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December 10, 2016 / 10 Kislev, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Second Lebanon War’

If Hizbullah is the ‘Party of God,’ Who is Nasrallah Worshipping?

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

Hizbullah has carried out wars and terrorist attacks against Israel and Jews for 21 years, but Lebanon’s nationalist party charged this week he is turning his “resistance” on them instead of Israel.

The Hizbullah terrorist organization has grown into a full-fledged political party and army that increasingly dominate Lebanon. The United States and Britain have defined it as an organization, but the European Union still has held out, despite Bulgaria’s declaration last week that Hizbullah was directly behind last year’s attack on a bus of Israelis in the country.

The IDF’s blog this week summarized 21 years of activities of the “resistance” Party of God”:

—  A mere three weeks after he became the organization’s leader, Nasrallah had already orchestrated a major terror attack against the Israeli embassy in Buenos Aires, killing 29 civilians.

—  Two years later, Nasrallah ordered another terror attack in the Argentinean capital – this time against the Jewish Center of Buenos Aires, murdering 85 men and women and wounding more than 300 others. During the same period, Hizbullah terrorists fired hundreds of rockets at towns in northern Israel.

— In 2000, after then-Prime Minister Ehud ordered a sudden withdrawal of Israeli solders from the southern Lebanon security zone, Nasrallah readily filled the power vacuum and carefully prepared for the offensive on Israel in 2006 by carrying out groundwork – and work underground. Nasrallah built a network of underground bunkers, camouflaged by vegetation and trees that covered up communications equipment and missiles.

He also placed thousands of rockets in villages before Hizbullah carried out the kidnap-murder of two Israel reservists, Ehud Goldwasser and Eldad Regev, in late June 2006, setting the stage for the 34-day Second Lebanon War. Israel’s casualty toll was 119 soldiers, 43 civilians and hundreds of northern Israel residents.

— Since the 2006 ceasefire that was supposed to disarm Hizbullah, it has stockpiled more than three times the 20,000 missiles it possessed before the war. The IDF stated that Hizbullah now has “the largest weapons arsenal of any terror organization in the world today.”

—  In July 2012, a Hizbullah  suicide bomber boarded a tourist bus in Burgas, Bulgaria and killed five Israelis who were in Bulgaria on vacation, as well as their Bulgarian bus driver.

So much for “resistance.”

But Lebanon’s Future Movement is worried the “resistance” is targeting them as Nasrallah tries to solidify his political position in Lebanon and take advantage of the Syrian civil war to be the kingpin in the axis of terror headed by Hizbullah’s ally Iran.

In a speech last Saturday, Nasrallah uttered one of the most chutzpah remarks possible, stating that the former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri said a few months before his assassination by Syrian operatives that he supported Hizbullah’s maintaining its arsenal, even if there would be an overall Israeli-Arab peace settlement.

The Future Movement accused Nasrallah of attempting to twist the facts for saying that the slain leader, unlike his son, Sa’ad, supported Hizbullah’s arsenal, according to the Beirut Daily Star.

“What is most important [in Nasrallah’s speech] is that he frankly confessed that his resistance against the Israeli enemy has turned into a resistance against the Future Movement, as if the Future Movement has become the enemy,” the Future Movement stated.

“[Hizbullah’s arms] are a major bone of contention among the Lebanese,” it said, adding that “Lebanon is suffering [from] the predicament of the illegitimate arms which Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah insists on retaining as a tool to blackmail the Lebanese and the state and control its institutions.”

For his part, Nasrallah didn’t miss the opportunity in his speech to say he has not forgotten Israel.

“I warn Israel and those behind it that the resistance in Lebanon will not remain silent to any aggression against Lebanon,” he said. “I would like to remind them that only a few rockets are needed to [target] their airports, ports and power plants.”

Tzvi Ben-Gedalyahu

From Fighter Pilot to Gold Medalist

Sunday, September 9th, 2012

Noam Greshuny’s story is one of triumph of the spirit.

Six years after being critically wounded during the Second Lebanon War, Gershuny won a gold medal at the Paralympics Games in London playing tennis, beating the number-one ranking player, American David Wagner 6:3, 6:1.

