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Posts Tagged ‘South Florida’

OU Job Board Presents S. Florida’s First-Ever Job Fair

Thursday, January 12th, 2012

The OU Job Board will hold its first Job Fair in South Florida on Tuesday, February 7 from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Young Israel of Hollywood, 3291 Stirling Road. Job seekers and employers can register to participate in the Fair on the Job Board website at www.oujobs.org.

There is no fee for applicants or employers. Registration is mandatory for applicants. No walk-ins will be accepted. At past OU Job Fairs in the United States and Israel, individuals have been hired on the spot or scheduled to visit a company for a second interview.

Employers with available jobs are encouraged to contact Michael Rosner, director of the OU Job Board, at jobsco@ou.org. Employers receive, tables and chairs; table coverings; WiFi access; personalized sign; job postings at the Fair and online; snacks and water; advertising through local press and social media (if desired); free parking; and links to company website (if available).

Potential applicants can view a list online of available jobs and employers who will be attending the fair at www.oujobs.org. For more information, contact jobsco@ou.org or call 212-563-4000.

South Florida’s Jewish Radio Show Changing Stations

Thursday, December 29th, 2011

After 25 years on South Florida’s airwaves, “Shalom South Florida” is changing stations. Beginning Sunday, January 1, the program can be enjoyed every Sunday morning on WSBR-740AM, from 9:30-10:30. The station where it currently airs changed ownership and format.

Roni, the host of “Shalom South Florida,” features a dynamic music program with Israeli, chassidic and Yiddish music, as well as other items of interest for the large South Florida Jewish community.

Roni, a 33-year resident of South Florida, is the longest-running Jewish radio host in Florida history. “It has been an incredible experience sharing Jewish culture with members of the tri-county Jewish community for the past twenty-five years, and we look forward to continuing in our new home” he said.

It’s My Opinion: Conduct Unbecoming An Officer

Thursday, December 15th, 2011

A recent scandal in South Florida has created quite a stir. An officer with the North Miami Beach police department has been accused of trying to cast a spell on the city manager. The action was allegedly engineered to make City Manager Lyndon Bonnet go away. Bonnet felt he had to trim the city budget. Some of the reductions would cut police jobs and funding. Apparently, everyone did not agree.

Officer Edith Torres reportedly tried to coax a janitor to help her sprinkle birdseed in a black-magic style hex. The birdseed was supposed to hold mystical power. The janitor balked and told her boss of the intended escapade.

As a result of the janitor’s report, Torres, a 24-year veteran of the police force, has been fired for “conduct unbecoming to an officer.”

South Florida is impacted by Afro-Caribbean religious practitioners. Many emanate from surrounding islands, including Haiti and Cuba. The practice of Santeria and voodoo are considered by many to be religious ceremonies. Both sects are loosely rooted in Catholic background, with a magical twist.

If the accusations against officer Torres are true, is she protected under the right of religious freedom? After all, isn’t this concept one of the most cherished privileges of our culture?

Yes, religious liberty is a cherished part of American ideology. However, the idea that everyone is entitled to pray and practice as he wishes does not include the right to hurt or harm others.

Law enforcement officials in the United States have an elevated obligation to protect the rights of citizens in our country. They swear to uphold these beliefs. We all are entitled to hold our opinions.

If the accusations against Torres are true, she is indeed guilty of conduct unbecoming to an officer.

Bar Ilan University Makes Key Stop In South Florida

Monday, December 5th, 2011

The founder and director of a new gap year program at Bar Ilan University has made South Florida a key stop on a tour of North America promoting the new program that is intended to buck the trend in falling gap year numbers.

Rabbi Tully Bryks visited high school students across South Florida on November 17 to 20, making stops in Miami, Fort Lauderdale and North Miami Beach as part of a tour of North America that will take him to more than 20 cities.

Bar Ilan Campus

Rabbi Bryks was formerly regional director for NCSY in South Florida for 15 years, leaving the post in 2008 to open ‘Israel XP’ at Bar Ilan University’s Ramat Gan campus near Tel Aviv.

“The new program Israel XP is designed to appeal specifically to students looking for more of a balanced year in Israel, where students can embrace Jewish studies in a relaxed campus setting,” Rabbi Bryks explains. There are regular tours around the country as well as professional internship options accessing different sectors of society. To address financial and career pressures, students can also earn around a year’s worth of academic credits that can be transferred to most universities across North America.

“An inspiring year in Israel strengthens Jewish values ahead of college years and helps unlock a young person’s potential. We don’t want any Jewish students to have to miss out. The idea for this program was really born in South Florida and I’m excited to promote it to students in the area.”

For more information on Rabbi Bryks’s speaking dates or the Israel XP program, e-mail rabbibryks@israelxp.com or visit www.israelxp.com.

Local Rabbi Launches New Career

Wednesday, November 16th, 2011

Rabbi Elchonon Abramchik’s life has taken some unique turns. He was born in China, to parents who spent the war years in the ghetto of Shanghai, and thus survived the Nazi regime.  The popular educator has held many administrative positions in Jewish schools in the United States and Israel. He and his wife now live in Miami Beach.

Rabbi Abramchik, who has spent the past seven years as principal of a girls’ high school in South Florida, is about to make a new but related move.

As someone with nearly 40 years in education, Rabbi Abramchik is constantly approached by people seeking his expertise and guidance. So he decided it was time to launch “Coaching for Life”.

“People should not get confused between being a Life Coach and Coaching for Life,” he says. “They are two different programs designed to improve and enhance one’s ability to reach contentment with oneself. The title of each profession should be understood as two different paths toward growth.”

The “idea of coaching people,” says the rabbi, “is not new.” Indeed, the idea has been used for centuries by people seeking rabbinic opinion on one matter or another. By meeting with the rabbi, the client walks away feeling better about himself and much more directed toward his goals.

Coaching for Life is the practice of supporting an individual with the purpose of achieving a particular result of one’s personal goals. People need a sounding board as well as a motivator; “one needs someone to really listen to them and give honest feedback,” says Rabbi Abramchik.

The goal of this new venture is to have the client focus on the present and future rather than dwell on the past. Rabbi Abramchik says his aim is to draw out a person’s potential. In addition, he will develop rather than impose; have the client reflect rather than direct; and enable the person rather than train the person.

The rabbi genuinely likes people and wants to bring out the best in them. Based on past experience, he believes the undertaking will be successful.

To make an inquiry and receive more information, call Rabbi Abramchik at 786-247-3961 or e-mail him at rabbica@aol.com.

It’s My Opinion: “Big Spending”

Monday, November 14th, 2011

This week’s Art Basel Miami Beach is billed as the largest contemporary art fair in the hemisphere. Until recently, the prognosis for a successful event had been bleak. The worldwide financial crisis had all but devastated the arts.  Now, Art Basel, and the art world in general, has reason to celebrate.  It seems that prices are up and big spending has returned.

In early November, Sotheby’s auction house sold a work created by pop artist Andy Warhol.  The print shows stacks of dollars.  “200 One Dollar Bills” sold for $43.8 million.  The art industry was back in business.

Memorabilia of the late singing star Michael Jackson also went on the auction block. A white glove that Jackson wore to perform his famous moonwalk was recently sold. Although the $420,000 transaction brought in a pittance in comparison to the Warhol sale, it was a sizeable amount for one unmatched glove.

A few days ago, a study came out that many households around the Unite States do not have adequate food.  The report indicated that the need was greatest in homes that had young children.  The reality of this fact is heartbreaking.

We seem to be in an economic best of times and worst of times.  It is easy to criticize what seems to be excessive spending when others are going hungry.  In reality, just the opposite is true.  Big spending is just what our economy needs.

Art Basel is anticipated to bring 40,000 tourists and exhibitors to South Florida.  They will need taxis, lodging and food. The highest form of charity is to give our fellow man a job, to provide the ability to earn a parnasah and no longer be dependent on the kindness of others.

This week’s visitors will eat in restaurants, stay in hotels and attend shows.  They will buy souvenirs, shop boutiques and put money into the local economy.  They will help participate in a real bailout of the South Florida economy.

Jews are admonished not to rely on miracles, however it seems that the local economy has been given a real miraculous boost.

Achim Academy Begins Gifted Program

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

Achim Academy’s Center for Education in South Florida is celebrating not only the beginning of another great new school year but also the start of a much anticipated gifted program. Students and administrators are excited to begin this new phase in the institution’s growth.

“Over eleven years of the school’s existence, we found that students who have difficulty learning are often also gifted, a dual exceptionality,” said Dr. Dolly Aizenman, academic director of the AACE school.

“They need and greatly benefit from individualized assistance in learning how to learn, and how to maximize their natural talent and gifts. Some need more assistance than others, but that’s the beauty of our school. An individualized plan is created for each student to suit his needs, abilities and to best develop his talents.”

Rabbi Bukspan teaches PowerPoint to boys in computer class.

The gifted program is open to boys 13 years and older. In addition to Judaic studies and academic course work, gifted students receive an individualized study plan in their area of strength.

Achim Academy offers younger students an array of exciting programming as well.

The school’s teachers are known for combining different aspects of study into fun and challenging lessons. For example, Rabbi Bukspan teaches his boys how to make PowerPoint presentations in computer class illustrating their Mishnayos or Gemara study topic of the week.

Achim Academy also addresses the needs of students who may need behavior modification and/or social adjustment as well as academic intervention.

For more information about Achim Academy, call 305-945-7443, e-mail info@aaceschool.org,  or visit www.aaceschool.org

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/community/south-florida/achim-academy-begins-gifted-program/2011/11/02/

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