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January 21, 2017 / 23 Tevet, 5777

Posts Tagged ‘Shas’

Shas Interior Minister Deri Wants UN to Intervene on Aleppo

Tuesday, December 13th, 2016

Minister of Interior Aryeh Deri urged Prime Minister Netanyahu on Tuesday to convene an emergency session of the UN Security Council to discuss the civilian casualties and reports of massacres in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo.

“During the Holocaust six million Jews were killed and the world was silent. We, as Jews, cannot remain silent in light of the horrors that have occurred for almost six years in Syria, “said Deri. “The increase in massacres in Aleppo obliges us as Jews, as a people who suffered a terrible Holocaust and grave massacres, to raise a public outcry,” he stated.

Aleppo has been a flashpoint in the bloody civil war that grew out of the Arab Spring of 2011 between Syrian rebels and the regime of President Bashar al-Assad.

On Monday, December 12, Russian Defense Ministry spokesperson Major-General Igor Konashenkov said the Syrian government had regained control of 96 percent of Aleppo’s territory since its forces had entered the eastern part of the city in November.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights also reported Monday that forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad, with massive support from Russian air strikes and Iranian Shi’ite militias, had taken the Sheikh Saeed district in eastern Aleppo after fierce fighting that began Sunday afternoon.

The United Nations Office of Human Rights says it has evidence that 82 civilians were shot on sight in eastern Aleppo when pro-government forces entered their homes. Thousands more fled the city ahead of Assad’s takeover.

The fall of Aleppo could mark the approaching final days of the Syrian rebel armies, bringing Syria closer to an end of the civil war and a return of Assad regime control over the country’s five major cities.

The last attempt by the United Nations to impose a seven-day humanitarian truce came on December 6. It was an attempt to permit the removal of wounded and sick from the city and delivery of food and medicine to those within. The effort, however, was met with a veto by both the Russian Federation and China.

Israel’s strategy with regards to the Syrian civil war has been one of neutrality and non-intervention. The IDF has restricted its actions to providing medical support in the form of a field hospital in the Golan Heights, and thwarting the transfers of weapons of mass destruction to Lebanese-based Hezbollah through war-torn Syria, with the tacit agreement of Russia.

Minister Deri did not say how Israel, which does not have a seat on the Security Council, could convene the body, nor did he elaborate on how such a session would overcome the current deadlock.

Ilana Messika at TPS contributed content for this article.

Hana Levi Julian

Shas For Sale

Thursday, November 24th, 2016

Yosef owned a small Shas that he had bought six years ago, when he first entered yeshiva. It was in good condition, but it was an old printing. When Yosef got engaged, his chevrusa bought him another Shas with a new printing.

“I’ve wanted the new edition for a while,” said Yosef appreciatively. “What can I do with the old Shas?”

“You can leave it for sale on the table outside the beis midrash,” said his chevrusa. “Maybe someone will buy it.”

Yosef put the Shas on the table with a note: “Shas for sale. $30 – Please give money to Yosef or leave in the envelope at his table.”

Two days later, Moshe met Yosef at supper and said: “I’d like to buy your Shas, but I have to run home now.”

“Fine!” said Yosef. “It’s outside the beis midrash; take it when you want.”

“I don’t have money with me,” said Moshe. “Can I pay you tomorrow?”

“No problem,” said Yosef. “It’s yours.”

Meanwhile, Shalom saw the Shas that evening and decided to buy it. He took the Shas and put it on his table. He placed $30 in the envelope and wrote his name on it.

When Moshe came in the morning, he saw the Shas was gone. “Someone took the Shas,” he said to Yosef.

“I know, Shalom bought it,” said Yosef. “When I came this morning there was money in the envelope.”

Moshe went over to Shalom. “When did you buy the Shas?” he asked.

“Last night about 10,” Shalom said.

“I had already spoken with Yosef at supper and he agreed to sell the Shas to me,” said Moshe. “It’s mine.”

