of Jerusalem as the eternal capital of an independent Palestine.

“The land was and remains the essence of the conflict,” the committee continued. “Our people’s main battle is over the land.”

 

 

 

 

Fear and Loathing on the Mount of Olives

Tuesday, February 28th, 2012

On Friday, February 24, I had the honor of guiding a distinguished group on a tour of the Mount of Olives cemetery in eastern Jerusalem. The group included two U.S. congressmen – Eliot Engel (D-N.Y.) and Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), Malcolm Hoenlein, executive vice chairman of the Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations, and Rabbis Abraham and Menachem Lubinsky, who have spearheaded the International Committee for the Preservation of the Mount of Olives.

I live near the cemetery in a Jewish enclave on the Mount of Olives in the mostly Arab neighborhood of Ras El Amud, across the valley from the Old City.

As we toured the ancient graveyard, I pointed out the layers of Jewish history before us. The Mount of Olives is the oldest existing Jewish cemetery, with 150,000 graves spanning 3,000 years. The biblical prophets Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi lie alongside modern day heroes like Henrietta Szold, the founder of Hadassah, Eliezer Ben Yehuda, who resurrected the modern Hebrew language, and Rabbi Shlomo Goren, chief rabbi of the IDF during the liberation of the Old City of Jerusalem and Hebron in the Six-Day War.

There are also signs of great pain. We saw the mass grave of forty-eight fighters who died trying to defend the Old City, which eventually fell to Jordan in the War of Independence. Those brave warriors’ bodies remained in the Jordanian-occupied Old City until 1967, when Rabbi Goren properly interred them in the cemetery. We also saw the remnants of the forty-thousand graves destroyed or vandalized in the 19 years of Jordanian occupation. In those years many Jewish headstones were used as Jordanian paving and building material.

Today, grave desecration is recurring at the Mount of Olives cemetery and the group saw firsthand the continuing travesty in the form of freshly smashed tombs and broken headstones.

But all is not dark. I told the group about the attempts at co-existence in our area. I showed the visitors Arab schools built by the Jerusalem municipality. I talked about shopping in Arab stores, being treated by Arab doctors, and talking Koran or Torah over coffee with my Arab neighbors.

I described my attempts to be neighborly and how I search for Arabs who want to live with us in decency and mutual respect. I reminded my audience that polls show that given the choice, some 70 percent of Arabs living in eastern Jerusalem would prefer living under Israeli sovereignty than under another flag.

As we came down the mountain, we entered my neighborhood’s traffic circle and stood in front of the mosque that has been cited for zoning violations as part of a large unauthorized expansion. I explained that I walk in this traffic circle daily and that while things seem calm right now, a Jihadist influence has radicalized some of the population and that violence can erupt at any moment.

Suddenly, as if on cue, rocks began to fly. The nature of these quick and life-threatening moments is that different participants can have disparate recollections of the details. I saw two projectiles for certain: one cement block hit a security vehicle and a stone flew in our direction, narrowly missing the group and the congressmen. Security personnel reacted quickly, drawing their weapons, but they were not as quick as the culprits, who escaped down into the Silwan neighborhood.

The group took the attack in stride, and the congressmen did not budge. I explained to them that while there is danger here, it should not translate automatically into fear. There are toxic elements that want to instill fear in our nation and in our neighborhoods so that we Jews will back off our 3,000-year-old claim to Jerusalem. They want us to be afraid to stand on this street corner but we won’t let those elements bully us like they do their own people, forcing our Arab neighbors to get in line and brainwash their children with hate.

As bad as the violent incident was, the distortion on the part of some commentators later showed how pernicious the hate is. One Jewish anti-Israel blogger basically called me a racist – and a provocateur for walking the streets of municipal Jerusalem. This blogger ironically accused me of planning to Judaize the Mount of Olives through ethnic cleansing while at the same time justifying the rock throwing and violence that is precisely aimed at driving Jews from the area.

