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October 24, 2014 / 30 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘solution’

The Alternative

Thursday, October 18th, 2012

“We’ve been living under mortar fire for 18 years. We have to do something,” said the young woman from Sderot on Razi Barkai’s radio show.

“What do you want the leaders to do?” asked Barkai.

“I don’t know, but what they are doing now doesn’t help,” replied the Sderot resident.

“Sorry to say this to you, but they also don’t know what to do,” Barkai said. “[It’s] not because they are stupid, but because there is simply no solution.”

It has been about 18 years since the Oslo Accords were implemented. It is simple to understand that the continuous terror raining down on Israel’s cities is the result of those accords. Why then doesn’t Israel’s leadership annul them? Why doesn’t it restore full Israeli control over Gaza, Judea and Samaria? Isn’t it cheaper than digging Beersheba into the ground or covering Sderot with a layer of cement? Isn’t it safer than being the targets of a hail of missiles on civilian targets? What does “there is no solution” mean? After all, just as our very own current president, Shimon Peres, and his cohorts brought this problem upon us, we can free ourselves from the problem.

Why doesn’t that happen?

The answer to that question is two-dimensional. First, the technical dimension: It is impossible to free ourselves of Oslo because those who brought it upon us knew how to tie the fate of a broad spectrum of Israeli elites to the “peace process.” Too many politicians, businessmen, academicians, senior IDF officers, political pundits, journalists, writers and other opinion makers – yes, almost everybody who is anybody in our small land – are sustained in one way or another by Oslo. They are all sitting on the branch that, if we want to solve the problem, must be cut off.

So although we sent the IDF into Gaza in Operation Cast Lead, we stopped precisely at the point when Gaza would have surrendered, leaving us once again responsible over it. That would have cancelled Oslo. That is why I opposed Cast Lead at the time. I knew that the operation was destined for defeat from its very beginning – as later became crystal clear.

The second dimension is the deeper, spiritual reason. It is impossible to blame the Left for the desperate, dangerous and irresponsible Oslo experiment. Zionist normalcy had reached a dead end. Oslo was not anti-Zionist. Oslo was a final, desperate attempt to cling to Zionism, to cling to the return of the Jewish people to its land. (The Disengagement was something else, and the true leftists opposed it.) We returned to history, specifically in this land. If our neighbors cannot accept that – even after they have repeatedly been beaten by us – something is simply not working. “We must compromise,” the Left says. “If we don’t, we will have used the vehicles of secularism and Zionism to return to the exile state of non-normalcy from which we fled. The entire Zionist idea will be proven a failure.”

We cannot claim that the Left has failed because the Right, including the religious Right, never proposed an alternative. That is, until Manhigut Yehudit came along.

“What do you suggest?” Avraham Burg, Molad chairman and the former Knesset speaker, asked Hagai Segal on the Knesset channel. When the answer he got was basically, “We’ll wait and see,” Burg said, “Feiglin is the only person who challenges the political frameworks in Israel.”

That is actually the reason why I am running for Likud leader: to give Israeli society a new direction, an alternative to Oslo. We really can’t nullify Oslo, not because of the technical reason but because, first and foremost, we have no new alternative.

The alternative is already here. When it is internalized, the people of Sderot will finally be able to leave their bomb shelters.

Abbas Blasts Israel as ‘Racist’ at UN Speech, Downplays Statehood Bid

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas blasted Israel in his U.N.address as seeking to end the two-state solution, but he tamped down any plans to seek statehood unilaterally.

Describing what he said were “racist” attacks by settlers on Palestinians in collusion with the Israeli government, Abbas told the General Assembly on Thursday that he has reached the conclusion “that the Israeli government rejects the two-state solution.”

He said, however, that Palestinians remain ready to negotiate a two-state solution.

“We do not seek to delegitimize an existing state, that is, Israel,” Abbas said.

Abbas suggested that his bid to seek Palestinian state recognition at last year’s General Assembly had scored a success with the full-fledged Palestinian representation to UNESCO, the science and culture affiliate of the United Nations.

This year, however, Abbas said that instead of seeking full Palestinian statehood recognition throughout the U.N. Security Council , he would seek the body’s affirmation of statehood as an outcome of negotiations and continue to seek the status of the Vatican – non-member state – at the General Assembly.

Abbas said at least three times that the Palestine Liberation Organization was the sole representative of the Palestinian people, an implied rebuke to Hamas, which still controls the Gaza Strip.

He affirmed Palestine as the historic homeland of three faiths — Judaism, Islam and Christianity — a nod to Jewish anger when he omitted Jewish claims to the land in his speech last year.

