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April 19, 2014 / 19 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘stop and frisk’

Court Blocks Scheindlin Anti-Stop-and-Frisk Tirade, Lhota: Bravo!

Saturday, November 2nd, 2013

In a shocking blow to Bill de Blasio and the critics of the current mayor’s stand on stop-and-frisk, the Federal appeals court blocked Judge Shira Scheindlin’s ruling on police stop-and-frisk and removed her from the case.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the decisions of Judge Shira Scheindlin will be stayed pending the outcome of an appeal by the city. The judge had ruled in August the city violated the Constitution in the way it carried out its program of stopping and questioning people. The city appealed her findings and her remedial orders, including the decision to assign a monitor to help the police department change its policy and the training program associated with it.

The appeals court said the judge had to be removed from the case because she ran afoul of the code of conduct for U.S. judges by compromising the necessity for a judge to avoid the appearance of partiality, in part because of a series of media interviews and public statements responding publicly to criticism of the court.

Keeping it short, Democratic mayoral nominee Bill de Blasio released the following statement:

“I’m extremely disappointed in today’s decision. We shouldn’t have to wait for reforms that both keep our communities safe and obey the Constitution. We have to end the overuse of stop and frisk–and any delay only means a continued and unnecessary rift between our police and the people they protect.”

His Republican opponent, Joe Lhota, saw the Court’s ruling as a reason for celebration, in the last stretch before Election Day.

“Bravo! As I have said all along, Judge Scheindlin’s biased conduct corrupted the case and her decision was not based on the facts,” said Mr. Lhota in a statement. “The ruling by the nation’s second highest court was an unprecedented rejection of both the result of the case and the manner with which it was achieved. From Day One, I have stood with Mayor Bloomberg and Commissioner Kelly in support of these proactive policies that have saved countless lives. The court has vindicated our positions.”

“The only thing more dangerous than Judge Scheindlin’s behavior is Bill de Blasio’s naïve public safety approach,” Lhota charged his opponent. “He has embraced the judge’s actions and has been the public face of unwarranted attacks on our police and the policies, that have had a chilling effect on the NYPD. As I have said repeatedly, his policies will make us less safe. We need a mayor who will stand up for proper police practices, not one who will cave to political correctness. This was a critical first step toward uncuffing the NYPD, but we cannot stop here. The next mayor absolutely must continue this appeal. New Yorkers need to know when they go into the voting booth on Tuesday that a vote for me is a vote for a safe city.”

New Jersey Jewish Student Sues NY Cops over Immodest Frisk

Thursday, July 4th, 2013

Bard College student Samantha Rosenbaum is suing the New York Police Department for carrying out an immodest search while she was walking on a Williamsburg street on  the way from the post office back to her place of work at a store last year.

The suit, reported Thursday by The New York Post, comes amid controversy over Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s charge that the police are carrying out a disproportionate number of frisks on white people. A New York Daily News survey published today revealed that the mayor is wrong, but more troubling is the reason for frisks, whether on blacks or whites.

Rosenbaum, age 22 and from Essex, New Jersey, told the newspaper that she loves animals and stopped to pet a cat she noticed in an alley. The plainclothed police, sitting in an unmarked car, apparently did not look at it that way.

“Hey, stop!” a man yelled from his parked car. “He was really aggressive,” Rosenbaum recalled. “I had no idea who he was, [so] I just kept walking.”

That was the obvious tip-off for the two police officers that she was a criminal, and they ran after Rosenbaum and threw her against the car, asking her if she had drugs.

“This whole time, I didn’t know who these people are,” she told the Post. “Finally, after a few minutes, they tell me they are police. My face and stomach were on the hood. I don’t think anyone, no matter what color you are, deserves to be treated like that.

“I offered to show them the cat. They had two people on top of me, and my arm was really hurting.”

Her lawyer Michael Goldstein added,  “She thought she was getting kidnapped. This is a very nice young lady. This was a false arrest and imprisonment. It’s assault.”

The suit alleges that a policewoman who was part of the search-and-frisk team opened her clothing and peeked underneath at private parts of her body.

According to Rosenbaum, the police finally let her go when she started crying after they threatened several times to haul her off to the police station and charge her with a crime,

“They told me they didn’t want me to have a bad impression of cops so they were going to let me go,” the newspaper quoted her as saying.

Why would anyone even think of such a thing?

There are plenty who would think so.

The New York Civil Liberties Union found in a survey two years ago, quoted by Slate, “Only 11 percent of stops in 2011 were based on a description of a violent crime suspect.” The rest of them were carried out at random, and most of the victim was found to be innocent.

The numbers are astonishing. Hundreds of thousands of people are stopped every year for frisks that turn out to be needless but which the police justify when they file forms after each search. All a police officer has to write is that a person was “carrying a suspicious object” or “wearing clothes commonly used in a crime,” or was wearing “inappropriate attire for season.”

Or, “The suspect was petting a cat.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/new-jersey-jewish-student-sues-ny-cops-over-immodest-frisk/2013/07/04/

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