His rhetoric mirrored the ugly words of the emir of Qatar, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al-Thani, who stated at the International Conference for Defense of Jerusalem in Doha: “We must act quickly to stop the Judaization of Jerusalem.”

He is right. We must act quickly. But we must act quickly to stop the toxic, peace-hating terrorists so that normal life for Jews and Arabs can become a reality. If the Doha-sponsored Jihad-friendly outlook wins the day, Jews would once again be evicted from the Mount of Olives, graves would once again be desecrated, and the Arabs living in those areas would be subjected to yet another repressive Middle Eastern regime.

Police: Arab Attack on IDF Soldiers – Case of Mistaken Identity

Sunday, February 26th, 2012

There has been a dramatic development in the investigation of the violent assault on two soldiers on Shabbat in Haifa. Channel 2 News reports that Police believe the attack was not carried out for nationalist reasons – as they had originally assumed – but resulted instead from mistaken identity.

Two youths were arrested overnight, and another four have been behind bars since yesterday. In interrogating the six suspects, police found that minutes before the violent attack, rocks had been thrown at the homes of the assailants, near Rambam Hospital in Haifa, and they went out into the street to take revenge. The two soldiers just happened to be at the wrong place at the wrong time.

Still, the account of the attack that was given by the two victims, both IDF soldiers in civilian clothing, was rife with descriptions of anti-Semitic slurs. Thus, whether those Arab assailants were out for Jewish blood or were merely looking to murder whomever dared throw rocks at their homes, the outcome is still extremely worrisome.

National Union Chairman MK Jacob “Ketzale” Katz this morning referred to the Haifa incident with strong language . “The Likud government headed by Netanyahu and Barak  failed,” he told Arutz 7. “If after 62 years of independence, anti-Semitic lynching takes place in downtown Haifa, it is clear to all that the Jewish people’s ability to deter such attacks has collapsed.”

Arab Youths Attack IDF in East Jerusalem

Wednesday, February 1st, 2012

Arab youths violently attacked Israeli security forces in the east Jerusalem neighborhood of Issawiya on Wednesday, resulting in scores of injuries to both sides, according to the Palestinian news agency Ma’an.

The violence reportedly broke out as the IDF was arresting a resident for hurling rocks at IDF soldiers.

Israeli Police Arrest 5 Suspected of Rock Attacks

Monday, January 30th, 2012

Israeli police arrested five Arabs from Silwan accused of being members of a local gang that has been attacking police with rocks.

According to police, the self-proclaimed Milad Ayyish Battalion threw rocks and firecrackers at Israeli police and border patrol in scores of incidents over the past year and a half, causing damage to police jeeps and patrol cars. Milad Ayyish was a 17-year-old gang-member killed during the Nakba Day riots last May.

Three of the five suspects  are under 18.

 

The Most Important Things In Life Are Invisible

Tuesday, September 21st, 2010

In today’s world of mounting pressures and continuous change, we need to take a few minutes to reset our perspectives and figure out what matters most.

Each stage in life is fraught with challenging – challenges that have the potential to make or break us. Life is all about choices – and when we know what is essential, our hard work and energy gets streamlined in a crystal-clear path to help us achieve what we want most.

Most of us, at least to some degree, are guilty of wasting time focusing on the trivial things; we let ourselves be blinded by all the power, prestige and material things that seem to surround us. And once we lose focus, we tend to forget the significant things, such as our relationships and our own personal development. Often we channel so much of our energy and time into matters that, in the long run, don’t really matter. Running late for work, someone cracking the bumper of our car or getting the wrong item in a long awaited package may cause us a lot of distress. Stressing out about having nothing to wear, what other people think about us or making sure we do everything we can to keep up with the latest fashions can keep our mind whirring for hours. Perhaps we have been spending too much time at the office, in front of the computer or the TV and haven’t been able to take the time to focus on what really matters.