During the second week of the Second Lebanon War, on July 20th, two Apache helicopters on their way to an operation in Lebanon collided over Israel’s northern border. One pilot, Major Ran kochbah was killed immediately. The second pilot, Gershuny, was critically wounded. He spent months in rehabilitation, during which he discovered his love for tennis.

Six years later he made it to the top, bringing Israel its first gold medal from the London Paralympics Games and the first ever in tennis. His family and friends were at the game to support him.

When Greshuny ascended the podium to receive the medal and heard Israel’s national anthem HaTikvah playing in the background he was overcome by his emotions, shedding a tear.

Afterwards, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called the 29-year-old athlete to congratulate him, telling him “you symbolize the victory of the human spirit over the difficulties created by the reality in which we live.”

President Shimon Peres contacted Gershuny as well, saying, “You have proved that you are good on the court as well as you are in the sky.”

When Gershuny was interviewed by IDF radio he said, “I don’t know if it had an affect on me, the fact that I was wounded for the country, giving my life and body for her. I would do it all over again, even if I knew that this would be the outcome. This may have made me happier, the fact that I am able to bring so much pride to the country.”

Aryeh Savir, Tazpit News Agency

Nasrallah: We Will Strike Tel Aviv

Sunday, May 13th, 2012

In a televised speech in suburbs south of Beirut on Friday, Hizbullah leader Seyyed Hassan Nasrallah boasted that his sophisticated terror network is capable of hitting any target “in Tel Aviv and occupied Palestine”.

Nasrallah spoke at an event commemorating the completion of reconstruction and rebuilding of destruction incurred during the Second Lebanon War.  The Second Lebanon War began on July 12, 2006, when Hizbullah fired rockets into northern Israel at the same time as it attacked two Israeli military jeeps, killing 3 IDF soldiers.

According to a report in the Tehran Times, Nasrallah told attendees that “the era in which we are afraid and they are not is over,” and that his group is “capable of striking very specific targets not only in Tel Aviv but everywhere in occupied Palestine.”

He bragged that while Israel attempted to “crush the resistance” during the month-long Second Lebanon War, “the war has failed to achieve its goal”.  And in the future, he said, “for every building destroyed in Dahiya [an area in the suburbs of southern Beirut], a building will be destroyed in Tel Aviv”.

As of 2010, the Israeli government estimated that Hizbullah had an arsenal of more than 15,000 long-range rockets on its border with Lebanon.

Malkah Fleisher

Outpouring Support for Officer who Hit Danish Provocateur, Even as Damning Report Is Anticipated

Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

The IDF investigation of the beating of a Danish agent provocateur Andreas Ayas of the International Solidarity Movement (ISM) by Deputy Bik’ah Brigade Commander Lt. Col. Shalom Eisner, will be presented Tuesday the the IDF Chief of Staff, and it appears that the report will recommend to remove Lt. Col. Eisner from office, but keep him in the army.

However, the legal proceedings against Eisner will continue, and may affect his future career. The investigation was headed by Central Command Chief, Gen. Nitzan Alon.

On Tuesday, Denmark has demanded clarification from Israel about the incident and the investigation. The Foreign Office updated the Danish Ambassador in Israel about the steps taken since the exposure of the video online. President Shimon Peres attempted to minimize the damage when he said that “The IDF responded clearly, and we must await its conclusions. It’s an isolated incident that should be investigated, and we should avoid far-reaching conclusions.”

Beyond the moral aspects, the investigation also dealt with the operational conduct of the forces in the field during the event. In this respect, the report found failures, primarily in inadequate preliminary preparations for the event; the force that was sent into the area was too small and did not receive police support as required.

On Monday, 83 reserves officers and soldiers sent the Defense Minister and the IDF Chief of Staff a letter supporting the Eisner, who had been suspended from his post.

Hagit Rein, grieving mother of the late Major B’naya Rein who was killed in the Second Lebanon War and whose body was recovered by Eisner under fire, called the Army Radio to express her dismay at the way Eisner was being judged by the “media court.”

