web analytics
December 11, 2016 / 11 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Rosh Chodesh’

Parshas Mishpatim

Wednesday, February 15th, 2012

Vol. LXIII No. 7 5772

New York City CANDLE LIGHTING TIME

February 17, 2012 – 24 Shevat 5772

5:12 p.m. NYC E.S.T.

Sabbath Ends: 6:20 p.m. NYC E.S.T.

Weekly Reading: Mishpatim

Weekly Haftara: Ben Sheva Shanim (Ashkenazim: II Kings 12:1-17; Sephardim: II Kings 11:17-12:17)

Daf Yomi: Temurah 2

Mishna Yomit: Bezah 5:7 – Rosh Hashanah 1:1

Halacha Yomit: Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 11:7-9

Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Edus chap. 11-13

Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin: 5:53 a.m.NYC E.S.T.

Latest Kerias Shema: 9:29 a.m. NYC E.S.T.

This Shabbos is Shabbos Mevarchim. Rosh Chodesh Adar is two days, this coming Thursday and Friday. The molad is Wednesday morning, 49 minutes, 1 chelek (a chelek is 1/18 of a minute) after 8:00 a.m. (in Jerusalem). It is also Shabbos Parashas Shekalim.

Shabbos morning: Shacharis as usual. We remove two Torah scrolls from the ark and call seven aliyos. We read Parashas Mishpatim in the first scroll. We then call the Maftir and read Parashas KiTissa from the beginning of the parasha until Al Nafshoseichem in the second scroll. We then read the Haftara of Parashas Shekalim, Ben Sheva Shanim (II Kings 11:17-12:17 for Sephardim; II Kings 12:1-17 for Ashkenazim).

We bless the month of Adar. We do not say Av Harachamim, nor is there Hazkaras Neshamos, but we continue with Ashrei; we return the Torah scroll to the aron and the chazzan says half-Kaddish. Rosh Chodesh, Wednesday: Maariv, Atah we add Ya’aleh VeYavo. However, if one forgot to include Ya’aleh VeYavo – at Maariv only – one does not repeat; see Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 422:1, based on Berachos 30b, which explains that this is due to the fact that we do not sanctify the month at night. Following the Shemoneh Esreh, the chazzan recites Kaddish Tiskabbel, followed by Aleinu and Kaddish Yasom.

Thursday morning: Shacharis with inclusion of Ya’aleh VeYavo in the Shemoneh Esreh. Following chazzan’s repetition we say half-Hallel, Kaddish Tiskabbel. We take out one Sefer Torah. We read in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:1-15) and call four aliyos (Kohen, Levi, Yisrael, Yisrael); the Baal Keriah recites half-Kaddish. We return the Torah to the aron, Ashrei, U’va Letziyyon – we delete La’menatze’ach, the chazzan recites half-Kaddish; all then remove their tefillin. Mussaf of Rosh Chodesh, followed by chazzan’s repetition and Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, Shir Shel Yom, Borchi Nafshi and their respective Kaddish recitals (for mourners). Nusach Sefarad say Shir Shel Yom and Borchi Nafshi after half-Hallel. Before Aleinu they add Ein K’Elokeinu with Kaddish DeRabbanan.

Mincha: In the Shemoneh Esreh we say Ya’aleh VeYavo, followed by chazzan’s repetition and Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu and Mourner’s Kaddish.

Birkas Hamazon: In the Grace after Meals we add Ya’aleh VeYavo as well as mention of Rosh Chodesh in the Beracha Acharona (Me’ein Shalosh) at all times.

Thursday eve. and Friday, 2nd day Rosh Chodesh, the order of the day is the same as on the preceding day. Kiddush Levana at first opportunity (we usually wait until Motza’ei Shabbos).

The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by many congregations and Yeshivos for our brothers and sisters in Eretz Yisrael: Chapter 83, 130, 142. –Y.K.

Rabbi Yaakov Klass

Parshas Va’era

Friday, January 20th, 2012

Vol. LXIII No. 3 5772

New York City CANDLE LIGHTING TIME

January 20, 2012 – 25 Teves 5772 4:38 p.m. NYC E.S.T.

Sabbath Ends: 5:48 p.m. NYC E.S.T.

Weekly Reading: Va’era

Weekly Haftara: Koh Amar Hashem (Ezekiel 28:25-29:21)

Daf Yomi: Arachin 7

Mishna Yomit: Sukkah 4:4-5

Halacha Yomit: Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 3:7-9

Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Malveh v’Loveh chap. 7-9

Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin: 6:17 a.m. NYC E.S.T.

