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September 30, 2014 / 6 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘security forces’

IDF Troops Ignore Supreme Court, Demolish Jewish Homes in Gush Etzion

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

IDF commanders dispatched with legal niceties Wednesday and ordered the demolition of seven homes and a kindergarten in the Jewish community of Ma’aleh Rehava’am without waiting for the Supreme Court to rule on the matter.

An IDF legal adviser to the Civil Administration of Judea and Samaria informed Etzion Brigade Colonel Amit Yamin at midday he need not wait to confirm a Supreme Court restraining order against the demolitions in Gush Etzion.  Once Yamin gave the order, security forces moved fast and finished the demolitions before the Court had issued a restraining order.

Copy of Supreme Court restraining order against demolitions at Ma'aleh Rehavam in Gush Etzion. It says: "Do not carry out any actions that create irreversible consequences ."

Copy of Supreme Court restraining order against demolitions at Ma’aleh Rehavam in Gush Etzion. It says: “Do not carry out any actions that create irreversible consequences .”

An officer receives a call while waiting on site at Ma'aleh Rehavam prior to destroying homes and a kindergarten on Wednesday, May 14, 2014.

An officer receives a call while waiting on site at Ma’aleh Rehavam prior to destroying homes and a kindergarten on Wednesday, May 14, 2014.

Early Wednesday, David Perl, head of the Gush Etzion Residents’ Council said that the Court had ordered a stay against the demolitions early in the morning after residents had submitted evidence of having purchased the land on which their homes were built. Those documents formed the basis for the appeal that is currently pending.

A spokesperson for the Supreme Court denied the claim, however, when asked for clarification by the IDF.

As a result, the IDF commander was told by legal counsel not to wait for confirmation. Rather, he was told to simply go ahead and destroy seven private homes and a kindergarten at Ma’ale Rehavam, according to a reporter from the Tazpit news agency on site. The AFP news agency reported that an additional three uninhabited structures were also destroyed.

The IDF officer proceeded to order his troops to demolish the buildings, leaving seven families with children homeless. Hundreds of security forces are on site at the community, where 34 families have built their homes.

“The demolition of homes is an expression of weakness and frailty of our hold in Israel,” Perl said in a statement following the destruction. “But we are not deterred and will not be silent We will continue to build and expand Gush Etzion roots everywhere. We came to this country to build and be built. The time has come to announce to the world our sovereignty over this land.”

Two more Jewish communities, both in Samaria, are slated for similar actions by the government wrecking crews this week: Ramat Gilad near Shechem (Nablus) and in Givat Asaf in the Binyamin region.

Similar demolition orders are rarely issued, let alone carried out against the thousands of illegally-constructed Bedouin and Arab structures dotting the Israeli landscape within the 1949 Armistice lines (known as the “pre-1967 lines.) They are never carried out against the hundreds of thousands carpeting the hillsides in the territory of Area C.

51 Dead in as Egyptians Celebrate 40th Anniversary of Yom Kippur War

Monday, October 7th, 2013

Deadly clashes erupted in Cairo on Sunday as pro-Morsi marches protesting the military junta rule headed to Tahrir Square, where thousands were cheering the same junta, celebrating the 40th anniversary of the army’s 1973 “victory” against Israel.

Confrontations there and outside Cairo resulted so far in the death toll rising to 51, according to Al Ahram, with 268 injured.

Egypt’s Interior Ministry said security forces arrested 423 people during clashes in Cairo and Giza.

The National Alliance to Support Legitimacy, a coalition of Islamist forces supporting deposed president Mohamed Morsi, said at least 11 had been killed in clashes with security forces in Ramses Street in central Cairo.

Official news agency MENA also reported that gunshots were heard amidst the clashes on Ramses Street.

Backers of Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood have staged thousand-strong marches in several parts of Cairo, Giza and other governorates, Al Ahram reported.

Rallies took a violent turn in central Cairo’s Garden City and Giza’s Dokki district, where police fired rounds of teargas after local residents clashed during pro-Morsi protests heading towards Tahrir, eyewitnesses and Ahram Online reporters said. The sound of heavy gunfire was later reported, as well as army jets and F-16 fighters hovering in formations over Cairo, Alexandria and other cities.