During that war, B’naya Rein assembled a special force to assist damaged tanks. He was killed on that mission for which he had volunteered, and his body remained in enemy territory. At the command level it was decided that rescuing the body was too dangerous, according to the reservists’ letter. Then it was decided they lacked the necessary resources for a rescue mission.

After three days, Shalom Eisner, who was then commander of an armored battalion, heard about the abandoned body and said it was unacceptable that the body of an army officer would be lying on the ground while his parents were waiting for him at home. Eisner took a jeep, recall his fellow officers and soldiers, put on a flak jacket and went out to get B’naya. “Surrounded by burned-out tanks, missiles flying in every direction, he just went out into the field, loaded the body and brought it back.”

Lt. Col. Eisner’s supporters expressed their complete faith in him “as a man, as a friend and as a moral commander.”

Abir Sultan/Flash 90

Yori Yanover

Plagued by Charges of Ineptness and Corruption, Olmert to Keynote at J Street Conference

Friday, March 2nd, 2012

JTA reports that Ehud Olmert, the former Israeli prime minister who was a key figure in the removal of close to 10,000 Jews from their homes in Gaza, and then blundered the Second Lebanon War, is scheduled to be the keynote speaker at the annual J Street conference.

Olmert will speak at the pro-Palestinian state group’s gala dinner on March 26, according to an invitation sent Thursday morning to members of the US Congress. JTA obtained an invitation, and a J Street official confirmed its authenticity.

As of early Friday morning, the J Street website has made no mention of Olmert’s participation in the event, to be held in the Washington DC Convention Center from March 24-27 .

Olmert, who was forced to step down as prime minister in 2008 to face criminal investigations, is still facing corruption trials in Israeli court. But corrupt or not, J Street has found the one Israeli ‘right-wing’ politician (Olmert started his political career in the Likud Party) with whom it has a true understanding.

Although J Street describes itself as a pro-Israel organization that supports peace between Israel and its neighbors, many Israelis and US Jews, including many public figures, have said that J Street is anti-Israel, particularly in relation to the security challenges facing the Jewish state. Several US Jewish leaders have objected to J Street’s position on Israel, and have publicly disassociated themselves from the organization.

J Street has had tense relations with Olmert’s replacement, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, whose government has sought to marginalize the group for failing to support Israel’s efforts to push back against investigations of Israel’s conduct in the 2009 Gaza war, and for equivocating on Iran sanctions until late 2009.

Following Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s stroke in 2006, Olmert became prime minister and led their Kadima party to a decisive victory in elections that year. He then led negotiations with Mahmoud Abbas, the president of the Palestinian Authority, and now says he was prepared to make the most far-reaching compromises with the Palestinian leader in 2008, only to be turned down.

Palestinian officials say Olmert by that time was too damaged by corruption scandals for the offer to be credible.

As a member of Sharon’s government, Olmert participated in forging Israel’s unilateral disengagement plan to evict all Israelis  from the Gaza Strip and four settlements in the Samaria. Israeli citizens who refused to accept government compensation packages and voluntarily vacate their homes prior to the August 15, 2005 deadline were evicted by Israeli security forces over a period of several days. The eviction of all residents, demolition of the residential buildings, and evacuation of associated security personnel from the Gaza Strip was completed by September 12, 2005. The eviction and dismantling of the four settlements in Samaria was completed ten days later.

Jacob Edelist

Rocket Shot at Israel Lands in Lebanon

Monday, December 12th, 2011

An Arab woman was wounded in southern Lebanon on Sunday when a Katyusha rocket aimed at Israel landed short of its mark.

 

The rocket was fired from the area of Bint Jbeil, a town a mile from Israel and the site of a major battle of the 2006 Second Lebanon War, and landed on an apartment building in the Lebanese border village of Hula.  Hizbullah denies connection to the attack.

 

Two weeks ago, rockets were fired from Lebanon to Israel, the first time since 2009.  The rockets, which landed in the western Galilee, caused property damage but no injuries.  An Al-Qaida-affiliated terror group called the Abdullah Azzam Brigades initially issued a statement taking responsibility for those attacks on “the settlements of the Zionist enemy in northern Palestine,” but later retracted.