Latest Kerias Shema: 9:41 a.m. NYC E.S.T.

This coming Wednesday is Rosh Chodesh Shevat, one day.

The molad is Monday, 5 minutes after 8:00 p.m. (in Jerusalem).

Tuesday evening: At Maariv we add Ya’aleh VeYavo. However, if one forgot to include Ya’aleh VeYavo (at Maariv only) one does not repeat (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 422:1, based on Berachos 30b, which explains that this is due to the fact that we do not sanctify the month at night). Following the Shemoneh Esreh, the chazzan recites Kaddish Tiskabbel followed by Aleinu and Kaddish Yasom.

Wednesday morning: Shacharis with inclusion of Ya’aleh VeYavo in the Shemoneh Esreh, (no Tachanun,) half Hallel, Kaddish Tiskabbel. We take out one Sefer Torah from the Ark. We read in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:1-15), we call four Aliyos (Kohen, Levi, Yisrael, Yisrael), the Ba’al Keriah recites half Kaddish. We return the Torah to the Ark; Ashrei, U’va LeTziyyon – we delete Lamenatze’ach, the chazzan recites half Kaddish; all then remove their tefillin.

Musaf of Rosh Chodesh, followed by chazzan’s repetition and Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, Shir Shel Yom, Borchi Nafshi and their respective Kaddish recitals (for mourners). Nusach Sefarad say Shir Shel Yom and Borchi Nafshi after Hallel. Before Aleinu they add Ein K’Elokeinu with Kaddish DeRabbanan.

Mincha: In the Shemoneh Esreh we say Ya’aleh VeYavo, followed by chazzan’s repetition (no Tachanun,) and Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu and Mourner’s Kaddish.

Birkas Hamazon: In the Grace after Meals we add Ya’aleh VeYavo as well as mention of Rosh Chodesh in Beracha Acharona (Me’ein Shalosh) at all times.

Kiddush Levana at first opportunity (we usually wait until Motza’ei Shabbos).

The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by many congregations and yeshivos for our brothers and sisters in Eretz Yisrael: Chapter 83, 130, 142. – Y.K.

Rabbi Yaakov Klass

My Machberes

Wednesday, January 4th, 2012

Igud Rosh Chodesh At Kingsbrook

On Monday, Rosh Chodesh Teves – the sixth day of Chanukah, December 26 – more than thirty member rabbis convened at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center in Brooklyn to participate in the Rosh Chodesh Conference of the Rabbinical Alliance of America-Igud Horabbonim. Speakers included Rabbi Noach Bernstein, Rabbi Michoel Chazan, Rabbi Yaakov Spivak, Rabbi Yehuda Levin, and this writer.

Rabbi Chazan, chaplain of Kingsbrook, described the invaluable work being done by the chaplaincy staff. He told of a volunteer who attended to elderly patients at the hospital, particularly in helping them with their tefillin for daily prayers. The volunteer sought the blessing of Rabbi Yoel Teitelbaum, zt”l (1886-1979), Satmar Rebbe. The Rebbe encouraged the volunteer to continue his good work and blessed him with long life. The volunteer lived into his late 90s. His work is being continued today by his son. Rabbi Chazan also noted that the greatly respected Bikur Cholim of Satmar began its citywide mission and operations at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center.

This writer, in his capacity as Igud director and rav of B’nai Israel of Linden Heights, called for the re-staffing and re-empowerment of New York State’s Kosher Law Enforcement under the direction of Rabbi Luzer Weiss. New York has become synonymous with kosher food, and kosher consumers today include vegetarians, the lactose intolerant, Hindus, observant Jews and others. Any erosion in the perception of kosher quality will hurt New York’s kosher food production as well as its economy.

A resolution was unanimously approved urging the governor and the state legislature to embolden and increase the office of Kosher Law Enforcement, led by the universally respected Rabbi Luzer Weiss, thus ensuring that the state’s kosher food industry would continue to grow – a critical consideration in this time of increasing unemployment.

