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June 30, 2016 / 24 Sivan, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘shavuot’

Woman, Child Attacked in French Hill

Monday, June 13th, 2016

A Jewish woman and her child were attacked by an Arab man in French Hill during the holiday of Shavuot.

Police tracked down the attacker shortly after he fled the scene and arrested him.

The woman and her child were treated at the scene and then evacuated with minor wounds to a local hospital by paramedics from the Magen David Adom emergency medical response service.

Jewish Press News Briefs

In Spirit of Shavuot, Two Tons of Dairy Donated to Needy in Israel

Friday, June 10th, 2016

Ra’anana (TPS) – Nearly two tons of dairy products were donated to Israel’s national food bank, Leket Israel, for the upcoming Jewish holiday of Shavuot on Sunday – on which Jews traditionally consume healthy helpings of dairy. Strauss Group, one of Israel’s leading dairy distributors, passed out large quantities of dairy products, including cheese, yogurt, and other dairy delicacies to feed Israel’s poor over the holiday.

“We are extraordinarily pleased with this generous donation of dairy in honor of Shavuot, and we are very appreciative of the loyal partnership that we have with Strauss Group throughout the year,” commented Shai Davaroff, vice president of logistics at Leket Israel.

Shavuot, also known as the Festival of Weeks or Pentecost, is the biblical holiday celebrating the annual grain harvest and, according to Jewish tradition, commemorates the day on which the Ten Commandments were given to the Israelites from atop Mt. Sinai. Somewhere along the way, a custom developed to consume copious amounts of dairy – cheesecake being a popular Shavuot treat – though the precise reason remains obscure.

Davaroff told Tazpit Press Service (TPS) that Strauss Group contributes dairy products throughout the year to Leket Israel and that this year the company had extra stock to give out.

Leket Israel, whose primary logistics center is based in Ra’anana, is the country’s largest food rescue organization, and works to alleviate nutritional insecurity among Israel’s poor by redistributing food that would have gone to waste. The organization has forged partnership with catering companies, restaurants, bakeries, supermarkets, corporate cafeterias, private farmers, local green grocers, and wholesale food suppliers that donate surplus food.

Volunteers and staff members then collect the donated products and distribute and deliver the food to soup kitchens, food pantries, day care and senior citizen centers, as well as homeless shelters and other non-profit organizations serving the needy.

Lavaroff noted that in the spirit of Shavuot, Leket Israel also has volunteers and staff gleaning the land’s produce during the weeks leading up to the holiday as well as throughout the rest of the year. The initiative is called Project Leket, began in 2005 and has thousands of people picking in orchards and fields, and rescuing thousands of tons of agricultural crops left to rot at the end of each season.

“We have volunteers and workers working fields across Israel, from the Arava to the Golan. They go to pick whatever produce has been slated to be thrown away because it may be deformed, for example,” said Davaroff.

Every month, Leket Israel collects 1,000 tons of agricultural produce and 146,000 hot meals from restaurants and caterers. The organization distributes rescued food to over 175,000 people in need on a weekly basis through its partnership with 195 organizations across the country.

“It’s a win-win situation for everyone involved,” concluded Davaroff.

Anav Silverman, Tazpit News Agency

Preparing for Shavuot

Friday, June 10th, 2016

Shul Shavuot

Photo of the Day

Rav Bina’s Shavuot Message

Friday, June 10th, 2016

Video of the Day

Shavuot: Heavy On The Customs, Light On The Laws

Friday, June 10th, 2016

Where is the section called “Hilchot Shavuot” in the Shulchan Aruch? Actually, there is no section called Hilchot Shavuot because Shavuot does not have its own section in the Shulchan Aruch.

Instead, the last chapter of Hilchot Pesach is called “Seder Tefillat Chag HaShavuot” and it contains just three short sentences. The Shulchan Aruch simply lists the order of davening for Shavuot, the Torah portions that are read, and the prohibition of fasting on the Yom Tov.

What stands out is the lack of any specific halachot for Shavuot. There is no matzah, no sitting in a sukkah, no shaking a lulav, and no blowing of the shofar.

There is nothing that marks Shavuot as a unique Yom Tov from the halachic prospective of the Shulchan Aruch. The Rama adds some Shavuot customs but not halachot. The customs he mentions are putting out plants in shuls and houses and eating dairy foods.

Even staying up all night on Shavuot is only a custom, not halacha.

It’s a seemingly odd situation. Even the shtei halechem and bikurim were brought only during the time of the Beit HaMikdash.

So we are left with the phenomenon of a festival that is heavy on minhagim but light on halachic imperatives, making this Yom Tov different from all others,

The Talmud (Pesachim 68), in discussing the best way to celebrate the festivals, relates a dispute between R’ Eliezer and R’ Yehoshua.

R’ Eliezer says Yom Tov should be spent either kulo laHashem – entirely praying to God and learning Torah –or kulo lachem – entirely as a day of eating and drinking and other physical enjoyment.

R’ Yehoshua says the festivals should be divided in half, chetzyo laHashem and chetzyo lachem – half for God and half for us.

But even R’ Eliezer agrees that Shavuot must also include physical enjoyment through feasting, because it is the day on which God gave us the Torah.

Rashi explains that we need to show we are still joyful about accepting the Torah and therefore we need to celebrate in a physical manner. Shavuot cannot be only a day of ritual halachic structure; in order for us to demonstrate our joy and happiness at accepting the Torah, Shavuot must include our human input.

