web analytics
March 27, 2015 / 7 Nisan, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Sea of Galilee’

Snow on Thursday, Summer on Monday

Wednesday, February 18th, 2015

Snow will begin to fall on Thursday evening, and Israelis in Jerusalem and even on the hills of Carmel overlooking Haifa will see a winter wonderland Friday morning.

Up to a foot may fall on Jerusalem, Gush Etzion and Hebron.

The unusually late snowstorm will be accompanied by high winds and freezing temperatures that will bring snow to areas as low as 200 meters (1,000 feet), which includes Karnei-Ginot Shomron in Samaria, Nazareth, Upper Haifa, Modi’in and Arad and possibly even on Ben Gurion Airport and as far south as Be’er Sheva in the Negev Desert.

There is a chance that snow also will fall on Maaleh Adumim, a rarity. Rain and hail will fall on Tel Aviv.

Rain will fall Thursday morning and turn to snow by evening and continue through the night. Snow will be occasional on Friday and will resume at higher levels at night and Saturday morning before ending.

The storm will bring approximately 4 inches of precipitation to the Hermon and higher hills in northern Israel. Using the usual equation that one inch of rain equals 10 inches of snow, accumulations will reach three feet on the upper slopes of the Hermon.

At least 2 inches of rain is expected to fall on the Sea of Galilee (Kinneret), which along with run-off from mountain streams next week will raise the level of the lake significantly.

Even the Jordan Valley will be blessed with an unusually large amount of rain, possibly more than in inch, and half an inch will fall in the Arava, north of Eilat.

As usual, the snow will not stay on the ground for long. The thermometer will rise on Sunday and by Monday, it will be pleasant and warmer than usual, with lots of slush.

However, winter can’t be over because Purim is two weeks away. The holiday usually is wet.

 

 

 

 

Snow, Lightning and Floods in Northern Israel in Photos

Friday, February 13th, 2015

Heavy snow closed the Hermon ski slopes and roads in the Golan Heights Friday morning, while residents in the coastal city of Nahariya, near the Lebanese border, are coping with floods that have made some roads impassable.

More than five inches of rain fell in Nahariya in the past 24 hours, and Netanya, between Haifa and Tel Aviv, has joined the growing club of communities that have received their annual average yearly amount of precipitation.

The Kinneret added another inch but still is 12 feet away from the level at which a dam would have to be opened to prevent flooding, which has not happened since the fierce winter in 1991-1992.

Kinneret watchers are counting on this week’s storm to raise the level significantly once mountain streams flow into the lake.

The storm literally divided the country, with the south remaining dry but cold under partly cloudy skies while the north is drenched.

The storm will reach its peak today and weaken on Shabbat.

Occasional rain may linger around on Sunday and Monday, followed by warm temperatures.

Weather models show that another storm system, with snow, may make its way to Israel by next Shabbat.

Waves smack the Mediterranean Coast on the shores of northwest Israel.

Waves smack the Mediterranean Coast on the shores of northwest Israel.

 

Lightning in the winter.

Lightning in the winter.

Haredim brave high winds at Har Zeitim (Mount of Olives) cemetery in Jerusalem.

Haredim brave high winds at Har Zeitim (Mount of Olives) cemetery in Jerusalem. Photo: Flash 90

Unexpected Downpour Swells Lake Kinneret, Creates Havoc in Israel

Thursday, May 8th, 2014

The sun peeked out just long enough Thursday afternoon for Israelis to see the flooding caused by the “sound and light show” they endured over Wednesday night.

Cracks of thunder and long streaks of lightning interspersed with the downpour that sent sheets of rain down through the skies over Israel, drenching the entire country.

Downpours at this time of year are unusual but not unheard of, meteorologist said. By mid-afternoon Thursday, the skies in southern Israel were once again filled with leaden clouds that appeared once more to be pregnant with rain. It was not clear whether in fact more precipitation was on the way; the forecast calls for the possibility for rain, continuing even into as Friday morning.