Each year, Egypt’s army traditionally celebrates the state holiday commemorating the October war against Israel—which eventually led to the recovery of the Sinai Peninsula through peace negotiations—with military performances and flyovers.

Egypt has been gripped by prolonged violence since the overthrow of Morsi on 3 July after mass demonstrations against his turbulent year in office.

The ouster of the former elected president, which was part of a roadmap agreed upon by many political groups and the armed forces, has enraged Islamists who have denounced the move as a violation of democratic “legitimacy.”

Hundreds were killed on 14 August when security forces moved to forcibly disperse two protest camps set up by Morsi loyalists in Cairo and Giza, unleashing days of violent turmoil and deepening polarization.

Militants elsewhere have taken up arms against the state. The army has been battling an insurgency in the Sinai Peninsula, adjoining Israel and the Palestinian Gaza Strip, where Islamist terrorists have mounted almost daily attacks on security and army targets, killing dozens.

Egypt Coptic Christian Leadership Condemns Western Media Coverage

Tuesday, August 20th, 2013

In the face of an unprecedented wave of violence directed against Coptic Christians amid the turmoil in Egypt that has left hundred’s dead, the church’s leadership issued a statement condemning the Western media’s biased coverage of the events in Egypt.

“We strongly denounce the fallacies broadcasted by the Western media and invite them to review the facts objectively regarding these bloody radical organizations and their affiliates instead of legitimizing them with global support and political protection while they attempt to spread devastation and destruction in our dear land,” reads the statement, according to a Google translation.

“We request that the international and western media adhere to providing a comprehensive account of all events with truth, accuracy, and honesty,” the statement added.

The Coptic Church also reaffirmed its support for the military-backed government, calling on the army and security forces to continue their fight against the “armed violent groups and black terrorism.”

One of the oldest communities in Christianity, Coptic Christians have survived numerous persecutions in the past. But the recent violence is unprecedented. The Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR), an independent human rights organization, has documented 39 attacks against Coptic Christian churches, schools, monasteries and businesses since late last week, NPR reported.

Coptic Christians constituted a majority of Egypt’s population until the Middle Ages, when Islam, introduced by the Arab invasions in the 7th century, eclipsed their religion. Today, Coptic Christianity comprises nearly 10 percent of Egypt’s 85 million people, making it the largest single Christian community remaining in the Middle East.

S.O.S.: USA, UN, Europe, Go Help Egypt and Leave Israel Alone

Wednesday, August 14th, 2013

There’s a real dangerous emergency situation going on in Egypt.  It started with the “Arab Spring” there not long ago which was celebrated by United States President Obama and other Leftist peace groupies.

 At least 15 people are reported to have been killed as Egyptian security forces moved in to clear two protest camps occupied by supporters of deposed president Mohammed Morsi in Cairo. But the Muslim Brotherhood, which backs the protests, put the number of casualties much higher. Bursts of gunfire were heard and armoured bulldozers moved in. Security forces fired tear gas. BBC

Poets love to describe “spring” as the sweet smell of flowers and freshly cut grass in the spring, but this spring smells more like the sickly stink of a lot of broken bottles of cheap perfume in a closed space. There has been a lot of blood spilled, too.

Looking back at Obama’s speech:

The comments came in Obama’s most comprehensive response to date to the uprisings sweeping the Arab world. Speaking at the State Department, he called for the first time for the leader of Syria to embrace democracy or move aside, though without specifically demanding his ouster. As he addressed audiences abroad and at home, Obama sought to leave no doubt that the U.S. stands behind the protesters who have swelled from nation to nation across the Middle East and North Africa, while also trying to convince American viewers that U.S. involvement in unstable countries halfway around the world is in their interest, too. Obama said the United States has a historic opportunity and the responsibility to support the rights of people clamoring for freedoms, and he called for “a new chapter in American diplomacy.” “We know that our own future is bound to this region by the forces of economics and security; history and faith,” the president said. He hailed the killing of al-Qaida terrorist leader Osama bin Laden and declared that bin Laden’s vision of destruction was fading even before U.S. forces shot him dead. Obama said the “shouts of human dignity are being heard across the region.” The president noted that two leaders had stepped down – referring to Egypt and Tunisia – and said that “more may follow.” He quoted civilian protesters who have pushed for change in Egypt, Libya, Syria and Yemen but noted that among those nations, only Egypt has seen the departure of a long-ruling autocratic leader.