“But I took it first,” said Shalom, “so it’s mine!”

Yosef heard them arguing, each one claiming ownership. “Why don’t we ask Rabbi Dayan?” he suggested.

The three went to Rabbi Dayan. “Whom does the Shas belong to?” asked Yosef.

“If, in fact, you had already agreed to sell the Shas to Moshe, Shalom has no claim to it; you can award it to whomever you want, with a preference to Moshe,” answered Rabbi Dayan. “However, if Shalom does not trust that you had already agreed to sell and there is no proof, he can keep the Shas.”

Both Shalom and Moshe asked for an explanation.

“When Yosef initially put the Shas for sale, he expressed willingness to sell it to anyone,” explained Rabbi Dayan. “However, when he agreed to sell it to Moshe, he was no longer interested in selling it to anyone else. Shalom cannot acquire it without Yosef’s consent. Although the Shas remained on the table with a ‘for sale’ note, it no longer expresses intent to sell.”

“If so, shouldn’t the Shas be mine?” asked Moshe. “Yosef agreed to sell it to me at supper!”

“Halacha requires an act of kinyan to confirm a transaction,” replied Rabbi Dayan. “Agreement alone to sell does not finalize it. Thus, you also didn’t acquire the Shas, so Yosef can grant it to Shalom. However, it is unethical and untrustworthy to retract from an agreement, so it is preferable that he grant it to you.” (C.M. 189:1; 204:11)

“What if Shalom does not trust that I had already agreed to sell?” asked Yosef.

“He can claim he acquired the Shas while it was still for sale by picking it up,” said Rabbi Dayan. “He is now in possession, since it is in hands, and we would apply the rule of hamotzi meichaveiro alav har’aya – the burden of proof is on the plaintiff. You are not believed without proof to say that you retracted from your intent to sell, to take the Shas back from Shalom or grant it to Moshe.” (C.M. 222:1,4)

Rabbi Meir Orlian

Israel Revokes Citizenship of Arab Plotting to Kidnap, Kill IDF Soldier

Friday, October 21st, 2016

An Arab holding an A-5 visa for the past 16 years granting him temporary resident status on the strength of his marriage to an Israeli citizen had that citizenship revoked Thursday night.

Interior Minister Arye Deri ordered officials to revoke the citizenship of Hani Massoud Nasir Abu Amra, originally from Deir Al-Balah.

Abu Amra received temporary resident status in 2000 for “family unification” after his marriage, and lived in the Bedouin town of Tel Sheva.

“A situation in which citizens use their status to commit terror attacks against Israeli citizens is something I intend to fight completely and relentlessly,” Deri said in a statement Thursday night. “I will take any steps necessary and use all available legal means to counter these dangers.”

He was a member of a terrorist cell recruited by Mahmoud Yusuf Hasin Abu Taha, a member of the Palestinian Islamic Jihad terrorist organization. Abu Taha, who was recruited by a senior member of the terrorist organization, was indicted Thursday on terror-related charges.

Abu Amra and two other cell members were arrested Thursday and charged with plotting to attack a wedding hall in southern Israel where one of the three, a Gaza resident who had infiltrated into Israel, was illegally employed as a worker.

The group also allegedly planned to abduct and murder and Israeli soldier, using his dead body as a bargaining chip in subsequent prison swap negotiations with Israel.

The three terrorists were taken into custody by Shin Bet intelligence agents and the Negev Central Unit of the Israel Police.

Hana Levi Julian

Former Shas MK: Solve Train Problem the Jewish Way – Use Goyim

Monday, September 5th, 2016

Former MK Rabbi Haim Amsalem told the website Srugim Sunday that Jewish Law provides a simple and practical solution to the problem of performing crucial infrastructure labor on Israel’s railroads on Shabbat, a problem which was threatening the stability of Prime Minister Netanyahu’s coalition government: use gentile employees.

“The simplest solution would be to follow what Jewish Halakha says and facilitates,” Rabbi Amsalem advised. “In a country where 20% of the citizens are not Jewish, when there is a compelling need, we can utilize ‘goy shel Shabbat,’ (‘Shabbes goy’) for all the labor that involves the desecration of Shabbat. We’ve done this for hundreds of years, everybody is familiar with the concept — the gentiles would receive an increased pay and Jews wouldn’t be required to work on and desecrate the Shabbat,” Rabbi Amsalem said, noting that “everybody is for a modern and democratic Jewish State, so this should be a fitting solution.”

Rabbi Haim (Emile) Amsalem, 57, a native of French Algeria who immigrated to Israel in 1970, was among the founders of Shas and served as its MK, until, following a breakup with his colleagues, he launched his own party, Am Shalem (a play on his name, meaning “whole nation”) that failed to make it into the Knesset in the 2013 elections. He is considered a moderate Haredi who believes in a dialogue with secular Israelis.

“In general, it can be stated that the state institutions for the most part observe Shabbat, which is something anyone arriving in Israel from abroad notices. It may not be exactly as we want it to be, but we can’t focus only on the negative,” Amsalem told Srugim.

Pointing out that the law already provides for government to be able to issue permits for Shabbat work that relates to security, crucial economic concerns or any other matter affecting the public’s welfare, including hospitals, the power and the water utilities, Amsalem suggested that the clash over the railroad works over the past two Shabbat days was mostly about politics.

“In the end, those who cry out for the alleged honor of Shabbat ends up causing a much bigger, mass desecration. We strive to reach as broad an agreement as possible on the value of Shabbat, of its image and its respect by the public. Our role as rabbis is to take care of Shabbat observance, but when it is necessary we must find halakhic solutions that would facilitate a normative existence for society at large, and won’t cause hatred for Shabbat on the part of the public,” Amsalem said.

“In a Jewish State it is permissible to employ those for whom those vital works on Shabbat are permissible,” Amsalem concluded. “This way the needs of the modern state would be fulfilled while the demand of our Torah regarding Shabbat observance in public would be obeyed.”

JNi.Media

New Poll Sees Israeli Left Collapsing, Purely Rightwing Coalition Government

Thursday, August 11th, 2016

Following the surprising results of a GeoCartographia poll a week ago, showing Likud down from 30 to 25 seats, the Zionist Camp (Labor) dropping from 24 to 8 seats, Habayit Hayehudi soaring from 8 to 16 seats, and Yesh Atid rocketing from 11 to 22 seats, on Thursday a new poll by Maagar Mochot (Heb: Think Tank) showed a more moderate reflection of the same trend. The new poll, conducted for FM103 Radio, shows Likud still in first place with 27 seats (3 fewer than its current mandate), Habayit Hayehudi rising, but only to 13 seats (a +5), Yisrael Beiteinu gaining 4 seats to rise from 5 to 9 seats, and Yesh Atid still soundly beating its identical twin at the center, Kulanu, as Yair Lapid’s party rises from 11 to 21 seats, while Moshe Kahlon’s Kulanu drops from 11 to 6 seats.

On the left, the Zionist Camp (Labor) slows down its sharp drop, and scores 10 seats, compared with its current 24 (the other poll gave it only 8). Meretz picks up one seat to rise to 6 seats, and the Joint Arab List maintains its 13 seats.

The Haredi block stands at 15 seats (last poll gave it 18), with Shas at 8 (+1) and United Torah Judaism at 7 (+1).

The ideological map reflected in the new poll is most encouraging to the rightwing parties: 49 seats go to the three rightwing Zionist parties, and 15 to the Haredim, meaning that Prime Minister Netanyahu, in his fifth term, could easily put together a rightwing government relying on a workable 64-seat majority, without ambiguous center-right partners such as Kahlon. The question then would become, does Netanyahu actually want a purely rightwing government, which would likely expect him to impose Israeli law in Area C, change the rules of engagement, invest heavily in Jewish expansion in Judea and Samaria, alter the undemocratic way in which Israel’s judges are picked, and a myriad other burning issues which so far he had been reluctant to pursue, blaming it on his more secular, centrist partners.

The rightwing parties could possibly combine their numbers to boycott either Kahlon or Lapid, or both, from the future coalition government — the Haredim because they despise Lapid, Habayit Hayehudi and Yisrael Beiteinu because they’d like to pursue an aggressive agenda in Judea and Samaria, where a good portion of their constituency resides.

Our friend Jeremy Saltan, a.k.a. Knesset Jeremy, who moonlights as HaBayit HaYehudi’s Anglo Forum Chairman, has launched the Israeli Poll of Polls, strictly for political addicts. Here’s his most recent handiwork, copied from his website.

 

Party KnessetJeremy Polling Average (June/July/August) Change since previous KJPA (April/May) KJPA (April/May) All Polls since Elections 2015 Election
Likud 25.3 -1.4 26.7 26.4 30
Yesh Atid 20.3 0.3 20 19.3 11
Bayit Yehudi 13.5 2.2 11.3 12 8
Joint List 13 0.2 12.8 12.8 13
Zionist Union 11 -1.8 12.8 14.4 24
UTJ 8.8 0.8 8 7.5 6
Yisrael Beitenu 8.2 -0.8 9 8.4 6
Kulanu 6.8 0 6.8 6.7 10
Shas 6.7 1 5.7 6.5 7
Meretz 6.3 -0.5 6.8 6 5
Right-Religious 69.3 1.7 67.5 67.4 67
Center-Left-Arab 50.7 -1.7 52.5 52.6 53

 

 

JNi.Media

Knesset Committee Slams Finance Minister on Fear of Fighting Monopolies

Tuesday, July 5th, 2016

“Five years have passed, and prices have not gone down, and in certain cases they have gone up,” members of the Knesset Finance Committee told government representatives during Monday’s meeting marking five years since the summer of 2011 popular social protest in Israel.

The committee members slammed Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon for “being afraid to fight the monopolies,” but members of Kahlon’s Kulanu party said in response, “We are advancing many reforms, and we can already see the results on the ground.”

Finance Committee Chairman MK Moshe Gafni (United Torah Judaism) said that “with all due respect to the Finance Ministry and talks of reform, in practice the prices have not gone down.”

MK Uri Maklev (United Torah Judaism) said, “Five years after the ‘cottage cheese’ protest, not only have the prices not gone down, in real terms they have increased, because the prices of commodities around the world have dropped 30-50%, and this is not being reflected in the Israeli market. Prices are 20% higher, on average, than in Europe. The prices of inputs have also decreased, as has the price of gas and energy, but this has not had any effect. What happened is that the monopolies and chain stores have gained huge profits at the consumers’ expense.”

MK Manuel Trajtenberg (Zionist Camp) explained that “the expense basket of a young family has three main components: housing, education and food. In housing the prices have only gone up; in education there has been some progress regarding ages 3-4, but not a week goes by that we are not asked to answer questions regarding family expenses related to education. An average family with three children spends some $1,300 a month on education, day care, afternoon child care, camps, and more. As far as food is concerned, some positive steps have been taken, but that nut has not been cracked and, ultimately, too much power has been left in the hands of a small number of companies.”

MK Yitzhak Vaknin (Shas) charged that the Trajtenberg Committee, which examined and proposed solutions to Israel’s socioeconomic problems, was established only to “ease tensions” and “take the wind out of the social protest’s sails.” In practice, he said, “nothing has been done.” Vaknin called to restore price controls, saying “in the absence of competition, this is the solution.”

MK Oren Hazan (Likud) said the problem is “greed.” The chain store owners and the major wholesalers “earn tens of millions on the public’s back,” he stated. “And meanwhile, here in the Knesset, people are strong at talking. The finance minister can make bold decisions and change the market without fearing his friends the tycoons. Here in this committee we have the power to advance a plan to dissolve the monopolies. We will enact a law to that effect.”

MK Roy Folkman of Kulanu said, “We have waged an all-out war on the monopolies. In Israel there is a very high concentration of market controls, and a finance minister who does not fear them has now arrived. We launched reforms in the importing of fresh meat and the prices have dropped. With fish as well, we created parallel importing. For years no one has dared to deal with the monopolies, which maintain a stronghold on Israeli politics, and we have started doing so. A change can already be seen in toiletries, food items, children’s toys and other items. The fight takes courage and ability. Increasing competition is the only way. Price control does not work; [corporations] would only raise the prices of other items. The business sector is more sophisticated than the regulator.”

MK Rachel Azaria, also from Kulanu, said “We are making great efforts, but every issue that reaches the Knesset gets stuck there. Every reform encounters objections, and it is nearly impossible to pass anything, including the fight against black market capital. I belong to the finance minister’s faction and it is my job to pass things, but nothing can be advanced; there are always dramas here; in some cases it’s the kibbutzim, in others kashrut – everybody has an interest. We have to be brave and deal with the basic problems: monopolies, quotas and interested bodies that prevent change. In the Arrangements Law we will introduce important reforms, and then we will see if all those who are yelling here will support them. We are the cause of the high prices. We have an opportunity to lower the cost of living, and I hope everyone here will support [the measures].”

JNi.Media

Secular Israeli Parents Say Religious Summer Camps ‘A Better Deal’

Thursday, June 30th, 2016

Secular Israeli parents are enrolling their children in Orthodox Jewish summer camps this year, despite the dress code requirements.

The reason? It’s just a better deal.

Prices for summer camps in Israel are soaring, with fees for the typical municipal program costing as much NIS 3,000 for even the youngest campers in the kindergarten “bunks.”

In the religiously observant summer camps, children are required to dress modestly; girls wear skirts and sleeves, and boys wear yarmulkas. A resident of Bat Yam interviewed by the Hebrew-language Mynet website said it was a matter of being practical. “Instead of paying 3,000 shekels for a daughter at an urban camp I pay 450 shekels,” he said. “What does it matter if the child needs to go with a skirt? If the secular summer camps want us, they have to cut prices.”

In accordance with the Ministry of Development of the Periphery and the Galilee, a certain percentage of the students are entitled to subsidized municipal camp scholarships. But many families are not entitled to these benefits and face skyrocketing costs in having to find ways to keep their children busy during the hot summer months.

For working parents, that dilemma is a nightmare. “When I opened the envelope with the registration form for the municipal summer camp for my children I was horrified,” Natalie S. told JewishPress.com. A resident of the northern Negev development town of Arad, she and her husband both work full time.

“There was no way that I and my husband could afford more than 2,000 shekels per child for each of our two toddlers for a two-week program this summer, and to keep the kids home was simply not an option,” she said. “It’s not fair. How do people do this, and what are we supposed to do with them the rest of the summer? How am I supposed to keep my job while we figure this out?”

In Bat Yam, a number of secular families decided the solution lay in a network of private hareidi-religious summer camps where the fee was barely a fifth of the price. One of the parents interviewed by Mynet declined to reveal the name of the camp, fearing their children would be rejected, since they did not share their secular beliefs with the camp.

“I am sure the director knows the truth and there are many families like ours,” the parent said.

One of the camps operated in the city this summer is Bnei Zion, associated with the Sephardic religious Shas party and designed for school-age girls. The tuition is NIS 450 for a three-week session, including Fridays, according to the camp’s director, Yosef Rachamim. The program includes field trips, inflatables, a trip to the Jaffa port, a picnic, a barbecue, swimming pool time and other attractions.

Hana Levi Julian

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/secular-israeli-parents-say-religious-summer-camps-a-better-deal/2016/06/30/

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