Imagine if there were a bank which credits your account each morning with $86,400, carries over no balance from day-to-day and allows you to keep a zero cash balance. What would you do? You would draw out every dollar, of course!

Well, each of us has such a bank; its name is Life and its currency is time. Every morning, it credits each of us with 86,400 seconds. Every night it writes off, as lost, whatever time we have failed to invest towards a valuable purpose. It carries over no balance; it allows no overdraft. Each day it opens a new account for us; each night it burns the records of the day.

If we fail to use the day’s deposits of our imaginary bank account, the loss is ours; there is no going back, there is no drawing against “tomorrow.” Therefore, we would empty out every dollar and buy the most precious of items. Same too in life, we must draw out every minute and spend it in the best way possible.

Often it takes a wake up call to help us reprioritize. Events such as a job loss, a new baby, being diagnosed with a terminal illness, a birthday or a near-death experience tend to hit us like a ton of bricks. These wake up calls make us stop and consider what s truly important. Very often we realize that we have had our priorities mixed up. When that happens we can set our priorities by separating that which is important from those things which don’t hold much significance.

After graduating from nursing school, Daniella started work in the operating room of a local hospital. She was very enthusiastic about her new career; she worked tirelessly during her long shifts and was enthusiastic about every task she performed. However, like with many new jobs, the novelty soon wore off and she found herself in a slump.

One night, while working a double shift, Daniella was feeling aggravated – she didn’t like the doctor she was working with, her feet hurt, it was late, and she was “doing eyes.” Every operating nurse has a preferred, and least preferred, body part to operate on, Daniella most disliked operating on the eyes-she felt that these operations were both boring and repulsive.

Her patient that night was an elderly man; he was there to have his cataract removed and new lenses implanted. When the procedure was completed, Daniella started to pull the bandages off to put drops in the patient’s eyes. As she was pulling off the bandages the patient made instant eye contact with her.

“I can see!!!” he exclaimed emphatically and excitedly, “And you are beautiful!”

At that moment Daniella realized what a truly significant thing she had just done. She realized what this meant to the patient and how truly grateful he was. She helped him see! She quickly mumbled some response to him about how he must still be feeling the effects of the anxiety medications. However, he adamantly proclaimed again, “No, you really are beautiful!”

Daniella no longer felt tired, her leg pain seemed to disappear. She had helped him see and that was a truly beautiful thing. Daniella realized that she had not understood what true beauty really was. There was nothing repulsive about the work she was doing – helping another human being was a beautiful thing.

Every moment in life counts and if we spend our moments worrying about, or even merely thinking about, matters of little significance, then we are losing precious time that we could have used to move us in a positive direction in our life. Will it matter what we were wearing today ten years from now?

A philosophy professor stood before his class with some items on a table in front of him. When the class began, he wordlessly picked up a large and empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with rocks.

He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.

So the professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles, of course, rolled into the open areas between the rocks.

He then asked the students again if the jar was full. They agreed it was.

The professor picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else.

He then asked once more if the jar was full. The students responded with a unanimous “Yes.”

“Now,” said the professor, “I want you to recognize that this jar represents your life. The rocks are the important things – your family, your partner, your health, your children – things that if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full.

The pebbles are the other things that matter – like your job, your house, your car.

The sand is everything else. The small stuff.”

“If you put the sand into the jar first,” he continued, “there is no room for the pebbles or the rocks. The same goes for your life.

If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff, you will never have room for the things that are important to you. Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness. Play with your children. Take your partner out for a walk. There will always be time to go to work, clean the house, give a dinner party and fix the disposal.

Take care of the rocks first – the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.”

Focusing on what truly matters is what truly matters. Remember, life, this incredible gift from Hashem, is what we make of it. Our life account has a limited capacity, there is only so much time deposited for us each day, let’s be sure to invest it wisely.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/family/parenting-our-children/the-most-important-things-in-life-are-invisible-2/2010/09/21/

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