web analytics
April 19, 2014 / 19 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘Shiloh HaKeduma’

Two Week Countdown to Passover; Chodesh Nissan Tov!

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

April 1 was Rosh Chodesh Nissan, the first of the Jewish Month of Nissan, which also commemorates the very first Mitzvah, Commandment G-d gave to the People of Israel as a nation.

Nissan is the first month on the Jewish calendar. Before the Jews left Egypt, on the first day of the month of Nissan, G‑d told Moses and Aaron: “This chodesh (new moon, or month) shall be to you the head of months.” Thus the peculiarity of the Jewish calendar: the year begins on Rosh Hashanah, the first day of the month of Tishrei (the anniversary of the creation of Adam and Eve), but Tishrei is not the first month. Rosh Hashanah is actually referred to in the Torah as “the first day of the seventh month.”

As I do on every Rosh Chodesh, I was with a number of women from all over the country, praying together at Shiloh Hakeduma, Tel Shiloh.

I’ve been doing this for many years already. Shiloh is a very traditional place for prayer in Jewish History and tradition, especially for women. There is a very well-known story in the Bible about Chana (Hannah) who prayed there for a son. This son was not to be for her personal maternal needs. She prayed for a son who would be apprenticed to the Priests in the Mishkan, Tabernacle at Shiloh and then lead the Jewish People to the next stage, when he would anoint a king.

Chana’s son Shmuel, Samuel, was born after she had prayed in Shiloh. He was trained by Eli the High Priest and then ended up anointing not only the first king, Saul, but King David, too. King David’s dynasty is the most important in Jewish History. The Moshiach, Messiah will come from his descendants.

Women’s Rosh Chodesh Prayers are every Rosh Chodesh, 8:30am at Shiloh Hakeduma, Tel Shiloh. We don’t do a “women’s minyan,” but we do sing the Hallel Prayer together. We also tour the archaeological site and hear Divrei Torah, Torah lessons. More information can be found on this blog, Shiloh Musings.

 

                     

 

Shiloh Hakeduma is the actual site of the Biblical Shiloh. You’re welcome to join our facebook page. Tel Shiloh is open to visitors daily. Tours can be arranged through the Shiloh HaKeduma, Ancient Shiloh office. Email visit@telshilo.org.il  or phone 02-994-4019.


Visit  Shiloh Musings

What’s A Jew? Who’s A Jew?

Wednesday, February 19th, 2014

One thing I’ve been noticing over the years when at the Kotel is that more and more obviously non-Jews come to pray there.  As an ancient recognized holy spot for Jews, other people and religions also want the benefit of the “local call” to God.

That’s fine.  I’ve also seen it in Shiloh among those who come to Shiloh Hakeduma at Tel Shiloh to visit the site and also pray.  Christian groups have been coming for decades.  They consider the Jewish Bible and History as also theirs.  Even abroad, there are non-Jews who frequent the graves of Jewish people/rabbis etc considering them as not just spiritual mentors for Jews.  Don’t forget that Christians and the Muslims vie for the status of our replacement as God’s Chosen People.  Their biggest theological and logistic problem is that we not only still exist, but bli eyin haraa, we’re thriving in a successful country and active Diaspora.

Our biggest problem is that with Jewish success and acceptance there is terrible assimilation.  Many Jewish families or branches of Jewish families have ceased to exist as Jews. Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman brought up that subject in his address to the Presidents Conference.

However, the recently released results from the Pew survey on American Jewry make for pretty depressing reading. They demonstrate that there is a significant rise in those who have little or no Jewish content in their lives, marry outside the faith and are not raising their children Jewish, than from a similar survey taken ten years ago. The intermarriage rate has reached a high of 58% for all Jews, and 71% for non-Orthodox Jews, a huge change from before 1970 when only 17% of Jews intermarried.

On attitudes towards Israel we are witnessing a major generational gap. While 30% of respondents professed to be very attached to Israel and 39% said they felt “somewhat” attached, 31% answered that they felt not very or not at all attached to Israel. Asked whether caring about Israel was an “essential” part of being Jewish, only 43% answered in the affirmative, only one percentage point higher than those that responded “having a good sense of humor” was an essential part of being Jewish.

According to the researchers, older Jews are more likely than younger Jews to see caring about Israel as an essential part of what being Jewish means to them, with more than half of respondents over the age of 65 believing that caring about Israel was an essential part of their Jewish identity, whereas only 32% of respondents under the age of 30 shared the same belief.

This massive loss to the Jewish People also exists in my own family among my cousins and their children and grandchildren.

At this point in time, years decades after Conservative and Reform Jews have decided on their own criteria for conversion, there are many, many people who consider themselves Jewish but aren’t.  For strictly Torah observant Jews aka Orthodox to refuse to recognize them isn’t “discrimination” any more than it would be considered discrimination when a new immigrant who had been a doctor in his/her former country is required to study and qualify.

Visit Shiloh Musings.

Will We Have a Wintery Rosh Chodesh Kislev?

Tuesday, October 15th, 2013

This is almost a tongue-twister, except for the fact that the “w” sound isn’t very confusing for the tongue.

I’ve been organizing women’s prayers at Shiloh HaKeduma, Tel Shiloh, where the Biblical Chana successfully prayed for a son, for quite a number of years already.  There’s Rosh Chodesh, the First of the Jewish Month all year long, including the winter and very rarely have we found it too rainy to walk around the Tel, the digs all the way to where most experts think the ancient Mishkan Tabernacle had stood for three hundred and sixty nine 369 years.

382162_10200216053706825_680298096_n

This year’s upcoming Rosh Chodesh Kislev is a two-day one, the last of Cheshvan and the first of Kislev, Sunday November 3rd and Monday November 4th.  I asked some of the women who come to the prayers which they prefer, and nobody could give a definitive answer.  There’s always a chance that G-d willing it will rain on either or both days of Rosh Chodesh Kislev.

So I decided that it’s best to start the week off with our group prayers at one of the holiest sites in the HolyLand, Shiloh.

In all of the years I’ve been organizing the Rosh Chodesh prayers, we’ve almost never had too much rain to pray at or near the site of the Mishkan.  There are buildings in the Shiloh HaKeduma tourist site we can use as shelter if needed. For some of us with very busy schedules it’s hard to reschedule at a “moment’s notice.”  So I don’t see the point in saying that rain on Sunday means rescheduling until the following day, because it can rain even more heavily then.  And in the winter it is forbidden to pray for dry weather, since the rain is a blessing.  We only get rain in the winter, and if there isn’t enough rain it’s a curse, a punishment from G-d. So if it’s raining on 30 Cheshvan, then we will ask the workers in Shiloh HaKeduma for the use of a room.

Women’s Prayers at Tel Shiloh
Rosh Chodesh KislevSunday, November 3, 201330 Cheshvan 5774, 8:30am
Tour of Tel Shiloh & Dvar Torah, Short Torah Lesson
Please come and invite family, friends and neighbors

Please join us.

Visit Shiloh Musings.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/shiloh-musings/will-we-have-a-wintery-rosh-chodesh-kislev/2013/10/15/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: