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April 16, 2014 / 16 Nisan, 5774
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Posts Tagged ‘students’

Letter from the Front: The Dean of Lander College for Women Writes to Students from Israel

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012
While spending Shabbat with her family in Jerusalem, Marian Stoltz-Loike, Ph.D, dean of the Lander College for Women-The Anna Ruth and Mark Hasten School (LCW), and the vice president for Online Education at Touro College, heard the piercing sound of an air raid siren, a warning that a rocket attack from Gaza was imminent. The following is a letter she sent to the students of LCW about her harrowing experience:
 
Dear Students,
I am writing from Yerushalayim. By now, I assume that you all know about the events of Friday evening. As you all know, there is always a tremendous busy-ness early on Friday afternoon which progressively quiets down as the time for candle lighting approaches. The pre-Shabbos calm had descended on Yerushalayim; the Yerushalayim Shabbos siren had gone off. I was at my daughter’s home. We had lit candles for Shabbos; my son-in-law had just left for shul and I was sitting on the floor playing with my grandsons, aged 2 and 4. All was calm—it was Shabbos and then a siren sounded. My initial thought was that there was a malfunction in the Shabbos alarm system…and then I heard my daughter yelling from the other room. “Imma, that’s the air raid siren, bring the boys to the shelter.”
Because she lives in a new apartment, she has a safe room. I picked up my younger grandson and told my older grandson to come with us. We had 90 seconds to get there (as compared to 15 seconds in the south), but we had already wasted precious seconds before we realized what was happening. We went to the safe room and for the sake of the children, behaved normally. My daughter sang Shabbos songs with the children and tried to answer my grandson’s repeated questions of “Imma, what do I do if I am at gan and the alarm goes off?”; “How do I go underground?” How do you explain things to a four-year old so he can stay safe without traumatizing him?
What did I think about in that safe room—how do people in Sderot and Beer Sheva do this for four years now?  What will the rest of Shabbos be like?  How many times will this situation repeat itself over Shabbos?  Who has been hurt?
After we left the safe room, we heard many, many emergency vehicle sirens. We were worried that that signified something deadly.  It was not until after Shabbos that we could discount rumors and get accurate news reports (and then understood that the sirens were only part of the normal emergencies that happen in every city).
People here are traumatized. They recognize how lucky they are B”H that no one was hurt, but worry about what will happen tomorrow and where they will be when the next siren goes off.  People’s children go to pre-schools that don’t have proper shelters. They go to work. They leave their homes—they worry about staying safe and keeping their families safe. In Yerushalayim, people understand that one rocket is not the same as the continual barrage in the south and the repeated refrain here, is what can we do for the south?  How could we not have recognized what they are experiencing on a daily basis?
What should you do? First, of course, say tehillim, learn more and daven. Second, send emails to people you know in Israel—friends from high school, students from your school who were a class or two behind you and of course your family. Let them know you are thinking of them. They need that for chizuk and psychological support. Third, write letters to your elected officials on a local, state and national level. Let them know that you stand with Israel, that you support the Gillebrand-Kirk resolution on Israel (if they were among the 62 co-sponsors, thank them) and that the rocket attacks in the south and beyond need to stop. Fourth, use your list serves, social media contacts, etc. to get messages out about your support for Israel and ask your contacts to take action in tefilah, support and chizuk.
Don’t underestimate the impact of your voice.
Dean Stoltz-Loike

Australian Jewish Students Launch ‘Code Red’ Campaign in Support of Israel

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

The Australasian Union of Jewish Students (AUJS) has launched an online campaign to support the one million residents of southern Israel currently living under rocket fire. The campaign asks people around the world to send in photographs wearing red clothing to match the Tzeva Adom (‘Code Red’) warnings that citizens receive when a rocket is about to fall in their area. The Campaign was the joint initiative of AUJS students and Leora Golomb, The Jewish Agency for Israel National Shaliach to AUJS.

The campaign, which was launched on Tuesday, November 13, has already received strong support – with photos coming in from Australia and around the world including the US, Canada and Israel, along with thank you messages from Israelis. Jewish organizations such as the Zionist Federation of Australia have also replaced their logos on Facebookwith a red version in support.

The Jewish Agency sends young shlichim (Israel Fellows to Hillel) to work with university students on over 70 campuses across the United States. In addition, shlichim in Uruguay and Australia work with university students.

Leora Golomb, The Jewish Agency for Israel National Shaliach to AUJS said: “As a formerstudent at Ben Gurion University, who lived for three years in Beer Sheva, I explained to the students how difficult it was for the residents of the South. I felt that we needed to do something, no matter how small to show our support and solidarity The students agreed and immediately began working on the campaign.”

AUJS Campaign coordinator Dean Sherr said the sudden escalation in attacks on Israel had motivated supporters around the world to action: “AUJS’s intention for this campaign was to send a strong, unified message of support to the one million southern Israelis currently living under a barrage of rocket attacks. That message has been overwhelmingly taken up, with photos coming in from around the world – showing that people truly do care.”

UC Irvine Students Vote for ‘Israel Divestment’ But Have No Investments to Divest

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

Late last night, November 13, there was a unanimous vote at a California school for divestment from certain companies that do business with Israel.  Unanimous, 16 -0.

There are, however, several points militating against an uptick in alarm.

For one thing, the school at which this took place was the University of California at Irvine.  Yes, the school that allowed students to repeatedly disrupt Israeli Ambassador to the U.S. Michael Oren, in 2010.  Eleven of those hooligans were charged and convicted of conspiracy and disrupting a public meeting.  Those convictions were obtained despite the efforts of many UCIrvine faculty members, including a large number of  Jewish Studies department faculty.

But more importantly, the vote was taken by the UC Irvine Student Government, which, in all likelihood, does not have any investments in the targeted companies, or any other companies, for that matter.

The student government also called on the UC Irvine administration to divest from the named companies, but a student group’s call on its university to take the students’ investment advice is not exactly like money in (or, in this case, out of) the bank.

While the vote was really the equivalent of a small group of children shouting at those acting in loco parentis to take its investment advice, last night’s effort by anti-Israel student leadership at UCI is noteworthy for a small shift in tactic.

Although the Resolution repeatedly compared Israeli activity to Apartheid South Africa, the student government Resolution only sought divestment from those companies it deemed to provide support for the Security Fence, the demolition of “Palestinian” homes, and the building or maintenance of  the “illegal Israeli settlements” on “occupied Palestinian territory.”  In the past, calls for divestment from Israel typically called for divestment from any company doing business in Israel, which was the South Africa Apartheid divestment model.

The nitty gritty details, that is, that it was a student group that voted to divest its own (non-existent) financial holdings from certain companies – and was not the vote by a university to divest its holdings from companies doing business in Israel – was completely lost on most other media reporting on the vote.  Professional Israel haters such as Ali Abunimeh and Noam Chomsky were quick to add their support, as were Muslim Student Associations and other anti-Israel groups across the country.  To see the misguided glee, check on twitter #IrvineDivest.

The Resolution, which was introduced by Sabreen Shalabi, and seconded by Shadi Jafari, follows:

 

Item Number: 16 Legislation Number (B: Bill, R: Resolution): R48-15
Synopsis: Divestment from Companies that Profit from Apartheid
Date of Presentation: November 13, 2012
 Divestment from Companies that Profit from ApartheidWHEREAS, it is UC Irvine’s duty to maintain the values of “respect, intellectual curiosity, integrity, commitment, and empathy” which includes the promotion of human rights, equality, and dignity for all people without distinction;WHEREAS, it is the mission of the UCI Foundation to “ensure the appropriate use of all funds” in order to uphold the values of respect, intellectual curiosity, integrity, commitment appreciation, and empathy;WHEREAS, students have a legacy of standing against oppression and injustice at UC Irvine and across the U.S.;WHEREAS, the role of student activists in exposing South Africa’s apartheid system and  supporting equality, freedom, and dignity sets an example for us to follow as students of global conscience;WHEREAS, as the example of South Africa shows, it is imperative for students to stand unequivocally against all forms of racism and bigotry globally and on campus, including but not limited to Islamophobia, anti-Semitism, homophobia, patriarchy, and Israel’s system of apartheid;WHEREAS, the occupied Palestinian Territory is controlled militarily by the Israeli government;WHEREAS, certain companies have promoted and been complicit in these ongoing human rights violations systematically committed by the Israeli government, which have been documented by human rights organizations including Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, Al-Haq, Defense for Children International, Addameer, B’tselem, Adalah, Badil, and the Israeli Coalition Against Home Demolitions;WHEREAS, according to the International Court of Justice (ICJ), “the construction by Israel of a wall in the Occupied Palestinian Territory and its associated régime are contrary to international law”;WHEREAS, according to the same ICJ decision, the establishment and expansion of settlements in the West Bank and Eastern Jerusalem is also illegal by international law;

Red Alert in Be’er Sheva, 10 Rockets Fell

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

At least 10 rockets were fired at Be’er Sheva in the Negev this evening. Several sirens were sounded in the city

Throngs of Israeli student pack the Be’er Sheva train station, due to the closing of Ben Gurion University. To accommodate the masses of students, Israel Rail Road is sending extra long trains to evacuate the students looking to escape northward.

One of the Kassam rockets fell in a shopping mall in the city. A building was damaged but there were no casualties.

Two of the rockets were blocked by the Iron Dome system.

Israel Railroad Evacuating Students

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

Throngs of Israeli student pack the Be’er Sheva train station, due to the closing of Ben Gurion University. To accommodate the masses of students, Israel Rail Road is sending extra long trains to evacuate the students looking to escape northward.

Exclusive: Grad Lands In Naveh, Near Shocked Yeshiva Students

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

JewishPress.com received an eye witness account of a Grad missile that landed in Naveh, a mere 100 meters from the Otzem (Atzmona) Premilitary Academy.

Shocked yeshiva students had just finished lunch and were outside when the rocket slammed down in front of them, with shrapnel landing a mere few yards away from where they were standing.

No “Red Alert” siren sounded ahead of the attack.

The site is now teaming with IDF personnel, and all the yeshiva students have been ordered into bomb shelters.

It is suspected that this rocket may have been launched from Sinai, which would possibly explain why the “Red Alert” did not sound.

 

 

‘Cheat the Reaper’ Event

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

The RASG Hebrew Academy staged “Cheat the Reaper,” on October 30. The program is an award-winning effort to alert high school students about the hazards of both drinking and driving and texting and driving.

Members of the police and fire departments and Hebrew Academy students simulated an auto accident staged in front of the school’s Fana Holtz High School campus, located at 2425 Pine Tree Drive. The event utilized video, live scene acting and makeup artists to bring the dangers and realities of drunk driving and texting and driving to the attention of students.

Members of the Miami Beach Fire Rescue Team and Police Department tend to mock accident victims.

As part of the scenario, all agencies that would normally be called upon to respond to this type of incident did what they normally would do. The police responded and performed the accident investigation, sobriety test and arrest. Fire rescue extricated the “victims,” stabilized them and transported them to the hospital. Funeral home attendants carried and loaded the “deceased” into a hearse.

Only the student actors and a few key personnel knew the “accident” would be staged, making the event a powerful and realistic experience to the onlookers.

For more information about this meaningful and important lesson contact Isaac Sochaczewski at (305)532-6421 ext. 136 or at isochaczewski@rasg.org.

The RASG Hebrew Academy is an Orthodox Jewish college and yeshiva preparatory school serving students from through grade 12. The Hebrew Academy’s goal is to inspire and equip students to achieve their fullest potential both academically and spiritually and instilling eternal Torah values in a changing world.

Israeli Jewelry Entrepreneurs Give Back to Ethiopian Community

Tuesday, November 6th, 2012

Orna Levy is a fourth generation Jerusalemite whose family has been in the jewelry-making business for the past 100 years. Orna and her husband Itzik Levy, an immigrant from Argentina, created the Yvel company in 1986, and their jewelry line—featuring pearls, sapphires, diamonds and other gems—is internationally known. Today, Yvel (Levy spelled backwards) manufactures its jewelry in Israel and exports to 650 retail outlets on five continents including Neiman Marcus. Katy Perry, Rihanna, Maria Sharapova, Scarlett Johansson and Isla Fisher have been seen wearing Yvel-designed jewelry at celebrity functions and on magazine covers.

The company’s employees are mostly immigrants who have come to Israel from places like the United States, Syria, Iraq and Ethiopia. The Levys’ business philosophy is firmly rooted in social responsibility and philanthropy.

“Itzik’s father lost all of his family’s savings in a bad business deal upon arriving to Israel,” explains Orna. “Itzik has never forgotten this and has always aimed to strengthen weaker immigrant populations in Israel.”

This is why Itzik and Orna celebrated Yvel’s 25th anniversary in 2010 by establishing the Megemeria School of Jewelry and Art, which offers professional training in jewelry crafting and design to new Ethiopian immigrants.

Partnering with the Association for Community Empowerment (Yedid), which assists Israelis in becoming self-sufficient members of society, the Levys opened the school within the Yvel complex, outside Jerusalem. The school gives the students, who are all recent immigrants from Ethiopia, jewelry-making training followed by employment opportunities in the Yvel factory once they complete the program.

While learning the jewelry trade, including gem-setting, gold and silver-smithing, and the design process, the students also receive Hebrew lessons, family budget and management training, math courses, and Israeli cultural lessons. For many of the Ethiopian students, who had little if no formal education back in Ethiopia, these supplementary courses are critical for a better integration into Israeli society and finding employment.

Yedid’s executive director Sari Rivkin says that the first graduating class of Megemeria has produced a special collection which was inspired by the immigrants’ personal and collective journey from Ethiopia to Israel. “Many of the jewelry designs feature words from the students’ native Amharic language. This is a very unique social enterprise,” Rivkin explains.

Once the students graduate and take the Israel Ministry of Industry, Trade and Labor certification exam, they can begin working at Yvel’s Design Center either in jewelry design or in sales and administration. For the graduating class this year, eight will continue on with Yvel, making and selling jewelry, with profits helping to cover their salaries and the costs of the school.

Abbito Einalem, an Ethiopian student who came with no background in crafting jewelry, now looks on proudly at a pendant she has created, inscribed with the Amharic word desta, which means happiness. “I want to continue in this profession in the future,” she says. “It has given me so much already.”

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/israeli-jewelry-entrepreneurs-give-back-to-ethiopian-community/2012/11/06/

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