If Israel has any questions, as it should, about American expertise in understanding the Arab mentality and culture of “democracy,” it should just consult with Egypt’s Morsi.

As of just a few extremely short years ago, Egypt was a bastion of stability in the Arab world.  That’s  why many Israeli politicians of the Right and Left agreed that PM Menachem Begin had done the right thing to give the Sinai to Egypt.  I davka disagree with them, as does Caroline Glick.



As the intervening 32 years since the treaty was signed have shown, in essence, the deal was nothing more than a ceasefire. Israel surrendered the entire Sinai Peninsula to Egypt and in exchange, Egypt has not staged a military attack against Israel from its territory.

The peace treaty’s critics maintain that the price Israel paid was too high and so the treaty was unjustified. They also argue that Israel set a horrible precedent for future negotiations with its neighbors by ceding the entire Sinai in exchange for the treaty. Moreover, they note that Palestinian autonomy agreement in the treaty was a terrible deal. And it set the framework for the disastrous Oslo peace process with the PLO 15 years later.

For their part, supporters of the treaty claim that the precedent it set was terrific for Israel. The treaty cites the borders of the Palestine Mandate as Israel’s legal borders. And since the Mandate envisioned a Jewish state on both banks of the Jordan River, at a minimum the peace treaty sets a precedent for a future annexation of the west bank of the Jordan. -Caroline Glick

But with the explosive situation in Egypt, things can get much worse once a ruler decides to distract the people from their own problems.

Considering that the American brokered “peace sic plan” hinges on the reliability and stability of an Arab terror state that doesn’t exist, and the precedent of a treaty that is on the verge of collapse, I think we should cut our losses and get on with building our country, the State of Israel.

Visit Shiloh Musings.

Update: 250 Killed as Police Crush Cairo Sit-Ins

Wednesday, August 14th, 2013

Update from Sky News: More than 250 people have reportedly been killed as Egyptian security forces cleared two protest camps loyal to deposed president Mohamed Morsi.

Sky’s Sam Kiley, reporting from the Rabaa al Adawiya camp in Cairo, said it was “under very heavy gunfire” and was a “massive military assault on largely unarmed civilians in very large numbers”.

He added: “There are machine gun rounds and snipers on the roof that are preventing people from getting any closer to the field hospital.


Egyptian police broke up a Muslim Brotherhood sit-in near the Giza zoo in Cairo, in an attempt to clear the other at Rabaa El-Adawiya square after dawn on Wednesday. Egypt’s caretaker government has pledged to disperse the thousands of Islamists who were gathered in both venues, al Ahram reports.

The Cairo ambulance authority said five were killed and at least 52 wounded, but the Brotherhood put the death toll at 121, citing reports from a makeshift hospital located near the Rabaa sit-in.

Egypt’s state television said two policemen were killed and six wounded during the attempt to clear out the two sit-ins. All entrances to the sites are blocked by security forces.

Some 200 protesters were arrested on charges of carrying firearms, knives and gas canisters, the state news agency MENA reported.

“In accordance with government instructions to take necessary measures towards the sit-ins at Rabaa Al-Adawiya and Nahda, and for the safety of the country, security forces started taking measures to disperse the sit-ins early Wednesday,” the interior ministry said in a statement.”

Live television footage showed riot police firing tear gas at protesters at one of the entrances of Rabaa El-Adawiya mosque in northern Cairo, where tens of thousands have been camping for six weeks to demand the reinstatement of ousted President Mohamed Morsi.

Brotherhood spokesman Gehad El-Haddad accused police snipers of firing at Rabaa protesters from the rooftop of surrounding buildings.

Al-Nahar and ONTV satellite channels said their cameras were confiscated by police.

At the Nahda camp, extending down a palm tree-lined boulevard next to the Cairo zoo in Giza, police used loudspeakers to urge protesters to leave as sounds of gunfire rang out.

“Armed men in both camps fired at police forces once they started dispersing the sit-ins … police were able to control Nahda and are still combing the surrounding area,” the interior ministry said in another statement on its official Facebook page.

“The police forces only used tear gas despite being attacked by live ammunition [from protesters].”


Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/brotherhood-overall-death-toll-may-reach-121-as-police-crush-sit-ins/2013/08/14/

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