Our physical and human enjoyment of Shavuot is described in the Talmud as involving eating and drinking. Of course, over the generations Jews have added various customs to the celebration of Shavuot, but food and drink remain the central focus of our minhagim.

To show our joy in accepting the Torah anew every year, we imbue this festival with delicious new meaning, such as eating cheesecake, cheese blintzes (my favorite), and decorating our synagogues and homes with flowers.

This is how we demonstrate our love for the Yom Tov that celebrates the great gift God gave us when He entrusted us with His holy Torah.

Rabbi Ephraim S. Sprecher

How to Match Wine and Cheeses Like a Pro

Friday, June 10th, 2016

Wine and cheese go together so well that it’s practically a cliché. The naturally opposing flavours create an excellent dining experience. But, not every cheese is suited to every wine, so in time for Shavuot, here are some tips from Debby Sion, Head of Wine Education at the Golan Heights Winery:

Soft and soft-ripened cheese: e.g. Brie, Camembert, Feta Soft cheeses go best with aromatic dry white wines that have a fruity character. Suggested white wines: Gamla Chardonnay, Yarden Viognier, Galil Avivim. Suggested red wines: Gamla Pinot Noir and Yarden Pinot Noir.

Blue-veined cheese: Blue cheeses tend to have a sharp and salty character, a crumbly texture and a strong smell. Paradoxically the most suitable types of wine are sweet wines or dessert wines. Suggested sweet wines: Yarden Muscat or Yarden Heightswine.

Goat cheese: e.g. Chèvre The high proportion of fatty acids in goat’s milk give these cheeses a tart flavour that pairs well with a refreshing dry white wine, Recommended wines: Yarden Sauvignon Blanc, Galil Sauvignon Blanc, Yarden Mount Hermon White, Gamla Brut.

Sharp cheese: e.g. aged Gouda, sharp Cheddar, mature Stilton These are strong flavoured cheeses are balanced best by deep and complex wines. Recommended wines: Yarden Cabernet Sauvignon, Yarden Merlot, Galil Alon.

Hard and Semi-Hard Cheese: e.g. Gruyère and Emmental Hard cheeses can be described as sweet yet with a slightly salty quality. These cheeses pair well with light reds or buttery, fragrant white wines. Recommended wines: Gamla Chardonnay, Galil Pinot Noir, Yarden Mount Hermon Red, Yarden Rose.

Very Hard Cheese: e.g. Parmesan, Pecorino
Hard cheeses have a very strong, compacted, salty flavour that pairs best with red wines Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon.
Recommended wines: Yarden Cabernet Sauvignon, Yarden Merlot, Yarden Blanc de Blanc, Galil Yiron.

Jewish Press Staff

Why I Go Grocery Shopping with an M-16 on My Back.

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

[Reposted from Facebook]

Several days ago I engaged with Leftist activists at the Jerusalem Day Parade, including Sarah Tuttle Singer and a friend of hers that did not give her name. They claimed Muslims in the Damascus Gate marketplace were friends of theirs.

I challenged them to go in and ask the first Muslim they find why the Muslims built a mosque on top of the Jewish Temple Mount?

I also challenged them to go ask their “friends” in what year did an Arab Palestine country, state Or land exist before Israel – and I will be there to watch the reaction.

Sarah’s friend claimed that my gun proves that I am not looking for peace. You see, liberals live in a make believe world so far out of reality it resembles a Disney cartoon. Jews are being slaughtered in the streets by Muslim terrorists, we are unable to walk through the gates of Jerusalem throughout the year, Jews are being shot, run over and murdered and the gun that I wear for self-defense proves that I don’t want peace?! They really have to stop sniffing that peace drug! This morning I went shopping at Rami Levy.

There were Muslims who were in the middle of Ramadan shopping and Jews shopping for Shabbat and the upcoming Shavuot holiday and I was there with my M-16 strapped over my back as well as my secondary weapon on my hip.

Not only were the Jews not nervous about the fact that I’m walking around with two guns, the Muslims knew that if a terrorist walks into that store, I will be protecting them just like everyone else. The guns that I and many other people wear are not a situation we asked for, they are a reaction to the situation we were forced into.

We did not start the wars, we did not ask for the wars And the fact that the Arabs lost the wars they started does not turn them into victims, only into losers.

I understand the world has gotten used to Jews picking up their arms and walking like sheep to the slaughterhouse, but they better wake up and understand, we will do whatever is needed to make sure that never happens again! I will not apologize for my guns nor will I apologize for unwilling to cooperate with the radical Islamic terrorists who want us once again to become victims.

I’m sorry the liberals in Israel have been struck with a fatal case of the Stockholm Syndrome and I’m happy the disease is not airborne. The cure? TRUTH!

The only person who would be nervous about my guns are the terrorists who are looking to murder my people and to them I say, be nervous and be scared!

This is why I spend my days and nights with Standing Together 24/7 IDF supporting IDF soldiers with whatever they need.

We must never apologize for our ability to fight back and defend ourselves, just like we should never apologize for winning the wars the Arabs started in order to destroy us and we certainly should not apologize for dancing through the streets of Jerusalem.

If you feel guilty for our ability to fight back, do not get upset at the world if they criticize us for doing so.

You convinced them that a Jew with a gun is the problem and not the reason we are forced to go shopping with an M-16 on our backs.

Ari Fuld

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/guest-blog/why-i-go-grocery-shopping-with-an-m-16-on-my-back/2016/06/09/

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