Abbas has suspended peace talks with Israel since October 2010, saying it must again freeze settlement expansion before he returns to the table, as Israel did for 10 months that year.

In his own speech following Abbas, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu chided the PA president for delivering a “libelous” speech and urged him to return to talks toward establishing a “demilitarized Palestinian state.”

One, Two, or Three States?

Tuesday, September 11th, 2012

(((CLICK BELOW TO HEAR AUDIO)))

Alternative dialogist Baruch Widen joins Yishai. Together, they present audio clips recently broadcast on Al Jezeera that discuss how the two-state solution hasn’t worked and how Arab movements that span the political and social spectrum are looking for alternatives. Don’t miss this fascinating segment!

Yishai Fleisher on Twitter: @YishaiFleisher
Yishai on Facebook

The Ravages of Justice

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

Here are the refugees from Migron in their relocation camp, in Givat Hayekev.

They are cleaning up their new homes, also known as “caravillas” (combination caravan and villa.

A caravilla is composed of several prefabricated sections that are joined on a foundation. They vary in size from about 650 to 1,000 square feet.

The biggest of these enclaves was established in Nitzan, north of Ashkelon, with 250 caravillas, which has grown to more than 500.

Let’s face it, it’s a trailer park.

The work of Peace Now and a cabal of several other anti-Zionist Jewish organizations, funded mostly by foreign states, is done here.

On to the next salami slice.

Since I was 12, when the territories across the armistice line of 1949 were captured—in 1967—I have opposed the forced transfer of civilian populations. But when I was a kid, we all thought it was the Arabs were would be protecting.

Folks on the left were saying how they would throw themselves in front of the trucks that uprooted Palestinians from their homes.

Now it turns out we were wrong. Arabs don’t get transferred. Ever. The only civilians getting thrown on the trucks (or buses) are Jews.

And no one throws themselves in front of the trucks.

Because it’s done by decree of the Supreme Court, executed by a right-wing government.

Everyone cites the slogan from Deuteronomy, “Tzedek, tzedek tirdof” – Justice, justice shall you chase.

These days it’s “justice” that’s chasing us.

Fellow Jews, here’s a personal solution: when you daven shmoneh-esreh today, all three times, when you get to “birkat ha’minim” – the additional blessing added by the sages to curse out the enemies within – say it with a lot of kavanah. Say it like you mean it. Pound the shtender in front of you with rage when you say it. And if you happen to be the ba’al tfilah today – cry it out loud like a wounded man.

At least show that you’re angry, for Heaven’s sake.

(Yes, I wrote all the key words in Boro-Park style so the GSS won’t come after me… I’m just a coward sitting at his desk, but an angry coward.)

Grasshoppers Of The Desert – Or Lions Of Judah?

Wednesday, August 29th, 2012

“…we were like grasshoppers in our own sight, and so we were in their sight.” (Numbers 13:33)

The land of Canaan was only gained in stages by the Israelites, who had to overcome many internal divisions in order to progress. The same holds true in our day, as Jewry struggles to maintain internal unity while vacillating in its attitude toward the Land of Israel. Though the Jewish right to a sovereign state in its ancestral homeland is incontestable – biblically, historically, morally, and legally – too many Jews and Israelis are self-shackled in the chains of constraint, still mired mentally in the vulnerabilities and fears of the last two millennia, unable to discard the Diaspora.

It is certainly an understandable phenomenon, but a crippling one – and we have suffered dearly from it for far too long.

For some elements of Jewry there remains an intrinsic dryness of the bones. Even some who dwell physically in Israel are psychologically in exile. They have gained the land, but have yet to take possession. Some of their apprehension is well-grounded; inimical consequences will likely result from Israel’s unilateral annexation of Judea and Samaria, or from its full-scale elimination of Hamas and Hizbullah in the next wars. These outcomes, however, can be prepared for and dealt with. Jews are no strangers to dangers. Moreover, the consequences of Jewish half-heartedness vis-à-vis the land and Israel’s enemies have themselves been seriously debilitating and have bitterly afflicted Jewry and Israel since the rebirth of the Jewish state over 60 years ago.

Our modern Jewish nation is a statelet, a quarter of historical Palestine, and much less without the crucial provinces of Judea and Samaria. While these areas, which include eastern Jerusalem and Temple Mount, have been under Israeli control since 1967, the Israeli government at that time insisted that Temple Mount be left to the Muslim Waqf and no leader since has challenged this arrangement. Conventional thinking held that land for peace would be a viable solution to the conflict, and in some places, at some times, with some peoples, it might have worked. But in the contemporary Middle East, history has definitively refuted that premise.