Rabbi Yaakov Spivak, rav and rosh kollel of Ashyel Avraham in Monsey as well as a columnist and radio and TV commentator, focused on the dangers of smoking. In 1964, Rabbi Moshe Feinstein, zt”l (1893-1986), author of Igros Moshe, did not prohibit smoking “in particular because a number of great Torah sages, in past generations and in our own, smoke” (see Igros Moshe, Yoreh Deah 2:49 [1964]; Yoreh Deah 3:35 [1973]; and Choshen Mishpat 2:76 [1981]).

This, plainly, was because those venerable sages did not yet know that smoking was dangerous. On the contrary, smoking tobacco was perceived as beneficial and healthful. Indeed, when Rabbi Israel Meir Hakohen, zt”l (1838-1933), author of Chofetz Chaim and Mishnah Berurah, heard from doctors that smoking was dangerous for those who are “weak,” he ruled that, even if one is addicted, it is necessary to stop.

Rabbi Spivak stressed that no one is permitted to begin smoking – especially young yeshiva students. Rabbi Spivak called on Torah leaders to take the initiative in stopping smoking by our youths.

Students who earned their semicha at Kollel Ashyel Avraham and are now Igud member rabbis presented Rabbi Spivak, their Torah mentor, with a plaque expressing their deep appreciation of his Torah leadership and guidance. Rabbi Spivak and the other rabbis present were moved by the expression of deep, heartfelt appreciation.

Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center is located at 585 Schenectady Avenue in the East Flatbush section of central Brooklyn, moments away from Crown Heights. It was founded in 1925 as a chronic care facility to serve the Jewish community within a cultural context.

As the community has evolved and diversified, Kingsbrook has expanded its services and programs to meet the needs of the area’s large, culturally diverse communities. The rabbis met in the Chaim Albert Synagogue, which serves as a full service synagogue as well as the Jewish chapel for the hospital. The high vaulted ceiling and tall stained glass windows with more than 7,000 memorial name plaques adorning its walls, some dating back to 1873, confirm the shul’s status as an emblem of the community’s rich Jewish history, recalling the time when great rabbis lived in a thriving Jewish neighborhood.

Kosher Chaplains

In 2006, a number of observant Jewish chaplains serving at medical facilities throughout the United States and Canada joined to participate in the first Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) course specially tailored for observant Jews.

Successful completion of the CPE course by chaplains is desired by hospitals and medical establishments. However, since the regular presentation of the course does not address issues that affect observant Jewish patients, who are dealt with by observant chaplains on a daily basis, a special presentation was organized by Rabbi Chazan. Rabbi Chazan is also director of the Central Council of Rabbinical Chaplains (CCRC). In these capacities, Rabbi Chazan is the dynamic leader of observant chaplaincy services throughout the United States.

In 2008, CCRC held a gathering at Kingsbrook’s aforementioned chapel. More than 30 rabbinical chaplains from the tri-state area participated. Keynote speaker at the event was Rabbi Dr. Avraham Twerski, renowned spiritual leader, psychiatrist, therapist, and author. Rabbi Twerski addressed many issues and concerns that confront hospital rabbinical-chaplains daily.

Rabbi Gershon Tannenbaum

Mitzvah Shopping

Thursday, December 22nd, 2011

He must be a very important person to get such an important mitzvah, I heard them say, as Mr. Loewenstein, the local assemblyman, stepped up to recite the Torah blessing before the reading of the Ten Commandments. And Mr. Kleppish was too embarrassed to tell his wife that he only got third galilah on Shabbat Rosh Chodesh Chanukah.

Meanwhile, in the neighborhood shtiebel, Maftir was sold for $500 and petichah was sold for $20. Do we know which mitzvah is more important than another? Should we give priority to an “important” mitzvah over an “unimportant” mitzvah?

Thinking about the kohen performing the rituals of the daily morning sacrifice provides us with an illustrative answer. Which mitzvah was he to perform first? The distinguished task of preparing the menorah for the evening kindling, or the menial task of sweeping the altar from yesterday’s ashes? First he swept off the ashes and then he prepared the menorah. Because, explains Resh Lakish, the altar was closer to the door through which the kohen entered the sanctuary than the menorah, so that the kohen reached the altar first. “Ein maavirin al hamitzvot” – do not offend a mitzvah by postponing it, says Resh Lakish. First do the mitzvah that first comes your way.

Even if the mitzvah that first comes your way is considered by the halacha to be less holy than the second, most agree that the less holy mitzvah should be performed first. The tefillin shel rosh is holier than the tefillin shel yad because it has more letters of God’s name on it than the teffilin shel yad. Yet the tefillin shel yad is put on first.

