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August 29, 2016 / 25 Av, 5776

Posts Tagged ‘survey’

Survey: Majority of Israeli Jews Favor Keeping Judea and Samaria, Israeli Arabs Favor Keeping Large Settlement Blocs

Tuesday, July 5th, 2016

“Sometime after the Six Day War the settlement enterprise began to develop. In your opinion, from a perspective of 50 years later, has the settlement enterprise contributed to or damaged Israel’s national interest?” was one of the opening questions in a June survey comparing the attitudes of Israeli Jews and Arabs on the liberated territories.

The survey found that 52% of the Jewish public thinks the settlement enterprise has contributed to the national interest.

And so the survey noted that “some claim that over the years Israeli governments have invested many resources and monies in developing the Jewish settlements and infrastructures in the West Bank/Judea and Samaria, and previously also in Gaza, at the expense of other areas and populations in Israel that are disadvantaged and would have needed these resources and budgets. Others claim that there is no connection between the two because one does not come at the expense of the other.” Then it inquired, “With which claim do you agree?”

49% of the Jews said there is no connection between the two; 45% say the investment in the territories comes at the expense of budgets for deprived areas and disadvantaged populations.

In the Arab public, a two-thirds majority considers the investments in the territories a detraction from investments in deprived areas and disadvantaged populations inside green line Israel.

The Peace Index is a project of the Evens Program for Mediation and Conflict Resolution at Tel Aviv University and the Guttman Center for Surveys of the Israel Democracy Institute. The June survey, conducted by phone on June 28-29, 2016, included 600 respondents — 500 Jews, 100 Arabs, who constitute a representative national sample of the entire adult population of Israel aged 18 and over. The maximum margin of error for the entire sample is ±4.1%.

The survey also found that a majority of the Jewish respondents do not know for sure the size of the Jewish or of the Palestinian population in the West Bank/Judea and Samaria. Asked how many Jews live in these territories (not counting the neighborhoods of expanded Jerusalem such as Gilo or Pisgat Ze’ev), about 25% underestimated the figure to be 100,000-250,000, 30% answered correctly that the number is 250,000-500,000, 13% gave an overestimate of 500,000-750,000, 3% thought the correct number was 750,000 to a million, and about 25% did not know at all.

As to the Arab population in Judea and Samaria, not counting Jerusalem, the estimates were: 24%—half a million to a million, 36%—one to two million, 10%—two million to three million, and 3%—over three million. 27% did not know.

The fact is that no one really knows how many Arabs live today in the parts of Judea and Samaria governed by the Palestinian Authority, and so, in this instance, there is no wrong answer.

59% of the Jews and 73% of the Arabs favor holding a referendum on Israel leaving the territories. As to how the respondents would vote in such a referendum, 52% of the Jews reported that in the existing situation they would vote against a withdrawal, while 36% answered that they would vote in favor.

Among the Arabs 69% said that if a referendum were to be held today, they would vote in favor of leaving the territories while retaining the large settlement blocs.

Only 51% the Jewish respondents believe all the citizens of the state would be entitled to participate in such a referendum. 44% believe that only the Jewish citizens of the country should be entitled to participate.

David Israel

Survey: Israelis Don’t Read Good, Don’t Count So Good Either

Wednesday, June 29th, 2016

Israeli grownups are less skilled than most citizens of the industrialized countries in math, reading and problem-solving in a digital environment, the Central Bureau of Statistics announced on Tuesday. The findings were collected by the Israeli Survey of Adult Skills, which is part of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies for 2014-2015.

In reading literacy, the average score in Israel is 255 compared with 268, the OECD average, placing Israel in 28th place out of 34 countries in this category.

In math literacy, the Israeli average is 251, compared with 263, placing it in the 29th spot out of 34 countries.

In solving problems in an online environment, the Israeli average is 274, compared with 279, placing it in 24th place out of 29 countries surveyed.

However, in all three areas, Israeli Jews scored far better than their Arab neighbors, with an average gap of 40 to 50 points in every area. Israeli Jews consistently scored at the OECD average, while Israeli Arabs fell far below.

The surveys were conducted in Hebrew, Arabic and Russian.

The survey found that only 9% of Jews lacked basic digital skills: using a computer mouse, scrolling down a website, compared with 34% of the Arabs surveyed.

The average score of younger participants was higher than the score of older participants in all three areas. The older the participant, the lower the score. However, Jewish scores strated dropping significantly at age 40, while Arab scores did at 30.

Men lead women in Israel in math literacy, but the two sexes are equal in reading literacy and in problem solving.

The survey found a correlation between participants’ scores and their income level. Participants with total inexperience in using computers reported annual incomes as low as $20,890.

Haredi Jews performed particularly badly compared with non-Haredi Jews in problem solving: 19% to 37% correspondingly.

JNi.Media

Ipsos Survey: One Third of American Students Support Boycotting Israel

Monday, May 30th, 2016

One third of American students believe boycotting Israel is justified and constitutes a legitimate means of applying political pressure on the Jewish State, according to a yet to be released Ipsos survey, Israel’s Channel 2 News reported. Ipsos is one of the world’s leading market research firms for hire, managed and controlled by research professionals, offering comprehensive global research programs in 87 countries.

The original Channel 2 story mistakenly assigned those statistics to the US population at large. It was later corrected.

The survey, which will be officially released in advance of an International conference on the struggle against BDS to open on Tuesday, polled a sample of 1,100 American students. It suggests that 33% find a boycott against Israel to be justified. A similar survey conducted in the UK found that 40% of the students there agree that boycotting Israel is legitimate.

The good news is that a 62% majority of US respondents believe that the BDS movement is a form of modern anti-Semitism. About 50% of Briton students also condemn the BDS as being anti-Semitic.

The anti-BDS international conference, titled, “Building Bridges and Fighting Boycotts,” is organized by Israel’s UN envoy Danny Danon, in collaboration with the World Jewish Congress, Keren Hayesod, the American Center for Law and Justice, the Anti-Defamation League, the Zionist Organization of America, Israel Bonds, StandWithUs, B’nai B’rith International, Hillel, and CAMERA. More than 1,500 are expected to participate, including students, representatives of anti-BDS organizations, Jewish American organizations, and opinion makers.

JNi.Media

Survey: A Party Led by Ya’alon, Sa’ar, Kahlon, Could Defeat Netanyahu

Friday, May 27th, 2016

An Israel Radio/Rafi Smith survey on Friday revealed that a new center-right party led by former Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon (Likud), former Education Minister Gidon Sa’ar (Likud), and still serving Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon (Kulanu) would have won as many as 25 seats in the next Knesset, if the vote were conducted today.

The new, imaginary party, which for the time being is only based on the fantasies of the folks who conducted the survey and the 500 folks, Jews and Arabs, who answered, will apparently be the big winner of the next elections. Likud would be demoted to 21 seats (from 30); Lapid’s Yesh Atid’s rise would be tamed, only 2 new seats, from 11 to 13; the Zionist Camp (they really should go back to calling themselves simply Labor) would be crushed, from 24 down to 11; the Joint Arab List would retain its 13 seats; Naftali Bennett’s Habayit Hayehudi would grow from 8 to 10; Yisrael Beiteinu up from 6 to 8; United Torah Judaism up nicley from 6 to 8; Shas would remain stuck with its 6 seats; and Meretz likewise with its 5.

The question is, even considering the above fantasy scenario, whether the Ya’alon-Kahlon-Sa’ar triumvirate, assuming they would be able to overcome their egos to allow one of them to lead, would be able to form a coalition and with whom.

If they go left, they could add Lapid, Labor and Meretz for a 54-seat coalition, which could rule with the tacit, conditional support of the Arabs.

If they go right, they would have to add Netanyahu and Lapid, for a 59-seat coalition, and then, possibly, Labor, giving them a hefty, 70-seat coalition.

But should the imaginary party not be able to forge a coalition, the president would then turn to Netanyahu, yet again, who would combine Likud, Habayit Hayehudi, Yisrael Beiteinu, UTJ and Shas to get 53 seats, and then bring in an additional partner, possibly even the very triumvirate that couldn’t.

