web analytics
August 21, 2014 / 25 Av, 5774
Israel at War: Operation Protective Edge
 
 
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Schindler List’

Schindler’s List Goes Unsold on eBay

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013

An original list of names of 801 Jews rescued by German industrialist Oskar Schindler did not find a buyer on eBay, where the opening bid was set to be at least $3 million for the 14-page list typed on onion skin paper.

California collectors Gary Zimet and Eric Gazin had said when the auction was announced earlier this month that they expected the list to sell for about $5 million.

Though the list had no bids, more than half a million people viewed the auction on eBay. The sellers have said they will not re-list the document for auction at a lower price.

Gazin told the French news agency AFP that the sellers are in “active discussions” with several parties interested in acquiring the list.

Schindler was a German businessman credited with saving more than 1,000 Jews from the Nazis by deeming them essential workers for his enamel works factories.

His story reached worldwide attention after the release of the 1993 feature film “Schindler’s List.” Directed by Steven Spielberg, the movie won the Academy Award for Best Picture. It was based on the Booker Prize-winning novel “Schindler’s Ark,” which Australian novelist Thomas Keneally published in 1982.

Of the seven original versions of the list, only four are known to exist — including two at Yad Vashem, the Israeli Holocaust Memorial Museum, and one at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington.

Original Schindler’s List to be Sold on eBay for $3 million

Sunday, July 21st, 2013

A list of names of 801 Jews rescued by German industrialist Oskar Schindler went on the auction block on eBay, with a starting price of $3 million.

The 14 pages containing the original Schindler’s List were auctioned off by California collectors Gary Zimet and Eric Gazin, who are hoping to sell it for $5 million. So far, there are no takers, and bidders have until July 28 to stake their claim.

The date April 18, 1945 is written in pencil on the first page. Only male names appear on the German-language list, as well as each person’s date of birth and profession.

The list was named for Oskar Schindler, a German businessman credited with saving more than 1,000 Jews from the Nazis by deeming them essential workers for his enamel works factories.

His story reached worldwide attention after the release of the 1993 feature film “Schindler’s List.” Directed by Steven Spielberg, the movie was based on the Booker Prize-winning novel “Schindler’s Ark,” which Australian novelist Thomas Keneally published in 1982.

Of the seven original versions of the list, only four are known to still exist — including two at Yad Vashem, the Israeli Holocaust Memorial Museum, and one at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington.

The sellers said the copy being offered for sale on eBay is located in Israel, according to the paper.

“It is extremely rare that a document of this historical significance is put on the market,” Zimet said. “Many of the survivors on this list and their descendants moved to the United States, and there are names on this list which will sound very familiar to New Yorkers.”

The JTA contributed to this article.

A Hate-Filled Voice Silenced

Wednesday, October 6th, 2010
Joseph Sobran died last week. Regular readers may recall the Monitor devoting a handful of columns over the years to Sobran’s malicious commentary on Jews and Israel. He was a supremely talented writer with a prose style smooth as silk, but sometime in the mid-1980′s he descended deep into the fever swamps of anti-Semitism and never resurfaced.
Sobran was the kind of man who could complain that “Hitler died in 1945, but anti-Hitler hysteria is still going strong”; who cautioned against “the excessive moral prestige Jews have in the media and the public square”; who decried, in a column following the release of “Schindler’s List,” what he called “all this Holocaust-harping”; and who characterized Nazi genocide as basically an overreaction to the crimes of “Jewish-led communist movements.”
He was also someone who really believed that, as he once wrote, “History is replete with the lesson that a country in which the Jews get the upper hand is in danger. Such was the experience of Europe during Jewish-led Communist revolutions in Russia, Hungary, Romania and Germany.”
And he was a person whose deep-seated hostility to Israel caused him to harbor particular scorn for non-Jewish writers sympathetic to the Jewish state, as when he lamented that “Israel’s journalistic partisans include so many gentiles – lapsed goyim, you might say.”
Though Sobran’s work over the final decade and a half of his life was relegated mainly to the Internet, before that he had enjoyed a remarkably mainstream career as a syndicated columnist, a regular commentator, from 1979 to 1991, on the CBS radio network’s “Spectrum” series, and as a longtime senior editor at National Review.
Sobran’s increasingly negative focus on Jews and Israel led National Review’s late editor William F. Buckley to start distancing himself from Sobran before finally booting him from the magazine in 1990.
In 2002 Sobran wrote a rather lengthy letter to the Monitor responding to a column that had highlighted some of his more outrageous comments on Jews and Israel. It must be said that the tone of the letter was cordial throughout and even charming in terms of its candor, as when he owned up to the realization that he “may sound like an unpleasant sorehead” and confessed, “I wish I thought I had more to be grateful for.”
He also lamented, rather cryptically, that if he had a theme song it would probably be “I’ll Never Smile Again,” and added, disarmingly, “I don’t blame you or anyone else who finds me hard to put up with.”
Obviously this was not a very happy man.
While Sobran chose not to address the Monitor’s concerns about his feelings toward Jews in general, he showed no such reticence in discussing his attitude toward Israel.
“I can’t accept [Israel's] claims,” he wrote. “How could I? I’m a Catholic. I don’t think a U.S.-Israeli alliance is good for the U.S., and particularly for any Sobran boys who may wind up in another war. I’m not especially pro-Palestinian; in some ways I admire the Israelis; but mostly I want to stay OUT of their quarrel. As they say, I don’t have a dog in that fight; I just want to protect my own puppies.”
His argument sounded reasonable enough on its face – a concerned father worried for the welfare of his sons, fearful of losing them over a dispute far removed from his sphere of interest or concern.
Until, that is, one recalled all his comments about Jews being such a negative, even destructive, force and his flirtation with out and out Holocaust denial – he actually addressed the Holocaust revisionist Institute for Historical Review in 2002, asking the audience, “Why on earth is it ‘anti-Jewish’ to conclude from the evidence that the standard numbers of Jews murdered are inaccurate, or that the Hitler regime, bad as it was in many ways, was not, in fact, intent on racial extermination?”
And his claims that his feelings about Israel stemmed from his not wanting “any Sobran boys” to be caught up in Middle East wars rang hollow when one recalled that he had once written: “Israel exemplifies most of the ‘anti-Semitic stereotypes’ of yore: it is exclusivist, belligerent, parasitic, amoral and underhanded. It feels no obligation to non-Jews, even those who have befriended it.”

