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January 24, 2017 / 26 Tevet, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Sea of Galilee’

‘Winter Wonderland’ Whitens Northern Israel, Brings Rain Elsewhere

Tuesday, December 27th, 2016

A winter storm on Tuesday brought snow to to the Golan Heights and Mount Hermon, a veritable boon for the skiers and eventually, a rush of water into Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee) when the white stuff eventually melts.

The storm also brought rain to Jerusalem and to the rest of the northern and central regions, and where the coastal highway was closed for hours due to flooding.

Walking in the rain in downtown Jerusalem.

Walking in the rain in downtown Jerusalem.

Sadly, part of a 3,000-year-old wall at the Tel Dan archaeological site in the north, which has survived since the time of the First Holy Temple, collapsed on Tuesday due to the downpour.

Throughout the day it was unseasonably cold, and temperatures continued to drop even into the southern region, towards the northern Negev desert. Scattered showers and thunderstorms were in the forecast in the Negev as well, but expected to fade out in the evening.

Flash flood warnings were in effect along the coast and in the Judean desert, where tourists and hikers are often caught unawares. The warnings are also in effect for the northern Negev desert and along the Dead Sea area, where hikers and unwary drivers may suddenly encounter flooding on the road along the Dead Sea coast.

Hana Levi Julian

Minor Earthquake Near the Kineret

Friday, December 2nd, 2016

A minor earthquake, registering 3.8 on the Richter scale struck northern Israel at 6:35 AM. The epicenter was just 5 kilometers north of the Sea of Galilee and the city of Teveria (Tiberias).

No damage or injuries were reported.

On Tuesday, there was a minor earthquake in the Sinai, and last week there was a minor quake in Lebanon.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Israel Weighing Moving Desalinated Water to Drought-Plagued Kinneret

Wednesday, November 30th, 2016

Israel’s Water Authority is looking into establishing a system to move desalinated water from central Israel to lake Kinneret, in the opposite direction of the historic National Water Carrier of Israel, which has been delivering Kinneret water to the Negev since 1964. Over the past three years, due to partial droughts and natural evaporation, the Kinneret’s rate of replenishment has been reduced substantially.

An additional burden on the receding lake is the uninterrupted consumption by Jordan. In accordance with the 1994 peace treaty with the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, the latter will be drawing 11.2 billion gallons of water from the Kinneret – while Israel in 2016 will be drawing only about 6.6 billion gallons.

So the Kinneret continues to recede and the Water Authority realizes something’s gotta’ give. The plan, according to a report in Ha’aretz Wednesday, is to push 27 billion gallons annually into the lake from desalination plants in central Israel, raising the Kinneret water level by about 28 inches each year.

Incidentally, the total annual capacity of central Israel’s desalination plants is 150 billion gallons, making Israel the runaway king of water reclamation on planet Earth. By 2015, Israel’s desalination programs provided roughly 40% of Israel’s drinking water and it is expected to supply 70% by 2050.

The plan was presented at Tuesday’s inaugural meeting of the Water Public Forum at Tel Aviv University, which included past and present Water Authority senior officials, scientists, engineers, managers of northern water societies, and representatives of environmental groups.

Meanwhile, according to Ha’aretz, Israeli farmers upriver from the Kinneret, who had been refused an increase of 11 billion gallons annually, have begun to draw water from the Jordan River at night – endangering the environment which is already on a brink of an ecological crisis – this while Jordan continues to siphon exactly this amount for its own agriculture.

JNi.Media

Island Reappears in Drying Lake Kinneret While Jordan Keeps Siphoning

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016

Aerial photographs shot by a drone operated by Rahaf, a company specializing in photography and documentation projects from the air, show the dreaded “Kinneret Island,” which appears in Israel’s northern lake whenever the dry season claims significant portions of the lake’s water.

According to Pinhas Green, Deputy CEO of the Kinneret Authority, “since the beginning of summer the Kinneret level has gone down by 40 inches, placing it at 14.76 inches below the lowest red line. The level is very low. The drought arrived early this year. … We should all pray for an exceptionally rainy winter.”

To be full, the Kinneret is currently missing 180 inches (38 ft.).

Israel transports water from Lake Kinneret, or the Sea of Galilee, to the population centers of Israel, as well as to Jordan. The lake supplies only about 10% of Israel’s drinking water needs, but under the terms of the Israel–Jordan peace treaty, Israel also supplies 50,000,000 cubic meters (1,765,733,336 cubic feet) of water annually from the lake to Jordan. In recent years the Israeli government has made extensive investments in water reclamation and desalination infrastructure in the country. This has allowed it to significantly reduce the amount of water pumped from the lake annually in an effort to restore and improve its ecological environment, as well as respond to some of the most extreme drought conditions in hundreds of years which the lake’s intake basin has frequently experienced since 1998.

It is expected that in 2016 only about 25,000,000 cubic meters (880,000,000 cubic feet) of water will be drawn from the lake for Israeli domestic consumption.

Jordan, on the other hand (the folks who gave you the Islamic Waqf on Temple Mount), which hasn’t made an investment in water preservation, will continue to receive more than a billion and a half cubic feet of water every year.

JNi.Media

Barnacled Bombs Discovered Along Lake Kinneret

Monday, August 15th, 2016

Five unexploded mortar shells left over from a past war were found Monday on a beach along Lake Kinneret, also known as the Sea of Galilee, near Kibbutz Ma’agen.

Police officers and sappers from the Israel Police bomb squad were dispatched to the site.

Searching along the beaches of Lake Kinneret for unexploded ordnance.

Searching along the beaches of Lake Kinneret for unexploded ordnance.

Security personnel immediately closed off the area and began a search to determine whether any other unexploded ordnance remained in the area.

At least four other shells were found.

Israel Police and IDF military personnel worked together to defuse the unexploded shells.

Hana Levi Julian

Lake Kinneret Rising Due to Sabbath Rain

Sunday, February 7th, 2016

Israel’s Water Authority announced Sunday that due to the rain this weekend some 60 mm of water was gathered in cisterns in the northern region and a total of 30 mm of water fell in the center of the country.

Since the Sabbath, the water level in Lake Kineret, also known as the Sea of Galilee, rose another two centimeters, nearly one inch.

The Kinneret is Israel’s largest reservoir of drinking water.

The level of the lake now stands at -212.77 cm, which is 23 cm above the lower red line — the mark which is considered dangerously low.

The Kinneret lacks only 3.97 meters more until it is filled to capacity — and rain is predicted for parts of Israel on Sunday.

Hana Levi Julian

Water Level Rising in Lake Kinneret

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

The water level in Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee) rose again last night by three centimeters (a bit over one inch) after heavy rain Tuesday.

Israel’s Water Authority reported the lake now stands at 212.85 meters below sea level.

The level is four meters below the lake’s optimal capacity.

Lake Kinneret is the main source of drinking water for the population in the State of Israel.

Hana Levi Julian

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/water-level-rising-in-lake-kinneret/2016/01/20/

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