Rain is considered a blessing in this part of the world no matter when it arrives. There has been a 2.5-centimeter (one inch) rise in the water level of Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee) as a result of the record-breaking downpour.

But some may have seen it as a mixed blessing: Fifteen members of the Bnei Akiva youth group were trapped in a southern Israeli parking lot due to the flooding. They were rescued by special teams and evacuated from the scene by helicopter. IDF vehicles prepared to enter the area to help evacuate remaining hikers who had been touring in the area.

Bezeq phone lines were still down around the Dead Sea area at midday and service was sporadic at best.

Cell phone companies were scrambling to restore service in the central region. In the Jerusalem area, Cellcom customers reported all kinds of difficulties in placing their calls and in sending text messages Thursday afternoon.

The company had not formulated a response to the complaints by mid-afternoon.

Further south, near Eilat, Route 90 was still closed to traffic by late afternoon due to flash flooding that swamped the road after a night of thunder and lightning that swept Israel from north to south. Route 31, which had been closed earlier in the day, is now open.

Another Deluge of Rain on the Way but No Snow Except on Hermon

Thursday, December 26th, 2013

The second storm of the young winter is headed for Israel with more needed rain but no snow, except on the Hermon mountain.

Forecasters predict that it will rain on Eilat, an event that usually occurs only two or three times a year, and that up to three inches of rain will fall in the north and central regions.

Flash floods are predicted in the Arava and Dead Sea areas, which may receive an unusually large quantity of rain, possibly an inch.

The rain will follow deceivingly warmer than usual weather on Friday and will begin falling with the temperature Saturday afternoon, with the full force of the storm coming on Sunday and early Monday before weakening. No rain is forecast next week after Tuesday and temperatures will rise.

The Kinneret (Sea of Galilee) now lacks 2.49 meters (slightly more than 8 feet) before reaching the level where the Degania dam must be opened to prevent flooding in the beachside city of Tiberias. Opening the dam also will bring much needed water to the Dead Sea via the Jordan River.

There has  been no need to open the dam for 21 years.

Precipitation in Jerusalem 50% of Annual Amount

Sunday, December 15th, 2013

Torrential rains and the “snowstorm of the century” last week have left Jerusalem with 51 percent of its annual amount of precipitation, according to observations by the Israeli Meteorological Service, and the winter has barely begun.

Be’er Sheva, where many areas still are flooded, now has accumulated 63 percent of is annual rainfall and more than double the amount for this time of year.

Rainfall so this year in metropolitan Tel Aviv is 44-50 percent of its annual average, and Tiberias, which borders the Kinneret (Sea of Galilee), has received 131 percent of the usual rainfall for this time of year and one-third of its annual average.

Most of Israel’s precipitation usually falls from late December to early March. No more rain is in sight until early next week.

Wicked Storm from Russia ‘Attacks’ Israel with Rain and Snow

Tuesday, December 10th, 2013

A wicked and rare early winter storm plowed into Israel Wednesday, and weather forecasters predict between four and eight inches of rain will fall in the north, with gale force winds and possibly snow in Jerusalem and the higher hills of Judea and Samaria.

Snow is rare in Israel in early December, and predicting the white stuff in the country is as tricky as forecasting anything else in the Middle East. A tiny shift in the winds often moves a weather system towards or away from land, and a change of one or two degrees in the temperature can spell the difference between rain and snow.

This week’s system is a woozy, and the only questions are whether the rains will be drenching or extremely torrential, and if snow will accumulate in Jerusalem.

Rain fell in central and northern Israel last week after a dry November, and some communities in the western Negev received as much as four inches of rain. The Kinneret began to rise for the first time since last spring, but that is only a sneak preview of what is in store for the country from today through Sunday.

Before it is all over, more than three feet of snow is expected to have fallen on the upper slopes of the Hermon, which would allow for a very early opening of the ski season next week, weather permitting.