In Lebanon, the Gaza Strip, even in volatile Egypt, time and again land for peace has failed; only peace for peace can endure.

Those who argue for a re-commitment to the two-state solution have been bypassed by history, for the two-state solution to the question of Jews and Arabs in Palestine was implemented in 1921 when the sizable Transjordan was simply handed to the Arabs. Even the three-state solution came and went in 2005 with the ceding of the Gaza Strip. That is the status quo. So whoever speaks of the two-state solution – which really means the four-state solution (Israel for us, Jordan, Gaza and the West Bank for the Arabs) – is inadvertently trapped in nostalgia, for those halcyon days are long gone.

Our answer to the four-state solution must hold firm at No. The provinces of Judea and Samaria form the heartland of our homeland and were regained in a critical six-day war of self-defense against aggressive neighbors with genocidal intentions. For those of us who claim our heritage, these areas and their cities, villages, mountains and valleys are profoundly foundational, part of the bedrock of our collective identity, and no peace is worthwhile that requires the surrendering of our core selves to others. If ever there was a red line, this is it.

The evil report of the Israelite spies who reconnoitered Canaan and the order of its wording evince a poignant truth which we would do well to internalize today: Those who suffer initially from inherent low self-esteem will inevitably signal their denigration to others. As long as the Jewish people sees itself as weak, it will project weakness and embolden its enemies. As long as Jews waver in their sense of rightful claim to take possession of the land, their adversaries will detect spiritual anemia and continue to assail the enfeebled.

Hesitation and reluctance despite a just cause do not deter, but rather incentivize. When we belittle ourselves, none will magnify us. When we act like grasshoppers of the desert, none will treat us like lions of Judah.

Go Jump in the Jordan River

Monday, August 13th, 2012

When you read about the Jordan River in the Bible you easily imagine a massive body of water that crossing it takes a bridge or a miracle (Joshua 3). But when you look at today’s Jordan River, even way up north near its source, you have to conclude that this river had to a have shrunk tremendously, or folks back in biblical times were terrified of water.

The current gets pretty strong in places, though, so you do need to know how to swim.

Perfect solution for the heat on a mid-August day.

Is Weiner Running for Mayor? Show Me the Money…

Friday, July 20th, 2012

Former U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner told People Magazine in an interview on Friday that he is planning to remain just a stay-at-home dad and not run for mayor of New York. The interview was conducted with Weiner’s wife Huma Abedin, a senior aide to U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who was accused by Michelle Bachman of having ties with the Muslim Brothers. (Michelle Bachmann Doubles Down on Muslim Brotherhood Infesting US Government Charge)

Weiner, you’ll recall, is the NY Democrat from New York who resigned from Congress in June of 2011 after lying about tweeting an illicit photo of himself to a young woman.

“I’m very happy in my present life,” Weiner, 47, told People. “The only next dramatic steps I’m planning on are Jordan’s first,” he said, referring to his 6-month-old son.

Abedin also reiterated her support for her husband in the interview and called them “a normal family.”

Maybe. The Wall Street Journal on Friday was asking, if Weiner doesn’t want to be mayor any more, how come his disclosure reports which he recently filed with the New York City Campaign Finance Board are showing he has approximately $4.5 million in the bank?

The WSJ points out that taking into account public matching funds, which are awarded for individual contributions from city residents up to $175, would give Weiner just about $1.5 million in extra cash.

Those funds will expire, the paper emphasizes, unless they’re used in the upcoming election cycle. So what would you do if you were in Weiner’s shoes?

On a personal note – I was heartbroken when the Weiner fiasco brought the skinny, Anthony Perkins in Psycho lookalike congressman was taken down by his own incredible stupidity. Because he was the only individual running for mayor a few years earlier, with a simple solution to New York’s traffic mega-congestion issues: ban trucks from taking shortcuts on Manhattan’s streets.

Now that he’s shown the judgment of a pubescent boy, I’m not so sure any more.

The WSJ quotes Jennifer Lawless, associate professor of government at American University, who says that the resilience of Weiner’s marriage, which didn’t end in divorce despite the guy’s shenanigans, could help persuade voters to trust him.

Except if it turns out he’s been holding on to a solid marriage to a Muslim Brothers sympathizer. I suspect it won’t go over so good in New York.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/yoris-daily-news-clips/is-weiner-running-for-mayor-show-me-the-money/2012/07/20/

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