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July 31, 2016 / 25 Tammuz, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘shopping’

Why I Go Grocery Shopping with an M-16 on My Back.

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

[Reposted from Facebook]

Several days ago I engaged with Leftist activists at the Jerusalem Day Parade, including Sarah Tuttle Singer and a friend of hers that did not give her name. They claimed Muslims in the Damascus Gate marketplace were friends of theirs.

I challenged them to go in and ask the first Muslim they find why the Muslims built a mosque on top of the Jewish Temple Mount?

I also challenged them to go ask their “friends” in what year did an Arab Palestine country, state Or land exist before Israel – and I will be there to watch the reaction.

Sarah’s friend claimed that my gun proves that I am not looking for peace. You see, liberals live in a make believe world so far out of reality it resembles a Disney cartoon. Jews are being slaughtered in the streets by Muslim terrorists, we are unable to walk through the gates of Jerusalem throughout the year, Jews are being shot, run over and murdered and the gun that I wear for self-defense proves that I don’t want peace?! They really have to stop sniffing that peace drug! This morning I went shopping at Rami Levy.

There were Muslims who were in the middle of Ramadan shopping and Jews shopping for Shabbat and the upcoming Shavuot holiday and I was there with my M-16 strapped over my back as well as my secondary weapon on my hip.

Not only were the Jews not nervous about the fact that I’m walking around with two guns, the Muslims knew that if a terrorist walks into that store, I will be protecting them just like everyone else. The guns that I and many other people wear are not a situation we asked for, they are a reaction to the situation we were forced into.

We did not start the wars, we did not ask for the wars And the fact that the Arabs lost the wars they started does not turn them into victims, only into losers.

I understand the world has gotten used to Jews picking up their arms and walking like sheep to the slaughterhouse, but they better wake up and understand, we will do whatever is needed to make sure that never happens again! I will not apologize for my guns nor will I apologize for unwilling to cooperate with the radical Islamic terrorists who want us once again to become victims.

I’m sorry the liberals in Israel have been struck with a fatal case of the Stockholm Syndrome and I’m happy the disease is not airborne. The cure? TRUTH!

The only person who would be nervous about my guns are the terrorists who are looking to murder my people and to them I say, be nervous and be scared!

This is why I spend my days and nights with Standing Together 24/7 IDF supporting IDF soldiers with whatever they need.

We must never apologize for our ability to fight back and defend ourselves, just like we should never apologize for winning the wars the Arabs started in order to destroy us and we certainly should not apologize for dancing through the streets of Jerusalem.

If you feel guilty for our ability to fight back, do not get upset at the world if they criticize us for doing so.

You convinced them that a Jew with a gun is the problem and not the reason we are forced to go shopping with an M-16 on our backs.

Ari Fuld

Glasgow Holiday Shoppers Struck by ‘Out of Control’ Sanitation Truck

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

A sanitation truck in Glasgow appeared Monday night to careen out of control in a popular shopping area in the city center.

The truck slammed into a crowd of holiday shoppers, killing at least six and injuring seven people seriously, possibly more.

Police did not release details about the driver, nor have they yet determined the cause of the tragedy. In a similar incident in France, the driver shouted “Allahu Akbar!” before plowing into a crowd of shoppers also Monday night.

A spokesperson for Scotland’s police service told Sky News the incident occurred in the city’s shopping center, but was unable to say how many people were hurt.

The truck appeared to have driven along a sidewalk for about 70 yards, according to an eyewitness who spoke with Reuters. The area was especially crowded due to the nearby fairground attractions and an ice-skating rink that was placed there for the holiday.

Hana Levi Julian

3 Injured in Seasons Supermarket Car Accident

Wednesday, September 24th, 2014

Three people were injured on Tuesday, one seriously, when an elderly man accidentally drove into the Seasons supermarket on Main Street in Kew Garden Hills, NY.

The man was trying to pull out of his parking spot in front of the store, when he accidentally reversed into the store.

A 70 year old man broke both his legs when the car struck him.

One of the supermarket’s staff, who also volunteers for Hatzolah took care of the injured.

The driver was not injured in the accident.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Things Haredim Do

Friday, August 23rd, 2013

A volunteer at the Tachlit center are busy dividing hordes of food into boxes, to be distributed to needy families before Shabbat and before the coming Jewish new year in Jerusalem.