The fact is that even in their fantasy, the center parties find it difficult to make do without Bibi.

The same survey also polled the 500 likely voters as to their choice today without a dream team running: Likud goes down to 28 (from 30), making it still the unavoidable leader; Labor is cut down from 24 to 15; Yesh Atid goes up to 19; Kahlon’s Kulanu virtually disappears, down to 6; UTJ 8; Shas 7; Lieberman 8; Meretz 5, Arabs 13.

Which would mean the exact same players in Netanyahu’s current coalition could stay on, but they would have more votes to offer the slightly reduced Likud and without Kahlon. Netanyahu’s next government would then have a 61-seat majority, with Habayit Hayehudi as the second-largest partner. Kahlon could then be invited to come back, but on radically less favorable terms.

David Israel

Pew Survey: Support For Israel Eroding Among Younger Democrats

Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

Earlier this month, a Pew Research Center survey examining attitudes about foreign policy among the U.S. electorate found that Americans continue to strongly favor Israel (54 percent) over the Palestinians (19 percent). Yet the survey also indicated a number of trends that suggest a possible erosion of the long-held bipartisan pro-Israel consensus.

Notably, while figures show sympathy for Israel has remained relatively consistent over the past few decades, there has been a slight uptick in sympathy for the Palestinians, 14 percent to 19 percent, from July 2014 – with a substantial increase in support for the Palestinians among respondents ages 18-29, also known as millennials.

At the same time, Pew’s data confirmed a partisan divide on Israel. While support for Israel among Democratic voters has remained steady over the past few decades – 44 percent in 1978 compared to 43 percent today – there has been a sharp rise during that time in Republican sympathy for Israel, 49 percent to 75 percent, and a modest gain among independents, 45 percent to 52 percent.

Only 33 percent of Democrats who describe themselves as liberal support Israel, while 40 percent sympathize with the Palestinians.

The survey revealed a further divide within the Democratic electorate itself. Hillary Clinton supporters were more likely to sympathize with Israel than the Palestinians, 47 percent versus 27 percent, while Bernie Sanders supporters favored the Palestinians over Israel by 39 percent to 33 percent.

“Evidence has been accumulating for some time of a division among Democratic voters over Israel,” said Dr. Theodore Sasson, senior research scientist at the Cohen Center for Modern Jewish Studies and the Steinhardt Social Research Institute at Brandeis University. “The left wing of the party is more critical of U.S. support for Israel.”

Dr. Jonathan Rynhold, director of the Argov Center for the Study of Israel and the Jewish People at Bar-Ilan University, said that generally the American public’s sympathy toward Israel has been growing since 2000.

Yet Americans have become more divided over policy on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and those divisions “increasingly line up with the main ideological and political divides in America,” he noted.

“Since younger Americans are more liberal, and each generation is more liberal than the previous generation, they are less sympathetic toward Israel and more inclined to believe that the U.S. should adopt an even-handed approach toward the conflict,” Rynhold told JNS. “They are also more critical of Israel’s use of military force against Hamas and Hizbullah.”

“I doubt the level of hostility [in America] will reach the levels we see in Europe,” said Brandeis’s Sasson. Rynhold echoed that sentiment, saying the gap on Israel between the American left and the European left remains wide.

“American liberals are far more sympathetic to Israel than the European left,” Rynhold said. “The gulf remains huge. The debate in the U.S. is over siding with Israel or being even-handed, and that goes for the Democrats as well. Whereas on the European left, the debate is over [being] anti-Israel or even-handed.”

Yet fears persist about the growing liberal electorate’s views on Israel, especially among younger Americans.

“Over time, as the percentage of liberals among Democrats increases, the party’s support for Israel could well become more conditional on what they perceive as Israel’s willingness to support a two-state solution and perceptions related to other liberal causes inside Israel,” Rynhold said.