The Ministry of Agriculture predicts that up to seven inches of rain will fall in the northern Golan Heights, six inches in the Haifa area, 2-3 inches on the Kinneret, 5-6 inches around metropolitan Tel Aviv, 2-3 inches in the northern Negev and more than half an inch in the parched Arava desert.

The storm is rare in its expected intensity and length because it is headed from Russia, via the Black Sea, an unusual occurrence in early December. Meteorologist Tzachi Waxman of Meteo-Tech said, “A cold wave like this is exceptional for this time of year and usually occurs in January and February.”

Torrential rains will raise the level of the Kinneret dramatically once run-off begins from mountain streams.

The downside of the storm will be the usual flooded streets, traffic jams and power outages resulting from electric poles and wires downed by heavy winds and from heavy demand for power by everyone using electric heaters to stay warm.

Air traffic at Ben Gurion may be disrupted, which could knock out the schedule of U.S. Secretary John Kerry who is to land in Israel on Wednesday. With a bit of luck, good or bad depending on your view, he might not be able to land at all.

Heavy rains and strong winds, which may reach gale force velocity, began falling in the northern Negev late Tuesday. Weather maps indicate a rare phenomenon for this time of year will occur on Wednesday, when rain is expected to fall over the entire country, from the northern border to Eilat.

Snow on Wednesday night will cover Tzfat (Safed) and other higher elevations in the northern Galilee and the Golan Heights, and it will continue on Thursday, with occasional thunderstorms throughout the country.

There is a chance of snow in Jerusalem and the mountains in Judea and Samaria and the Negev on Thursday and a higher probability that snow will fall on those areas Thursday night and Friday. However, there is no assurance that the snow will accumulate below altitudes of 2,800 feet, the height of most of the highest areas in Jerusalem. Parts of Gush Etzion and the southern Hevron Hills are as high as 3,000 feet, where accumulation is more probable.

Flash floods will smash through the Judean Desert and Arava.

Private weather forecasters predict that the storm will continue to pummel Israel on the Sabbath before weakening late in the day. It will be extremely cold Saturday night, with possible sub-zero temperatures in higher elevations.

Official Winter Forecast Indicates Kinneret May Reach Flood Level

Monday, October 28th, 2013

Israel will enjoy average rainfall this winter, according to the Israel Meteorological Service, and there is a good chance that the dam  at the Kinneret (Sea of Galilee) will have to be opened up before summer because of the increasing use of desalinated water from the Mediterranean Sea.

The Meteorological Service said its annual winter forecast has a margin of error of up to 25 percent but generally does not miss the mark more than 10 percent in either direction.

The sea has replaced the Kinneret as Israel’s largest source of water, not including the underground aquifer system that is being replenished thanks to the use of more desalinated water.

The Kinneret rose approximately 2.5 meters (8 feet) last winter, which brought average or slightly more than average rainfall in most regions.

As of Monday morning, the Kinneret was exactly 2.5 meters below the level at which the dams would have to be opened to prevent flooding in the beachside city of Tiberias and neighboring farms and tourist parks. If the forecast turns out to be accurate, the Kinneret will rise to near flood level this year.

Opening the dams would dump more water into the Jordan River, which feeds the Dead Sea that is in desperate need of more water.

In Israel, the prayer that cites God as the “rainmaker” began on Shemini Azereth-Simchat Torah, the day after Sukkot. The actually request for rain began two weeks ago, on the seventh day of the Hebrew month of Cheshvan in Israel. The prayer is not said until December 4 outside of Israel.

If rain does not fall within 30 days of the request, special prayers and fast days are held. From a climactic standpoint, Israel received its first rains a month ago during the Sukkot holiday, when a measurable amount of rain, although only 1 millimeter, was recorded in most of the country.

Most of the rain and snow in Israel usually falls in the months of December, January and February.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/official-winter-forecast-indicates-kinneret-may-reach-flood-level/2013/10/28/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: