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September 21, 2014 / 26 Elul, 5774
At a Glance

Posts Tagged ‘story’

A Lie Once Told…

Sunday, December 2nd, 2012

A lie once told seems to be repeated over and over again. Once again, it is the story of a small Palestinian child swapping up blood. And so, they post, “oh god, Gaza…” but no, it wasn’t Gaza – not then, not now.

The original tweet:

And the picture to which they refer:

A lie repeated many times – is still a lie.The picture isn’t from now. It wasn’t from March, 2012. The picture isn’t from Gaza. The blood wasn’t from his brother. The Israelis weren’t involved. It is a young Palestinian boy told to wipe up the blood of a cow slaughtered in his family’s slaughterhouse in Hebron.

I documented it back in March, here: Palestinian Child Washing His Brother’s Blood?

A lie told once, or twice, ore more – is still a lie.

Visit A Soldier’s Mother.

Times Square Screening of New Documentary on Theresienstadt

Friday, November 30th, 2012

The premier screening of the new documentary, “The Resort,” hosted by the World Forum of Russian Jewry (WFRJ) took place Wednesday evening, November 28, at a screening room in New York’s Times Square. The audience included Ambassador Ido Aharoni, Consul General of Israel in New York, Dr. Igor Branovan, Vice President of the American Forum of Russian Jewry, Mr. Ron Meier, Director of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) – New York Region, and Mrs. Svetlana Portnyansky, Producer of “The Resort.”

“The Resort” is an award-winning film about the Theresienstadt internment camp during World War II. Theresienstadt was used by the Nazis as a propaganda tool to dispel rumors of extermination camps by giving the false impression that Jews were being held in resort-like conditions. The representation of Theresienstadt as a resort couldn’t be further from the truth. By the end of the war only 19,000 of the camp Jews survived, out of 160,000.

“The Resort is a very important film that tells the unique story of the exceptional Jews of Theresienstadt who refused to allow the Nazis to break their communal spirit,” said Alexander Levin, President of the World Forum of Russian Jewry (WFRJ). “This is a story everyone should know about, and WFRJ is proud to sponsor this important event to help share the story of these special Jews, who even when facing Nazi atrocities, maintained their hope and courage.”

The movie reveals an unexpected story of a congregation of the brightest minds, and the most well-regarded intellectuals and artists of the European Jewish World. Collectively refusing to accept their likely tragic fate, and collaborating even under the harshest of circumstances, these artists, poets, writers, philosophers and composers left behind colossal evidence of the cultural grandeur experienced at Theresienstadt.

“The Resort” has already received its first award at the Houston International Film Festival, and has been chosen to show at the Montreal World Film Festival. Click to watch the trailer.

Arafat to be Exhumed Today

Tuesday, November 27th, 2012

As reported in JewishPress.com, the process of exhuming Yasser Arafat’s body is to be completed today.

Palestinian’s believe that Arafat was poisoned with radiation, by Israel.

JewishPress.com is following the story, and will try to bring you photos.

The Doll’s Tale

Thursday, November 22nd, 2012

Dear Readers:

The following short story is fictitious, but the situation of Jewish children during the Holocaust being raised by gentile families or in Catholic convents and orphanages is not. While some were re-united with family members who survived the death camps – many were not, and remain lost both physically and religiously. This story is in memory of all the lost children. May they be reunited with their families with the coming of Moshiach.

The Doll’s Tale

Nine-year-old Ruchi was not at all upset when her brother and cousins nicknamed her “Ricki.” She liked the sound of it and it certainly suited her – had it been up to her, she would have been a boy. Boys had more fun and never had to wear dresses and other girly clothes. Her brother Dovi got to wear pants, giving him the freedom to hang upside down on the monkey bars in the park, and to turn cartwheels – while she was prohibited from doing such fun things – because hanging upside down while wearing a skirt was not tznuisdik. After all, she wasn’t three anymore!

And then there was the matter of the ridiculous gifts she got on her birthday or from out of town guests. Dovi would always get a fun toy like a truck, while she, without fail, would be given a useless doll with a smile plastered on its plastic face. Ruchi’s only consolation was that forthwith, the dolls would become perfect targets for Dovi’s water guns or darts. Often they would play “barber” delighting at the pale, pink head that would surface, the outcome of the doll’s “haircut.”

Yet Ruchi was to gain a deeper appreciation for these plastic entities than she would ever had imagined.

The 180-degree change in her attitude took place when she and her family traveled to Israel for the bar mitzvah of the grandson of Bubbi’s older half-sister, Malka. Malka was a rare entity, a child survivor of the Holocaust. She had been born in Poland – unlike Bubbi, who had been born in Israel several years after the war had ended.

Sadly, Malka had passed away three years earlier, at the young age of 65, just months after her and Bubbi’s father. Malka had had a massive stroke, brought on, it was said, by her extreme distress upon losing her father.

Erev Shabbos, Ruchi watched in wide-eyed astonishment as the bar mitzvah boy’s mother lit the candles, hugging a very ragged, ripped up cloth doll. After her tefillah, she kissed it, as did her children.

“What was that all about,” she asked her 11-year-old cousin, Chana, as they lay in their beds that evening. “Why did your mom do that – is that a family minhag? It’s weird!”

It was then Chana told her the story that would forever change Ruchi’s view on dolls.

It was 1942, in Nazi-occupied Poland, and their great-grandfather, Shimon, was beside himself. It was only a matter of days before he, his wife and daughter would be taken out of the c transported to the camps. A former employee of Shimon’s dry-goods store, a Polish girl who appreciated her kind and generous boss, had sent word that her aunt, a highly-placed nun at the convent on the outskirts of town, would hide his child.

Shimon was torn between his desperate desire to save his child’s life, and the horrible thought of placing her in this completely foreign environment.

Two days before a mass deportation, Shimon surrendered his three year old, blond haired daughter, Malka, into the waiting arms of a nun. He and his wife had left her crying inconsolably, fiercely clutching a Raggedy Ann doll – a gift from a relative in America and her constant companion.

Three years later, a gaunt and battered Shimon returned to his town, alone; his beloved wife Zisel had starved to death. While he was incarcerated in Auschwitz, thoughts of finding his little Malka were what kept him alive.

Shimon had been hearing horror stories of Polish families that had been entrusted with Jewish children deliberately disappearing with them. Sometimes, even if the child was found, he, or she, refused to leave the only home he knew, denying any connection with the walking scarecrows who showed up claiming to be kin. The child would make the sign of the cross to protect himself from the sickly looking vagabonds who belonged to the people who had killed the beloved savior.

The Secretive Casualties of War

Thursday, November 22nd, 2012

During the recent Opration Pillar of Defense An Israeli 35-year-old man told his wife that he had been recalled to the reserves, said good bye to her and to their children and headed south – not to the Gaza border, but, instead, to the hotel Le Meridien in Eilat, to celebrate his unexpected freedom with his mistress, the daily Yediot Aharonoth reported Thursday.

The mistress called the wife from the road, pretending to be an IDF official, and informed her that her husband had been drafted and sent to the border.

As luck would have it, the husband, who took his wife’s car to save on gas fuel, made one mistake: he parked his car in front of the hotel garbage cans. A sanitation truck driver who came the next morning to pick up the garbage called the number listed on the car bumper, obtained the woman’s cell number and called her. After a short conversation, the woman realized that her husband was engaged in an entirely non-militaristic activity.

The woman hired a team detectives documented the husband’s southern adventure, and she is planning to sue foe divorce this morning. Last night, unaware that his life as he knew it was over, the husband called to tell his wife about the rough time he was having away from her, in the army.

True story – because I saw it in Yedioth.

Calendar Of Events

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

WHAT: 16th annual Miami Beach Community Chanukah Festival

WHERE: Miami Beach Galbut Family Jewish Community Center, 4221 Pine Tree Drive, Miami Beach

WHEN: Sunday, Dec 9

CONTACT: Laura Goodman at 305-534-3206 or laura@mbjcc.org

* * * * *

WHAT: 33rd Annual South Florida Chassidic Chanukah Festival (see story above)

WHERE: Gulfstream Park, US 1 and Hallalndale Beach Blvd.

WHEN: Thursday, Dec. 13

COST: Free event – sponsorships available

CONTACT: 954-458-1877 or levi@chanukahfestival.com

* * * * *

WHAT: The 5K Run for Family Fitness, created to promote the idea of lifelong healthy living for the entire family, begins and ends at the Michael-Ann Russell JCC campus in North Miami Beach. Participants include runners of all levels and ages as well as teams representing community businesses and organizations. Non-runners are welcome to participate in the One-Mile Fun Walk for Wellness. Funds collected will benefit the Health and Wellness programs and the MAR-JCC.

WHERE: Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center, 18900 NE 25th Ave, North Miami Beach

WHEN: Sunday, Dec 16, 7:30 a.m. – 9 a.m.

COST: $25 Run; $15 Walk

CONTACT: Nancy Carroll 305-932-4200, ext 136

How to Keep Up School Spirit!

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

My oldest daughter loves school. In fact, over the long holiday break, whenever her school was mentioned, she would say in a little sad voice, “I miss my morahs.”

I repeated this story gleefully to my friends. Some of them, the ones with older kids, looked at me with a blasé face and said, “don’t worry; as she gets older she’ll dread going back to school.” My heart fell. There had to be some way to make sure that Shayna kept relishing the joys and stimulation of school.

I took a small, very unscientific survey and came to the conclusion that some older kids like school, and some don’t. The kids who enjoy going to school have two basic reasons: they have friends and they like their teachers.

Lest you think that the easiest way to ensure this outcome is by picking the best school and then utilizing every level of proteczia to get your child accepted, remember this wise quote from Rabbi Fishel Schachter. At a chinuch l’banot gathering, he said people spend too much time researching schools and sweating over interviews. Every school has every type of kid. A lot depends on who is friends with your child. Obviously, you only have a modicum of control over this situation, so like in most cases involving raising children, some meaningful prayer is definitely in order.

There are, however, some basic building blocks every child needs to succeed and a diligent parent should do their best to ensure their child is receiving them.

Firstly, the school is providing a service. It is their duty to provide our children with a solid education, development of healthy values and a safe place to go. Schools have a responsibility to ensure that parents feel comfortable with the environment the school is creating. If there is an issue that you would like to discuss and you feel that the school is giving you a runaround or is difficult to reach, it might be time to consider switching schools.

On your end, you are responsible for not just paying the tuition for the upkeep of the school, but maintaining the sense of kavod towards the school. If the child hears the school, the administration or the teachers being bashed in front of them, how can you expect him or her to pay the school any mind? Rabbi Shmuel Wallerstein once told me a story about a father who ran to his rabbi and begged for help – his son was about to marry a non-Jewish girl. “Why would he listen to me?” asked the rabbi. “You’ve mocked everything I’ve said for the past ten years.”

Parents have to feel that they are partners with the school, building towards a common goal. It bears saying that it is super crucial to develop a positive relationship with your children’s teacher. He or she is one of the most influential figures in your child’s life and you need to be on the same page. Work with the teachers by taking class attendance and homework seriously. If there is an upcoming baby, family wedding, or chas v’shalom a crisis situation, let the teacher know so that she can treat your child accordingly. Signing up for the PTA or as a class mother is always a bonus. It shows the school you are willing to help out, and if a concern comes up, they will respond to you with your dedication in mind.

In my school, two dinner reservations are built into the tuition. I am always surprised by how many parents don’t bother to attend. Personally, I love the school dinner. Not only is the food and ambience par excellence, but it’s a chance to support the school for all its dedication and efforts on behalf of your child. It’s wonderful to hear all inspiring testimonies of the teachers and the list of achievements of the graduates. It really makes you proud of be part of the school. It’s a shame to skip it, especially if you already paid for it.

Then there is the personal front. Make it easy for your teachers to like your child and always make sure that he or she is going to school well rested, clean and fed. As this is a sore point for me, I’ll take a few minutes to clarify. Rested for the average child is 11-12 of sleep hours a night. Without that, children are short-tempered and cranky. A clean child is someone who bathes almost every night, wears clean, un-wrinkled clothes, and knows how to wash up in the bathroom properly. Finally, a hungry child is a distracted learner. Most parents know they should be on top of those things, but life gets in the way, and they figure the teachers will understand. Trust me, she doesn’t. Help your child succeed and take care of his physical needs.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/magazine/for-the-home/how-to-keep-up-school-spirit/2012/11/15/

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