 

The United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) has been deployed in Lebanon since 1978 to serve as an observing and peacekeeping force.  Its almost 14,000 troops are charged with preventing violence and terrorism in the region.

Malkah Fleisher

Lebanon: Crossing And Possessing

Monday, November 14th, 2011

About 15 months after the Second Lebanon War, we were called up to reserve duty in the Gush Talmonim region, part of the Binyamin Regional Council. On the second Friday night, I enjoyed the privilege of leading the entire company in singing, “Shalom Aleichem.” Although there wasn’t even a minyan of shomrei Shabbat men, the soldiers pulled out their hats in honor of the song (a handful placed a hand on their heads), and all respectfully rose to their feet – including the Bedouin trackers.

After the meal one of the soldiers approached me, and in a rare moment of sentimentality (an unusual occurrence on the macho Israeli landscape), he told me that the Kiddush was very nice and that it reminded him of the Kiddush that I recited back in Lebanon.

That Shabbat Nachamu of 2006 in the village of Shamah is an experience that I’m not likely to forget.

On the previous Wednesday, we entered Israel’s northern neighbor’s territory. Our visit was extended and within 30 hours, we had used up all of our food and water. Early Friday morning, we arrived in Shamah – tired, hungry, and dazed. We scattered among the local houses, where our hosts did not exactly see to our comfort. In fact, they weren’t even home.

Some of the others fared better, but my platoon’s Lebanese “hosts” were either desperately poor or had managed to take all their food with them before escaping the Zionist enemy. I thus avoided the following dilemma faced by others: were they forbidden/permitted/required to eat the non-kosher food that they had found?

Fortunately vegetable gardens are hard to move, and we were able to help ourselves to some watermelons and tomatoes. I was even happier that HaKadosh Baruch Hu planted the brilliant idea in my head of picking grapes from a vine-covered pergola. The grapes were crushed (by hand) in a plastic bag, and the juice dripped straight out of a hole into an empty bottle.

In the pitch darkness, we sat on sofas in the living room singing “L’cha Dodi” with feeling. Every few seconds someone would destroy the mood with a long “shh,” which would bring us back down to earth and remind us that we were in enemy territory and should be conducting ourselves accordingly. But in our enthusiasm, the decibels would soon rise again – and the process would repeat itself.

After somehow managing to daven by heart, the fresh grape juice was poured into a glass from the kitchen, and then I made Kiddush for everyone. Someone shared the pistachios that he managed to “smuggle,” and so we even had Kiddush b’makom seudah. (Ideally, Kiddush should lead into a meal.)

The next morning, we discovered that the grape juice had begun to ferment. Meanwhile we had no food left, and our shrunken stomachs had to make do with “spiritual food.” One of the guys took out a small Chumash, and we spent the next three hours going over Parshat Va’etchanan, theparshat hashavua. Astonishingly, the parshah seemed to have been written just for us.

Moshe said, “Let me now cross over and see the good land this good mountain and the Lebanon And Hashem commanded me at that time to teach you statutes and ordinances so that you should do them in the land to whichyoucross there[Shamah] to possess And from there you will seek Hashem, your God, and you will find Him; if you search for Him with all your heart and with all your soul to drive out nations from before you; to bring you, to give you their land for an inheritance, as this very day” (Deut. 3:25-4:38).

We had just conquered Shamah – and there we were, sitting and seeking Hashem!

“Face to face, Hashem spoke with you at the mountain from amid the fire” (Deut. 5:4).

We certainly had seen plenty of fire and mountains, but what did Hashem say to us “face to face”?

The first three chapters of the parshah contain all sorts of relevant hints, but the next chapter, chapter 6, was even more eerily reminiscent of our current circumstances.

According to some opinions (Gittin 7b), the northern borders of Eretz Yisrael reach the location of the village of Kfar Ras El Baide – where we were to spend the next Shabbat (our second and final one). This is referred to today as Lebanon (in spite of the anarchy that prevails in its south). During biblical times, this area belonged to the tribe of Asher.

Eldad Zamir

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/jewish-columns/lessons-in-emunah/lebanon-crossing-and-possessing/2011/11/14/

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