(JNS)

Sean Savage

Survey: Rightwing Jews More Comfortable Speaking Out in Israel than Counterparts

Sunday, May 8th, 2016

Rightwingers are more comfortable speaking their mind in Israel, according to a survey published on Sunday by the Jewish People Policy Institute (JPPI), an Israeli non-profit, independent professional policy planning think tank. The survey was conducted as part of the Jewish pluralism in Israel Index with the support of the Davidson Foundation. According to the survey, half the people who align themselves with the left do not feel comfortable speaking out in Israel, as compared with an absolute majority of people who are aligned with the right — more than 90% — who feel “very comfortable” or “quite comfortable” expressing themselves in the Jewish State.

The survey was conducted for JPPI among 1,000 respondents, out of whom 30.4% described themselves as completely secular, 20.8% secular and a bit traditional, 22.5% traditional, 4% liberal religious, 10.3% religious, and 10.1% ultra-Orthodox.

The survey examined the image of different population groups in Israel, and their perception in relation to their contribution to the success of the state. It revealed that IDF soldiers are perceived as the most positive group, substantially ahead of any other group. At the bottom of the list are two groups which tend not to serve in the army: Muslims and Haredim. The Druze, in comparison, are very high on the sympathy ladder. Also, diaspora Jews are more popular than Israelis who chose to move abroad.

The researchers posed a string of seemingly contradictory questions: more than 60% of Israeli Jews said they favor civil marriages in Israel, but at the same time more than half objected to the possibility of “Jews marrying non-Jews.”

The majority of the Jews in Israel believe women should not be permitted to put on tefillin at the Western Wall, while 56% of Jewish respondents believe Israel must be more considerate of the views of minority groups. Nevertheless, the majority of Jews believe “secular, traditional and religious are equally good Jews.”

Interestingly and perhaps disturbingly, almost 48% believe there’s too much freedom of expression in Israel.

The term “Jewish pluralism” is defined by JPPI for the purpose of the survey as “a situation in which Jews in Israel and around the world, from different social, ideological and religious groups, regardless of their sex and ethnicity, will have an equal opportunity to express their differences in public.”

JNi.Media

Survey: 59% of Israeli Youth Are Rightwingers

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016

A recent survey of the Hagal Hakhadash Institute / Israel Hayom based on interviews with Jewish high school students in the 11th and 12th grades, revealed that close to 60% of the respondents define their views as rightwing, 23% are at the center and only 13% identify with the left side of the political map in Israel.

The youths were asked questions about every facet of their lives, starting with their views on current events, general knowledge, and their leisure habits.

The survey found Israel’s youth to be very patriotic: 85% said they love their country, and 89% see their future in Israel. 88% plan to enlist in the IDF, more than half believe there is no more moral army than the IDF in the world, and 65% endorse the adage, “It’s good to die for our country,” which is attributed to Yosef Trumpeldor, a Zionist pioneer, leader and warrior who said it—or a statement in that spirit, according to several testimonies, just before dying in defense of Tel Hai in Upper Galilee, on March 1, 1920.

Israel’s youth feel that the best thing about Israel is the familial atmosphere and the people’s tendency to unite during times of trouble. The central problem is Israel’s security situation.

Israeli young people are involved in the world, have solid views, and 78% of them say they are interested in the news. Regarding the most recent security-related saga of the Hebron soldier who shot an Arab terrorist on the ground, 60% of the respondents felt he shouldn’t be court martialed, as opposed to 30% who believe he should be.

Regarding the scandalous behavior of Arab MKs who showed up to honor the families of killed terrorists with Jewish blood on their hands, close to half the Jewish youths — a whopping 48% — believe Israeli Arabs should not benefit from representation in the Knesset, and 52% still believe Israeli Arabs should have the right to vote and be elected.

As to the chance for a peaceful solution of the Israeli-Arab conflict, as many as 82% of respondents said there was no chance at all, or only a very faint chance for such a thing to happen.

The survey holds an unexpected surprise for anyone who comes in regular contact with youth anywhere in the world — 75% of respondents said they appreciate their teachers, even admire them.

David Israel

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/survey-59-of-israeli-youth-are-rightwingers/2016/04/13/

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