This, explains Rashi, is because the arm is closer to the hand than to the head. For the same reason, explain the Tosafists, when replacing the tefillin back in their bag, the tefillin shel rosh should not be placed on top of the tefillin shel yad, for by doing so one would violate the rule of ein maavirim al hamitzvot. This is because the tefillin shel rosh would have to be put aside the next morning while the tefillin shel yad was being donned first, in order to comply with the sequence in which the Torah introduces them, “Bind these words as a sign on your hand and let them be an emblem in the center of your head.” Similarly, when reciting the verse “You open Your hand and satisfy the need of every human being,” the tefillin shel yad should be touched first.

The correct order for donning tallit and tefillin is tallit first and then tefillin. This order respects the rule of maalim bekodesh, ascend in the order of holiness. The rule of maalim bekodesh gives way, however, to the rule of ein maavirim al hamitzvot in the following situation: If one pulls the tefillin out of the bag before the tallit, then according to the Shulchan Aruch, tefillin should be donned first in order not to violate the rule of ein maavirim al hamitzvot. In order to avoid this conflict, the tallit should be put back in the bag on top of the tefillin. The correct order for reading the Torah on Chanukah Rosh Chodesh Tevet is first the portion of Rosh Chodesh and then the portion of Chanukah.

This order respects the rule of tadir kodem – perform first the mitzvah that occurs with higher frequency. The rule of tadir kodem gives way, however, to the rule of ein maavirim al hamitzvot in the following situation: If, according to the Taz, one mistakenly began reading the Chanukah portion first, he should, in order not to violate the rule of ein maavirim al hamitzvot, not interrupt this reading with the Rosh Chodesh reading.

The Radvaz was once asked whether a prisoner who was given a one-day furlough each year should take it at the earliest opportunity or wait for Yom Kippur. After all, on Yom Kippur one can perform more important mitzvot. Based on the precept of ein maavirim al hamitzvot, he ruled that the prisoner should take it now even though it was an ordinary weekday. The Chacham Zvi disagreed. If you can be certain, he says, that the authorities will not change their minds, it is preferable to wait for Yom Kippur.

Raphael Grunfeld’s book “Ner Eyal on Seder Moed” (distributed by Mesorah) is available at OU.org and your local Judaica bookstore. His new book, “Ner Eyal on Seder Nashim & Nezikin,” will be available shortly. Any comments to the writer are welcome at rafegrunfeld@gmail.com.

Raphael Grunfeld

Parshas Miketz

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

Vol. LXII No. 51 5772
New York City CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
Dec. 23, 2011 – 27 Kislev 5772
4:13 p.m. NYC E.S.T.

Sabbath Ends: 5:24 p.m. NYC E.S.T.
Weekly Reading: Miketz
Weekly Haftara: Roni VeSimchi (Zechariah 2:14-4:7)
Daf Yomi: Bechoros 39
Mishna Yomit: Yoma 6:5-6
Halacha Yomit: Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 207:2-6
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Mechirah chap. 19-21
Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin: 6:18 a.m. NYC E.S.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 9:37 a.m. NYC E.S.T.

This Shabbos is Shabbos Mevarchim. We bless the new month of Teves. Rosh Chodesh is two days, Monday and Tuesday. The molad is Sunday morning, 20 minutes and 17 chalakim (a chelek is 1/18 of a minute) after 7:00 a.m. (in Jerusalem).

This is Shabbos Chanukah as well. Friday night we light the Chanukah candles first, and then the Shabbos candles. We use larger candles or more oil to assure that these candles, which we lit earlier, remain lit at least a half hour after shekia. Following Shacharis we recite whole Hallel. We then take out two Sifrei Torah: in the first we read from Parashas Miketz, we call up 7 aliyos. We then place both Sifrei Torah on the bimah and recite half Kaddish. Following the Hagbaha, we read the Maftir in Parashas Naso, from Vayehi Beyom Chalos Moshe (Bamidbar 7:42-47). Haftara same as above. We do not say Av Harachamim. Otherwise the order continues as usual, with the exception of the inclusion of Al Hanissim in the Musaf Shemoneh Esreh. We conclude the service with Mizmor Shir Chanukas Habayis. Mincha: usual Kerias Hatorah, then we add Al Hanissim in the Shemoneh Esreh. At Maariv we say Vi’yehi Noam. Motza’ei Shabbos, in shul we first light Chanukah candles, then Havdala. At home the order is reversed.