            No, this was not mere protective parental instinct. Something much, much darker was at work there.

 

Jason Maoz can be reached at jmaoz@jewishpress.com

Holocaust Survivor Meets Daughter Of Her Nazi Tormentor In New Documentary

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2008

Fear and trepidation were Helen Jonas’s every day companions while she served as a housemaid in the villa of Amon Goeth, the notorious Nazi commander of Plaszow concentration camp near Krakow, Poland. Six decades after those horrid years, Jonas received a letter from Monika Hertwig, Goeth’s daughter. She wanted to meet her.

“It wasn’t an easy task,” Jonas told The Jewish Press. “I hesitated a long time . But at the same time I thought of my dear parents and my family and friends and I thought this would be the time for me to talk for all the people who perished so tragically.”

After some soul-searching and encouragement from family and friends, Jonas boarded traveled a plane met Hertwig on the grounds of the former Plaszow concentration camp. Together they also visited Goeth’s villa, which still stands. Tears, frightening memories, and arguments passed between the two women.

This emotional meeting is the story of the new P.O.V.-produced documentary, “Inheritance,” which, this month, premieres nationwide on PBS (December 10th in New York; other locations may air it later).

James Moll, a co-founder of the Shoah Foundation and the director of “Inheritance,” told The Jewish Press that the film’s inception was unplanned. He had called up Hertwig several years ago to receive permission to use a photograph of her father for a short documentary he was producing for the 10th-anniversary “Schindler’s List” DVD.  While talking, Hertwig suddenly said to him, “I am not my father.”

“It took me by surprise,” Moll recalls. “So we started having this conversation about what her life was like growing up the daughter of this Nazi, this murderer.”

Hertwig, in fact, only first learned of her father’s war-time activities at age 11 when her mother yelled at her, “You are like your father and you will die like him.”  (Goeth was hanged by the Poles three times – he survived the first two attempts – shortly after the war while Hertwig was still a baby.)

 

Holocaust survivor Helen Jonas (left) meets Monika Hertwig, daughter of Nazi Commander Amon Goeth, at the Plaszow Concentration Camp memorial.(Photo credit: Don Holtz)

 

When she first watched “Schindler’s List” 15 years ago Hertwig hated Spielberg for exposing her to the truth. (Ralph Fiennes plays Goeth in the film.) Today, however, she finds herself publicly speaking of the Holocaust in Germany, having promised Jonas she would do so during their meeting.

Jonas and Hertwig are not friends. In response to the question, “Do you maintain contact with Hertwig?” Jonas first sounded shocked and then answered, “No, no sir, I can’t do that.”  At the same time, though, she doesn’t hold her father’s actions against her. “She didn’t do anything to me.” And yet she wavered when asked if she identified Hertwig with her father: “No, I don’t connect it I’m trying not to connect it, let’s put it that way.”

Talking of her years in Goeth’s villa, Jonas said that it was Oscar Schindler, the hero in “Schindler’s List” and a frequent guest at the villa, who saved her life, bringing her and her two sisters to his famous factory in Czechoslovakia after Goeth had been arrested for embezzlement. “He used to see how Goeth humiliated me,” Jonas recalls. “He saw how scared I was. Occasionally he’d come to the kitchen and pat my head and say, ‘Don’t worry, don’t worry, you’ll survive.’ But I was very confused because to me he was a German . But then he kept his promise and he came for me and my sisters.”

Six decades later Jonas is now publicly reliving those years. If she doesn’t, she says, “so much will be lost for the future generations and nobody will know about the Holocaust.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/interviews-and-profiles//2008/12/03/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: