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August 26, 2016 / 22 Av, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘shopping’

Home Front Command Issues New Guidelines for Southern Communities

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

Home Front Command has issued defense guidelines to residents of the South. In communities between 0 and 4 miles from the Gaza Strip border: upon hearing sirens or an explosion, you must get into a protected space within the available period of time. Schools will be closed tomorrow. There is a temporary prohibition on public assembly. Do not try to reach work places for tasks that are not essential. Shopping centers are closed.

In communities that are within 4 and 25 miles from the Gaza Strip: upon hearing a siren or an explosion, you must get into a protected space in time. Schools will be closed in all municipalities. No public assembly of more than 100 in open and closed spaces (shows, events , soccer games, etc.). It is permitted to hold gatherings of fewer than 100 without restriction. No restriction on nonessential jobs, malls are open.

Jewish Press News Briefs

Famed IDF Rescue Team in Ghana After Mall Collapses

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

The Israel Defense Forces galvanized its internationally-recognized emergency response team to assist in a search and rescue operation in Ghana Wednesday night, after a shopping center collapsed in the country’s capital.

Doctors, engineers, and others, along with Magen David Adom staff, were sent to establisha  field hospital in the area.  So far, 51 people have been pulled from the rubble, with one confirmed death.

Malkah Fleisher

Jordan: We Stopped an al-Qaeda Plot against Western Diplomats and Commerce

Sunday, October 21st, 2012

The Jordanian General Intelligence Department has foiled a major terrorist plot which was in the planning and preliminary stages, according to the Petra news agency. The plot, by a group of 11 terrorists associated with Al Qaeda, was designed to target and carry out attacks against vital targets in Jordan including shopping centers, residential areas, diplomats and foreign nationals.

The objective of the plot, labeled as 9/11 (2) in reference to the Amman hotel bombings of 2005, was to cause chaos and anarchy and spread fear among the population, setting the stage for further operations to follow. The group had intended to take advantage of what they believed was the Intelligence “preoccupation” with other files, to carry out their plans.

The terrorist group made comprehensive preparations to carry out their crimes against selected targets. They performed surveillance and casing of these potential targets and laid plans for execution using explosives, booby-trapped cars as well as submachine guns and mortars.

The group, which was under constant surveillance at every stage by GID, experimented with explosives after procuring basic material and consulting with senior explosives’ experts from Al Qaeda in Iraq through terrorist websites.

Their objective was to create a highly destructive explosive that would cause the highest number of casualties and extensive physical damage. They had planned to bring TNT explosives and mortar shells from Syria, exploiting the ongoing crisis there.

The group was able to devise new types of explosives to be used for the first time, and planned to add TNT so as to increase their destructive power. Given what they believed to be the “success” of their experimentation with the explosive material, they made their findings available on terrorist websites for the benefit of other extremists. They subsequently started selecting operatives and potential suicide bombers to carry out these attacks.

The early plans of the group were to target diplomats from hotels and public areas followed by the bombing of two major shopping malls in order to draw the attention of the security services away from these selected targets, thus clearing the way for them to target their main objectives in Abdoun, in West Amman.

The plan was for the main attack to be carried out by suicide bombers using explosive belts and devices as well as booby-trapped cars and machine guns.

Subsequently, mortar shells would be fired at the entire neighborhood.

GID has seized machine guns and ammunition along with basic material for the manufacture of explosives. Other seized items included computers, cameras and forged documents. The case has been transferred to the Prosecutor General of the State Security Court for investigation and further legal proceedings.

Jewish Press Staff

Confessions Of a Saveaholic

Friday, September 7th, 2012

For some of us trying to cut corners is not just something we do to save a few cents, it is practically an obsession. While we may have our little tricks designed to shave a few dollars off our grocery bill and squeeze a penny so tight that it screams for mercy, we each have our own little indulgences, the things we absolutely refuse to do just to save a few pennies. Let’s hope that none of my immediate family members read this column because I am about to share some of my personal secrets and they just might disown me.

I don’t throw out food, even leftover cholent: We spend so much time and money on our food. Why are we so quick to throw out anything that doesn’t get eaten immediately? With some foresight and lots of creativity, there is no reason leftovers can’t be refreshed and served again, although obviously you don’t want to serve the same foods ad nauseum. Try making your cholent in a smaller pot to minimize leftovers and if your family won’t eat it for supper one night during the week, find some hungry yeshiva bochurim who will happily polish it off for you. Turn leftover challah into bread crumbs, croutons or challah kugel, or if it wasn’t on the table with meat, resurrect it as French toast, a Panini or grilled cheese. Don’t just reheat that roast chicken. Dice it and turn it into a stir-fry or follow my husband’s lead by sautéing it with onions, mushrooms and a very generous dose of shwarma seasoning. Leftover cold cuts make great deli roll (which freezes really well) or can be diced and tossed with salad or pasta. If you find yourself with an overabundance of matza after Pesach, don’t toss it! Take out your food processor and turn it into matza meal.

I return deposit bottles: Deposit bottles are particularly annoying where I live, because all bottles have to be recycled by law, so it galls me to have to pay the extra five cents on each bottle when it is going to be recycled anyway. Does it really pay to save all those bottles and lug them back to the supermarket? Probably not, but I still do it. I also try to buy my beverages in New Jersey, where they don’t charge a bottle deposit, whenever possible.

I reuse plastic containers: How often has it happened – you buy these cute little containers to pack school lunches for your kids and more often than not, the kids come home but the containers do not. Save your empty cream cheese, cottage cheese, yogurt and other containers for packing school lunches. Not only won’t your kids have to remember to bring them home, but you won’t get stuck washing smelly containers. Empty containers are also great vehicle for discarding leftover sauces and gravies that you don’t want to pour down the drain.

I write my shopping lists on envelope backs: Be it extra envelopes from your most recent simcha or credit card offers that come in the mail, chances are good that you have access to plenty of envelopes that don’t cost a penny. Stash them in a convenient location because they are perfect for writing shopping lists and as an added bonus, you can tuck your coupons inside the envelope so they are easily accessible when you checkout.

I reuse water bottles: Have you ever stopped to weigh a case of two-dozen water bottles? I have. It weighs approximately twenty-five pounds and quite frankly, I don’t enjoy schlepping them in and out of both the shopping cart and my car and have no interest in paying to have them delivered. So while water bottles are great for traveling, trips, sending to camp with the kids and other occasions, around here they aren’t for everyday use and I encourage my kids to grab an empty water bottle and refill it whenever it isn’t too inconvenient.

I flatten and stack my garbage: Not only do I compact my boxes, containers and foil pans before they go in my garbage but when we use disposable plates or cups I stack them up before I throw them out so that they take up a fraction of the space. It’s not that I am really worried about the cost of an extra trash bag or two. It’s just that I don’t want to have to take out the garbage twice as often.

Sandy Eller

You Know You’re Israeli…

Sunday, September 2nd, 2012

You Know You’re Israeli if you spend the last evening before government forces remove you from your legally purchased land by decree of an autistic high court… playing soccer.

These young residents of Migron spent their last Saturday at home kicking the ball around. The High Court of Justice (what a humorous title that is, in light of this decision), on Wednesday evening, August 29, 2012, ordered all 50 families in the Judea and Samaria village of Migron to evacuate their homes no later than Tuesday Sep 4.

In a universe in which Justice reigns, these judges should find themselves on the streets of their affluent Jerusalem and Tel Aviv neighborhoods, homeless. I don’t see any other tikkun to their souls for their brazen act of yet again evacuating hundreds of Jews from their homes in their Jewish homeland.

The injustice of it cries to the heavens, and on occasion Heaven cries back.

I’m looking forward to seeing the entire lineup of Supreme Court justices pushing their shopping carts with all their earthly belongings on the streets of the Jewish state.

I could throw in the Attorney general and his industrious staff, but I’m not sure they deserve shopping carts.

So, you also know you’re Israeli if you don’t forget these crimes against human decency and against the Jewish nation, perpetrated by the high court.

Don’t forget, don’t forgive, and don’t vote for Netanyahu, who’s been enabling these crimes.

Fine, he, too, can have a shopping cart.

Yori Yanover

School Supply Lists

Friday, August 31st, 2012

Basics for All Ages:

–         Backpack
–         Notebooks
–         Folders
–         Pencils
–         Erasers
Elementary School – 1st thru 5th grades

–         Crayons
–         Colored Pencils
–         Markers
–         Glue
–         Scissors
–         Book covers

 

Middle School – 6th thru 8th grades

–         Pens
–         Binders
–         Highlighters
–         Index Cards
–         Lined Paper
–         USB drive

 

High School:

–         TI-84 calculator
–         Sheet protectors
–         Dictionary
–         Headphones
–         White-out
–         Hand sanitizer
–         Water Bottle

Jewish Press Staff

A Modesty Request in Williamsburg – Or Is it?

Tuesday, August 7th, 2012

http://haemtza.blogspot.co.il/2012/08/a-modesty-request-in-williamsburg-or-is.html

Whenever my wife and I visit New York, we try and “take in” all the Jewish neighborhoods. Among the places we visit are Boro Park, Monsey, and the Satmar enclave of Williamsburg.

A couple of years ago as I was walking down Williamsburg’s famous shopping district of Lee Street, I recall seeing a sign in one of the stores that had a message written in both Yiddish (Hebrew characters) and English. The English sign said “Closed”. The Yiddish sign said “Offen” – which is Yiddish for “Open”.

I smiled when I saw it. How clever, I thought for this storeowner to avoid “unwanted” customers. But that smile was immediately followed by the realization that not only was he guilty of Geneivas Daas (deception), he may very well have been guilty of ethnic prejudice.

I thought that the store owner  wanted to avoid the ethnic minorities that share the wider Williamsburg neighborhood with him. Among the 45,000 Satmar Chasidim that live there are significant numbers of Black and Hispanic people.

But perhaps it was something other than prejudice. Maybe the issue was one of modesty in dress.

A sign was posted recently posted in one of those stores that read in English, “Please… do not enter in immodest clothing (i.e. short sleeves pants…).” This was obviously directed towards women.

That sign has caused quite a controversy. In these hot summer days where people tend to dress as comfortably as they can – modesty by Orthodox Jewish standards goes “out the window.” If one is not Orthodox one would hardly be expected to cover themselves up by Orthodox standards of dress. So when these signs went up, cries of “discrimination” were heard.

This is not discrimination. Requiring that patrons observe a dress code does not discriminate against a class of people. People have a right to require dress codes for their establishment. A restaurant for example is well within their rights to require jackets for their patrons. As long as it is all patrons and not just – say… black patrons. The same thing should be true of dress codes for religious reasons.

I therefore side with the Chasdim on this one.

But still… in the back of my mind is that deceptive sign from a couple of years ago: “Closed” in English – “Open” in Yiddish. Was it prejudice or modesty that motivated them? That there was deception involved makes me wonder what the real motivation is.  Is this just a legal way of eliminating unwanted patrons?

Who knows?

But the way the sign reads now, there is certainly nothing wrong with it. Not any more than if I would put up a sign saying that only people wearing underwear on their heads would be allowed in the store.

Harry Maryles

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/blogs/haemtza/a-modesty-request-in-williamsburg-or-is-it/2012/08/07/

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