Tomchei Shabbat (supporters of Shabbat) organizations like Tachlit flourish throughout the Haredi communities, each with its unique, local flavor, but all of them with one, central goal: feed the needy.

Most of them also deliver the food boxes quietly, so as not to shame the recipient. In many places there’s also a feedback system in place, allowing recipients to indicate which goods they like and which they’d rather not receive. It prevents waste, and also makes the proces look more like shopping than like charity.

Photo credit: Yonatan Sindel/Flash90

Photo credit: Yonatan Sindel/Flash90

Yori Yanover

A View of Observant Judaism by a Non Observant Jew

Wednesday, March 13th, 2013

I must say that I am both surprised and disappointed at the negative comments about David Brook’s op-ed column in the New York Times. And they weren’t few. They were many. The Forward, DovBear, Failed Messiah, and the many people who commented in the New York Times itself – all of them could not have been more upset about a positive article dealing with Orthodoxy.

I am upset too. Not by the article, but by all the negativity – some of it venomous! It is almost as if the entire column was some sort of a made up lie by an Orthodox cheerleader.

The fact is however, that David Brooks is not Orthodox. Nor is he a cheerleader. He is a respected journalist reporting on his impressions of a community which he is not a part of. Mr. Brooks took a tour of a Pomegranate, a ‘luxury’ kosher food store in the Midwood section of Flatbush a large mostly Orthodox Jewish community in Brooklyn. His guide was my old (…well maybe not so old) friend from Chicago, Rabbi Dr. Meir Yaakov Soloveichik.

The article was very positive. Brooks describes rather well what it means to be an Orthodox Jew living in the modern world. He explains quite nicely the primacy of Halacha in our lives even among the upscale Orthodox Jews who shop at a store like Pomegranate.

Expanding on his encounter with Pomegranate – he makes Orthodox Jews look like role models for all… suggesting that one could do a lot worse than following our ‘countercultural’ model. For example he quotes Rabbi Soloveichik on the Jewish approach to marriage:

“Marriage is about love, but it is not first and foremost about love,” Soloveichik says. “First and foremost, marriage is about continuity and transmission.”

He seems to praise our “deeper sense of collective purpose”:

They are like the grocery store Pomegranate, superficially a comfortable part of mainstream American culture, but built upon a moral code that is deeply countercultural.

He ends with the following paragraph:

All of us navigate certain tensions, between community and mobility, autonomy and moral order. Mainstream Americans have gravitated toward one set of solutions. The families stuffing their groceries into their Honda Odyssey minivans in the Pomegranate parking lot represent a challenging counterculture. Mostly, I notice how incredibly self-confident they are. Once dismissed as relics, they now feel that they are the future.

I think he’s got that right. Even if one looks only at the statistics he cites one can see a very bright future for Orthodox Jewry versus other denominations. At least in terms of population growth:

Nationwide, only 21 percent of non-Orthodox Jews between the ages of 18 and 29 are married. But an astounding 71 percent of Orthodox Jews are married at that age. And they are having four and five kids per couple. In the New York City area, for example, the Orthodox make up 32 percent of Jews over all. But the Orthodox make up 61 percent of Jewish children. Because the Orthodox are so fertile, in a few years, they will be the dominant group in New York Jewry.

British historian Arnold J. Toynbee must be rolling in his grave. This is how he explained our survival: The Jewish people are an ancient relic of a dead past. (He was corrected by Dr. Eliezer Berkovits who successfully challenged him on that notion.)

I felt really good about this article. But it did not take long for all the naysayers to come out of the woodwork – bashing it.

It’s not that any of the claims they were making against it weren’t true. Many of them are. In fact these problems are discussed right here fairly often.

No one screams louder than I do about the miscreants in our midst. Indeed these people are the cause of so much hilul HaShem – it is a wonder how any objective person could ever say anything positive about Orthodoxy. And no one complains more about how some of the more extreme segments of our world could use some serious tweaking.

Nor is Orthodoxy uniformly observed as one might erroneously conclude from this article. Indeed, there are Hasidic, Yeshivish, Lubavitch, Modern Orthodox, and Sephardi communities whose lifestyles are in most cases quite different from each other. Additionally each one of these has their own subgroups. And just like the non observant world, socioeconomic conditions play a very important part in how any of us live.

Harry Maryles

In Hebrew: ‘Shopping’

Monday, February 4th, 2013

קְנִיּוֹת

Whereas שׁוֹפִּינְג (shoh-ping) is still the term that refers to that activity that my mother loves so much, shopping for clothes, Israelis call general shopping – like for food and electronics – קְנִיּוֹת.

קְנֵה פָּחוֹת, חְיֵה יוֹתֵר
buy less, live more
(picture of graffiti at a bus stop in Tel Aviv).

For example:

עָשִׂיתִי קְנִיּוֹת אֶתְמוֹל בַּסּוּפֶּר.

I went (literally, did) shopping yesterday at the supermarket.

קניות comes from the active-simple פָּעַל verb, לִקְנוֹת, which means, in Modern Hebrew, to buy or to purchase (in Biblical and Mishnaic Hebrew, it also means to possess).

A single act of purchasing is a קְנִיָּה, in Modern Hebrew (in Rabbinic literature, this is aקִנְיָן).

For example:

אֶתְמוֹל עָשִׂיתִי קְנִיָּה גְּדוֹלָה.עַכְשָׁיו יֵשׁ מַסְפִּיק אֹכֶל.

Yesterday I made a big purchase. Now there’s plenty of (literally, enough) food. 

From the same root of ק.נ.ה, a shopping mall is a קַנְיוֹן.

Visit Ktzat Ivrit.

Ami Steinberger

Many Happy Returns

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

I never thought I would see the day when “Yossie” would smile. He was not an unhappy man, but rather very serious in demeanor. He never said hello, or any words, to his customers other than those absolutely necessary.

Whenever I went to his store, I felt uncomfortable. It was as if I was invisible. I would greet him when I entered and thank him when I left, but there was never any response. In time, I realized there would never be one. Despite this personality flaw, Yossie’s business was flourishing. His prices were fair, and he was an honest man.

I had not been in his store for a couple of years. My husband was not as bothered as I was by Yossie’s rudeness, and so he was the one who generally went there. Recently, though, I reluctantly found myself there. I’m glad it worked out that way for a number of reasons. I got to see Yossie in a different light, and I also got the chance to give my sister a special surprise.

I was waiting my turn to be served when I noticed something out of the corner of my eye. A woman’s lightweight jacket was hanging on a hook.

Without thinking, I called out to Yossie, “To whom does that green jacket belong?”

He turned to me and quietly responded that it had been left in his establishment about two years ago.

“It’s mine. I can’t believe it. I gave up on ever finding it!”

Yossie looked away, but not before I caught the pleased smile on his face. Who would have ever thought that he would hold onto an abandoned object for such a long time, hoping someone would one day claim it? Who would have thought this could make him smile?

The story does not end here, not without telling you of the story surrounding my missing jacket.

Over the past several years, my sister and I have found ourselves traveling back and forth from Israel to America in order to spend time with our elderly parents.

Whenever possible we chose to fly together, thereby giving each other physical, as well as emotional, support. Most of our trips revolved around our parents, but we also tried to squeeze in quick shopping trips, bringing back gifts for our children and their families.

Two years ago, during the fall season, we found ourselves packing our suitcases yet again. To my dismay, I discovered that I could not find my lightweight green jacket.

I searched everywhere, but concluded that I had simply left it somewhere and would have to buy a new one in America.

I take a limited amount of money with me whenever I travel, and I really am very careful with how I spend it. This way, I can buy something for everyone on my list.

Before I knew it, I had spent almost all of the cash I brought and did not have enough left over to purchase a jacket.

While shopping one day, my sister came over to me with a lovely jacket in her hands.

“Do me a favor,” she said, “and try it on for me. I am too tired to try it on myself, and we are the same size.” I knew she had been planning to buy this particular item herself, and so I tried it on for her.

In the end, she bought it for me. She refused to take it for herself, as she still had another jacket at home while I did not. She said she could always buy the jacket for herself on our next trip.

The next time we traveled to America, as well as on subsequent travels, we searched in vain for another jacket like the one she bought me. We either found one in the wrong size or wrong color, or not quite the same style. I always felt bad to be wearing her “dream” jacket, while she was still searching for hers.

Now, I finally had my chance to rectify the situation.

While still in Yossie’s store, I called her. “Rivky, what is that item you are always searching for in America? Well, guess what? I have it for you!”

Debbie Garfinkel Diament

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/jewish-columns/lessons-in-emunah/many-happy-returns/2012/11/14/

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