The order of the day for Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday (the last day of Chanukah) is as follows: in the Shemoneh Esreh and Birkas Hamazon we say Al Hanissim, no Tachanun or E-l Erech Appayim, whole Hallel followed by half Kaddish (except on Rosh Chodesh, when we say whole Kaddish and Musaf). We then read from the Torah, beginning [on the fourth day] in Parashas Naso (Bamidbar 7:30), each day the first two Aliyos from the Nasi of that day. The third Aliya is from the Nasi of the following day. On the eighth day, the third Aliya concludes in the beginning of Parashas Beha’aloscha (Bamidbar 8:4), half Kaddish, no Yehi Ratzon. After the Torah reading we say Ashrei, U’va LeTziyyon, we omit Lamenatze’ach and at the usual conclusion of tefilla we add Mizmor Shir Chanukas Habayis.

Rosh Chodesh Teves (two days this coming Monday and Tuesday): Sunday evening; Maariv, we add Ya’aleh VeYavo as well as Al Hanissim.

Monday morning: Shacharis we add Ya’aleh VeYavo as well as Al Hanissim. Since it is Chanukah we recite whole Hallel, we then call the first three aliyos and read from Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:1-15) and the fourth aliyah from the Nasi of that day (Bayom Hashi’shi – Bamidbar 7:42-47) followed by Musaf of Rosh Chodesh. Tuesday second day Rosh Chodesh same as yesterday.

Kiddush Levana at first opportunity, or at the latest until Tuesday January 10th at night.

The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by many congregations and Yeshivos for our brothers and sisters in Eretz Yisrael: Chapter 83, 130, 142. – Y.K.

Rabbi Yaakov Klass

Parshas Toldos

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

Vol. LXII No. 47                             5772

 

New York City

CANDLE LIGHTING TIME

November 25, 2011 – 28 Cheshvan 5772

4:11 p.m. NYC E.S.T.

 

Sabbath Ends: 5:20 p.m. NYC E.S.T.

Weekly Reading: Toldos

Weekly Haftara: Machar Chodesh (I Samuel 20:18-42)

Daf Yomi: Bechoros 11

Mishna Yomit: Shekalim 7:3-4

Halacha Yomit: Kitzur Shulchan Aruch, 195:14 –196:4

Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Mikva’os  chap. 8-10

Earliest time for tallis and tefillin: 5:58 a.m. NYC E.S.T.

Latest Kerias Shema: 9:20 a.m. NYC E.S.T.

 

This Shabbos is Shabbos Mevorchim, Rosh Chodesh Kislev is (1 day) this coming Sunday. The Molad is Friday evening 36 minutes and 16 Chalakim (a chelek is 1/18 of a minute) past 6:00 pm [in Jerusalem].

                         Rosh Chodesh Kislev: Motza’ei Shabbos at Maariv we add Ya’aleh VeYavo. However, if one forgot to include Ya’aleh VeYavo (at Maariv only) one does not repeat (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 422:1, based on Berachos 30b, which explains that this is due to the fact that we do not sanctify the month at night). Following the Shemoneh Esreh, the chazzan recites half-Kaddish. We then say Viyehi Noam and Ve’Ata Kadosh. The chazzan then recites Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, Kaddish Yasom.

Sunday morning: Shacharis with inclusion of Ya’aleh VeYavo in the Shemoneh Esreh, half Hallel, Kaddish Tiskabbel. We take out one Sefer Torah. We read in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:1-15), we call four Aliyos (Kohen, Levi, Yisrael, Yisrael), the Baal Keria recites half- Kaddish. We return the Torah to the Aron, Ashrei, U’va Letziyyon – we delete La’menatze’ach – the chazzan recites half- Kaddish; all then remove their tefillin.

                        Musaf of Rosh Chodesh, followed by Reader’s repetition and Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, Shir Shel Yom, Borchi Nafshi and their respective Kaddish recitals (for mourners). Nusach Sefarad say Shir Shel Yom and Borchi Nafshi after half Hallel, and before Aleinu they add Ein K’Elokeinu with Kaddish DeRabbanan.

                        Mincha: In the Shemoneh Esreh we say Ya’aleh VeYavo, which we also add to Birkas Hamazon as well as mention of Rosh Chodesh in Beracha Acharona (Me’ein Shalosh) at all times. Kiddush Levana at first opportunity (we usually wait until Motza’ei Shabbos).

                        The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by many congregations and Yeshivos for our brothers and sisters in Eretz Yisrael: Chapter 83, 130, 142. –Y.K.

Rabbi Yaakov Klass

Parshas Noach

Wednesday, October 26th, 2011

Vol. LXII No. 43                                           5772

New York City

CANDLE LIGHTING TIME

October 28, 2011 – 30  Tishrei 5772

5:37 NYC E.D.T.

 

Sabbath Ends: 6:43 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

Weekly Reading: Noach

Weekly Haftara: Koh Amar Hashem (Isaiah 66:1-24)

Daf Yomi: Chullin 124

Mishna Yomit: Pesachim 9:4-5

Halacha Yomit: Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 181: 1-5

Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Metam’ei Mishkav u’Moshav  chap. 1-3

Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin 6:27 a.m. NYC E.D.T.

Latest Kerias Shema: 10:01 a.m. NYC E.D.T.

 

Today is Rosh Chodesh Cheshvan (Rosh Chodesh is 2 days, Friday and Shabbos). Friday morning: Shacharis with inclusion of Ya’aleh VeYavo in the Shemoneh Esreh. Following chazzan’s repetition we say half-Hallel, Kaddish Tiskabbel. We take out one Sefer Torah from the Ark. We read in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:1-15), we call four Aliyos (Kohen, Levi, Yisrael, Yisrael), the Baal Keriah recites half-Kaddish. We return the Torah to the Ark, Ashrei, U’va LeTziyyon – we delete Lamenatze’ach – the chazzan recites half-Kaddish; all then remove their tefillin.

Mussaf of Rosh Chodesh, followed by chazzan’s repetition and Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, Shir Shel Yom, Borchi Nafshi and their respective Kaddish recitals (for mourners). Nusach Sefarad say Shir Shel Yom and Borchi Nafshi after half-Hallel. Before Aleinu they add Ein K’Elokeinu with Kaddish DeRabbanan.

Mincha: In the Shemoneh Esreh we say Ya’aleh VeYavo, followed by chazzan’s repetition and Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu and Mourner’s Kaddish.

Birkas Hamazon: In the Grace after Meals we add Ya’aleh VeYavo as well as mention of Rosh Chodesh in Beracha Acharona (Me’ein Shalosh) at all times.

Friday evening, Kabbalas Shabbos and the usual Maariv tefilla with inclusion of Ya’aleh VeYavo in the Shemoneh Esreh. If one forgot to say Ya’aleh VeYavo – at Maariv only one does not repeat. (The Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 422:1, based on Berachos 30b, explains this as due to the fact that we do not sanctify the new month at night – and this rule applies even when Rosh Chodesh is two days.)

Shabbos mornings: Shacharis is usual Shabbos tefilla with inclusion of Ya’aleh VeYavo in the Shemoneh Esreh as well as in the chazzan’s repetition, followed by half-Hallel, Kaddish Tiskabbel. We remove two Torah scrolls from the Ark and in the first we read the weekly portion of Noach and call seven Aliyos. We then call the Maftir and read from the second Sefer Torah in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:9-15). We then read the Haftara, Hashamayim Kis’i (Yeshayahu 66:1-24). We say Yekum Purkan, we do not say Av HaRachamim, nor is there Hazkaras Neshamos, but we continue with Ashrei. We return the scrolls to the Ark and the chazzan says half-Kaddish.

Mussaf: Instead of Tikkanta Shabbos we substitute Ata Yatzarta and in the Korbanos (sacrifices) we mention both Shabbos and Rosh Chodesh; after chazzan’s repetition, Kaddish Tiskabbel followed by Ein K’Elokeinu, Aleinu, Shir Shel Yom and Borchi Nafshi and their respective Kaddish recitals (for mourners). Nusach Sefarad say Shir Shel Yom and Borchi Nafshi after Shacharis.

Mincha is usual Shabbos tefilla. We include Ya’aleh VeYavo in the Shemoneh Esreh. We do not say Tzidkas’cha. Maariv is the usual Motza’ei Shabbos tefilla.

                        The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by may congregations and Yeshivos for our brothers and sisters in Eretz Yisrael: Chapter 83, 130, 142. – Y.K.

Rabbi Yaakov Klass

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/weekly-luach/parshas-noach/2011/10/26/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: